MIT Press

The MIT Press is a university press affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States).

MIT Press
MIT Press logo (black)
Parent companyMassachusetts Institute of Technology
Founded1932
FounderJames R. Killian, Jr.
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationCambridge, Massachusetts
DistributionTriLiteral (United States)
John Wiley & Sons (international)[1]
Key peopleAmy Brand, director
Publication typesBooks, Academic journals
Official websitemitpress.mit.edu
ASA conference 2008 - 27
Display of publications at conference booth in 2008

History

The MIT Press traces its origins back to 1926 when MIT published under its own name a lecture series entitled Problems of Atomic Dynamics given by the visiting German physicist and later Nobel Prize winner, Max Born. Six years later, MIT's publishing operations were first formally instituted by the creation of an imprint called Technology Press in 1932. This imprint was founded by James R. Killian, Jr., at the time editor of MIT's alumni magazine and later to become MIT president. Technology Press published eight titles independently, then in 1937 entered into an arrangement with John Wiley & Sons in which Wiley took over marketing and editorial responsibilities. In 1962 the association with Wiley came to an end after a further 125 titles had been published. The press acquired its modern name after this separation, and has since functioned as an independent publishing house.[2]

A European marketing office was opened in 1969, and a Journals division was added in 1972. In the late 1970s, responding to changing economic conditions, the publisher narrowed the focus of their catalog to a few key areas, initially architecture, computer science and artificial intelligence, economics, and cognitive science.[2]

In January 2010 the MIT Press published its 9000th title,[2] and in 2012 the Press celebrated its 50th anniversary, including publishing a commemorative booklet on paper and online.[3]

The press co-founded the distributor TriLiteral LLC with Yale University Press and Harvard University Press. TriLiteral was acquired by LSC Communications in 2018.[4]

Business

MIT Press primarily publishes academic titles in the fields of Art and Architecture; Visual and Cultural Studies; Cognitive Science; Philosophy; Linguistics; Computer Science; Economics; Finance and Business; Environmental Science; Political Science; Life Sciences; Neuroscience; New Media; and Science, Technology, and Society.[5]

The MIT Press is a distributor for such publishers as Zone Books[6] and Semiotext(e). In 2000, the MIT Press created CogNet, an online resource for the study of the brain and the cognitive sciences.[7] The MIT Press co-owns the distributor TriLiteral LLC with Harvard University Press and Yale University Press.[8]

In 1981 the MIT Press published its first book under the Bradford Books imprint, Brainstorms: Philosophical Essays on Mind and Psychology by Daniel C. Dennett.

In 2018, the Press and the MIT Media Lab launched the Knowledge Futures Group to develop and deploy open access publishing technology and platforms.

Retail outlet

The MIT Press also operates the MIT Press Bookstore[9] showcasing both its front and backlist titles, along with a large selection of complementary works from other academic and trade publishers. The retail storefront was formerly located next to a subway entrance to Kendall/MIT station in the heart of Kendall Square, but has been temporarily moved to 301 Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge, Massachusetts, a short distance north of the MIT Museum near Central Square. Once extensive construction around its former location is completed, the Bookstore is planned to be returned to a site adjacent to the subway entrance.

The Bookstore offers customized selections from the MIT Press at many conferences and symposia in the Boston area, and sponsors occasional lectures and book signings at MIT.

The Bookstore is also known for its periodic "Warehouse Sales" offering deep discounts on surplus, damaged, and returned books and journals from its own catalog, as well as remaindered books from other publishers.

MIT Press logo

The Press uses a colophon or logo designed by its longtime design director, Muriel Cooper, in 1962.[10] The design is based on a highly-abstracted version of the lower-case letters "mitp", with the ascender of the "t" at the fifth stripe and the descender of the "p" at the sixth stripe the only differentiation.[11] It later served as an important reference point for the 2015 redesign of the MIT Media Lab logo by Pentagram.[10]

