MPEG-4 Part 11

See also: Banded Iron Formation

MPEG-4 Part 11 Scene description and application engine was published as ISO/IEC 14496-11 in 2005.[1] MPEG-4 Part 11 is also known as BIFS, XMT, MPEG-J.[2][3] It defines:

  • the coded representation of the spatio-temporal positioning of audio-visual objects as well as their behaviour in response to interaction (scene description);
  • the coded representation of synthetic two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) objects that can be manifested audibly or visually;
  • the Extensible MPEG-4 Textual (XMT) format - a textual representation of the multimedia content described in MPEG-4 using the Extensible Markup Language (XML);
  • and a system level description of an application engine (format, delivery, lifecycle, and behaviour of downloadable Java byte code applications). (The MPEG-J Graphics Framework eXtensions (GFX) is defined in MPEG-4 Part 21 - ISO/IEC 14496-21.[4])

Binary Format for Scenes (BIFS) is a binary format for two- or three-dimensional audiovisual content. It is based on VRML and part 11 of the MPEG-4 standard.

BIFS is MPEG-4 scene description protocol to compose MPEG-4 objects, describe interaction with MPEG-4 objects and to animate MPEG-4 objects.

MPEG-4 Binary Format for Scene (BIFS) is used in Digital Multimedia Broadcasting (DMB).[5]

The XMT framework accommodates substantial portions of SMIL, W3C Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and X3D (the new name of VRML). Such a representation can be directly played back by a SMIL or VRML player, but can also be binarised to become a native MPEG-4 representation that can be played by an MPEG-4 player. Another bridge has been created with BiM (Binary MPEG format for XML).[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ ISO. "ISO/IEC 14496-11:2005 - Information technology -- Coding of audio-visual objects -- Part 11: Scene description and application engine". ISO. Retrieved 2009-10-30.
  2. ^ "MPEG-J White Paper". July 2005. Retrieved 2010-04-11.
  3. ^ "MPEG-J GFX white paper". July 2005. Retrieved 2010-04-11.
  4. ^ ISO. "ISO/IEC 14496-21:2006 - Information technology -- Coding of audio-visual objects -- Part 21: MPEG-J Graphics Framework eXtensions (GFX)". ISO. Retrieved 2009-10-30.
  5. ^ "MPEG Intellectual Property Management and Protection". chiariglione.org. April 2009. Retrieved 2010-04-11.
  6. ^ Leonardo Chiariglione (2005-03-08). "Riding the media bits - Bits and bytes". Archived from the original on 2010-09-25. Retrieved 2009-10-30.

External links

Extensible MPEG-4 Textual Format

The Extensible MPEG-4 Textual Format (XMT) is a high-level, XML-based file format for storing MPEG-4 data in a way suitable for further editing. In contrast, the more common MPEG-4 Part 14 (MP4) format is less flexible and used for distributing finished content.

It was developed by MPEG (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29/WG11) and defined in MPEG-4 Part 11 Scene description and application engine (ISO/IEC 14496-11).XMT provides a textual representation of the MPEG-4 binary composition technology, based on XML. The XMT framework accommodates substantial portions of SMIL, W3C Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and X3D (the new name of VRML). Such a representation can be directly played back by a SMIL or VRML player, but can also be binarised to become a native MPEG-4 representation that can be played by an MPEG-4 player. Another bridge has been created with BiM (Binary MPEG format for XML).

MPEG-4

MPEG-4 is a method of defining compression of audio and visual (AV) digital data. It was introduced in late 1998 and designated a standard for a group of audio and video coding formats and related technology agreed upon by the ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29/WG11) under the formal standard ISO/IEC 14496 – Coding of audio-visual objects. Uses of MPEG-4 include compression of AV data for web (streaming media) and CD distribution, voice (telephone, videophone) and broadcast television applications.

MPEG-7

MPEG-7 is a multimedia content description standard. It was standardized in ISO/IEC 15938 (Multimedia content description interface). This description will be associated with the content itself, to allow fast and efficient searching for material that is of interest to the user. MPEG-7 is formally called Multimedia Content Description Interface. Thus, it is not a standard which deals with the actual encoding of moving pictures and audio, like MPEG-1, MPEG-2 and MPEG-4. It uses XML to store metadata, and can be attached to timecode in order to tag particular events, or synchronise lyrics to a song, for example.

It was designed to standardize:

a set of Description Schemes ("DS") and Descriptors ("D")

a language to specify these schemes, called the Description Definition Language ("DDL")

a scheme for coding the descriptionThe combination of MPEG-4 and MPEG-7 has been sometimes referred to as MPEG-47.

Scalable Vector Graphics

Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML-based vector image format for two-dimensional graphics with support for interactivity and animation. The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) since 1999.

SVG images and their behaviors are defined in XML text files. This means that they can be searched, indexed, scripted, and compressed. As XML files, SVG images can be created and edited with any text editor, as well as with drawing software.

All major modern web browsers—including Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, and Microsoft Edge—have SVG rendering support.

X3D

X3D is a royalty-free ISO standard for declaratively representing 3D computer graphics. File format support includes XML, ClassicVRML, Compressed Binary Encoding (CBE) and a draft JSON encoding. It became the successor to the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) in 2001. X3D features extensions to VRML (e.g. CAD, geospatial, humanoid animation, NURBS etc.), the ability to encode the scene using an XML syntax as well as the Open Inventor-like syntax of VRML97, or binary formatting, and enhanced application programming interfaces (APIs).

The X3D extension supports multi-stage and multi-texture rendering; it also supports shading with lightmap and normalmap. Starting in 2010, X3D has supported deferred rendering architecture. Now X3D can import SSAO, CSM and Realtime Environment Reflection/Lighting. The user can also use optimizations including BSP/QuadTree/OctTree or culling in the X3D scene.

X3D can work with other open source standards including XML, DOM and XPath.

MPEG-1 Parts
MPEG-2 Parts
MPEG-4 Parts
MPEG-7 Parts
MPEG-21 Parts
MPEG-D Parts
MPEG-G Parts
MPEG-H Parts
Other

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.