List of journals published by the MIT Press

The Arts and Humanities

Economics

International Affairs, History, and Political Science

Science and Technology

Notable Books

  • The Image of the City by Kevin Lynch', 1960[15]
  • Experiencing Architecture by Steen Eiler Rasmussen', 1962[16]
  • Beyond The Melting Pot: The Negroes, Puerto Ricans, Jews, Italians, and Irish of New York City by Nathan Glazer and Daniel P. Moynihan', 1963[17]
  • The Character of Physical Law by Richard Feynman', 1967[18]
  • Bauhaus: Weimar, Dessau, Berlin, Chicago by Hans M. Wingler', 1969[19]
  • The Subjection Of Women, by John Stuart Mill', 1970[20]
  • Theory of Colours by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe', 1970[21]
  • Learning From Las Vegas by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steven Izenour', 1972[22]
  • The Theory of Industrial Organization by Jean Tirole', 1988[23]
  • Made in America: Regaining the Productive Edge by Michael L. Dertouzos, Robert M. Solow and Richard K. Lester', 1989[24]
  • Introduction to Algorithms by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson and Ronald L. Rivest', 1990[25]
  • Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man by Marshall McLuhan', 1994[26]
  • The Society of the Spectacle, by Guy Debord (translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith)', 1994[27]
  • Financial Modeling by Simon Benninga', 1997[28]
  • Out of the Crisis, by W. Edwards Deming', 2000[29]
  • The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics by William R. Easterly', 2001[30]
  • The Language of New Media by Lev Manovich', 2001[31]
  • The Laws of Simplicity by John Maeda', 2006[32]
  • 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School by Matthew Frederick', 2007[33]
  • Deep Learning by Ian Goodfellow, Yoshua Bengio and Aaron Courville', 2016[34]
  • Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein, 2018 [35]

References

  1. ^ "How to Order". mit.edu.
  2. ^ a b c "History | The MIT Press". Retrieved 2012-11-17.
  3. ^ "50 Years of Influential Books and Journal Articles | The MIT Press".
  4. ^ "LSC Buys TriLiteral; Turner Purchases Gürze Books". PublishersWeekly.com. Retrieved 2018-07-08.
  5. ^ "MIT Press Catalogs".
  6. ^ "Zone Books". Zone Books. Retrieved 2018-07-21.
  7. ^ "CogNet FAQ". Archived from the original on 2012-05-21.
  8. ^ "TriLiteral LLC • Book Distribution and Fulfillment Services". TriLiteral.
  9. ^ "The MIT Press Bookstore".
  10. ^ a b Stinson, Liz. "MIT Media Lab Gets a Transforming Logo, Courtesy of Pentagram".
  11. ^ http://www.aiga.org/medalist-murielcooper/ |AIGA profile of Muriel Cooper
  12. ^ "MIT Press Journals". MIT Press Journals. Retrieved 2018-07-21.
  13. ^ "MIT Press Journals". MIT Press Journals. Retrieved 2018-07-21.
  14. ^ "MIT Press Journals". MIT Press Journals. Retrieved 2018-07-21.
  15. ^ "The Image of the City by Kevin Lynch on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  16. ^ "Experiencing Architecture by Steen Eiler Rasmussen on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  17. ^ "Beyond The Melting Pot: The Negroes, Puerto Ricans, Jews, Italians, and Irish of New York City by Nathan Glazer and Daniel P. Moynihan on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  18. ^ "The Character of Physical Law by Richard Feynman on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  19. ^ "Bauhaus: Weimar, Dessau, Berlin, Chicago by Hans M. Wingler on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  20. ^ "The Subjection Of Women, by John Stuart Mill on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  21. ^ "Theory of Colours by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  22. ^ "Learning From Las Vegas by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steven Izenour on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  23. ^ "The Theory of Industrial Organization by Jean Tirole on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  24. ^ "Made in America: Regaining the Productive Edge by Michael L. Dertouzos, Robert M. Solow and Richard K. Lester on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  25. ^ "Introduction to Algorithms by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson and Ronald L. Rivest on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  26. ^ "Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man by Marshall McLuhan on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  27. ^ "The Society of the Spectacle, by Guy Debord (translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith) on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  28. ^ "Financial Modeling by Simon Benninga on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  29. ^ "Out of the Crisis, by W. Edwards Deming on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  30. ^ "The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics by William R. Easterly on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  31. ^ "The Language of New Media by Lev Manovich on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  32. ^ "The Laws of Simplicity by John Maeda on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  33. ^ "101 Things I Learned in Architecture School by Matthew Frederick on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  34. ^ "Deep Learning by Ian Goodfellow, Yoshua Bengio and Aaron Courville on the MIT Press website". Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  35. ^ "Reviewed by Cindy Helms in New York Journal of Books". 2018-10-09. Retrieved 2018-12-11.

External links

Coordinates: 42°21′43.7″N 71°5′8.0″W / 42.362139°N 71.085556°W

Computer Music Journal

Computer Music Journal is a peer-reviewed academic journal that covers a wide range of topics related to digital audio signal processing and electroacoustic music. It is published on-line and in hard copy by MIT Press. The journal is accompanied by an annual CD/DVD that collects audio and video work by various electronic artists. Computer Music Journal was established in 1977. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2016 impact factor of 0.405.

Concept

Concepts are mental representations, abstract objects or abilities that make up the fundamental building blocks of thoughts and beliefs. They play an important role in all aspects of cognition.In contemporary philosophy, there are at least three prevailing ways to understand what a concept is:

Concepts as mental representations, where concepts are entities that exist in the mind (mental objects)

Concepts as abilities, where concepts are abilities peculiar to cognitive agents (mental states)

Concepts as Fregean senses (see sense and reference), where concepts are abstract objects, as opposed to mental objects and mental statesConcepts can be organized into a hierarchy, higher levels of which are termed "superordinate" and lower levels termed "subordinate". Additionally, there is the "basic" or "middle" level at which people will most readily categorize a concept. For example, a basic-level concept would be "chair", with its superordinate, "furniture", and its subordinate, "easy chair".

A concept is instantiated (reified) by all of its actual or potential instances, whether these are things in the real world or other ideas.

Concepts are studied as components of human cognition in the cognitive science disciplines of linguistics, psychology and philosophy, where an ongoing debate asks whether all cognition must occur through concepts. Concepts are used as formal tools or models in mathematics, computer science, databases and artificial intelligence where they are sometimes called classes, schema or categories. In informal use the word concept often just means any idea.

International Security (journal)

International Security is a peer-reviewed academic journal in the field of international and national security. It was founded in 1976 and is edited by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University and published four times a year by MIT Press, both of Cambridge, Massachusetts. The current editor-in-chief is Steven E. Miller (Harvard University).

According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2017 impact factor of 4.135, ranking it 2nd out of 85 journals in the category "International Relations". Each issue has an average length of 208 pages.

Introduction to Algorithms

Introduction to Algorithms is a book by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein. The book has been widely used as the textbook for algorithms courses at many universities and is commonly cited as a reference for algorithms in published papers, with over 10,000 citations documented on CiteSeerX. The book sold half a million copies during its first 20 years. Its fame has led to the common use of the abbreviation "CLRS" (Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, Stein), or, in the first edition, "CLR" (Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest).In the preface, the authors write about how the book was written to be comprehensive and useful in both teaching and professional environments. Each chapter focuses on an algorithm, and discusses its design techniques and areas of application. Instead of using a specific programming language, the algorithms are written in pseudocode. The descriptions focus on the aspects of the algorithm itself, its mathematical properties, and emphasize efficiency.

Jean Tirole

Jean Tirole (born 9 August 1953) is a French professor of economics. He focuses on industrial organization, game theory, banking and finance, and economics and psychology. In 2014 he was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his analysis of market power and regulation.

Journal of Cold War Studies

The Journal of Cold War Studies is a peer-reviewed academic journal on the history of the Cold War. It was established in 1999 and is published by MIT Press for the Harvard Project on Cold War Studies. The journal is issued also under the auspices of the Davis Center for Russian Studies (summer 2005). The editor in chief is Mark Kramer (Harvard University).

Journal of Interdisciplinary History

The Journal of Interdisciplinary History is a peer-reviewed academic journal published four times a year by the MIT Press. It covers a broad range of historical themes and periods, linking history to other academic fields.

Leonardo (journal)

Leonardo is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the MIT Press covering the application of contemporary science and technology to the arts and music.

LexisNexis

LexisNexis Group is a corporation providing computer-assisted legal research (CALR) as well as business research and risk management services.

During the 1970s, LexisNexis pioneered the electronic accessibility of legal and journalistic documents. As of 2006, the company has the world's largest electronic database for legal and public-records related information.

Linguistic Inquiry

Linguistic Inquiry is a peer-reviewed academic journal in generative linguistics published by the MIT Press since 1970. Ever since its foundation, it has been edited by Samuel Jay Keyser. Many seminal linguistic articles first appeared on its pages. The volumes since 1998 are available online via the site of the publisher.

Machine learning

Machine learning (ML) is the scientific study of algorithms and statistical models that computer systems use to effectively perform a specific task without using explicit instructions, relying on patterns and inference instead. It is seen as a subset of artificial intelligence. Machine learning algorithms build a mathematical model of sample data, known as "training data", in order to make predictions or decisions without being explicitly programmed to perform the task. Machine learning algorithms are used in a wide variety of applications, such as email filtering, and computer vision, where it is infeasible to develop an algorithm of specific instructions for performing the task. Machine learning is closely related to computational statistics, which focuses on making predictions using computers. The study of mathematical optimization delivers methods, theory and application domains to the field of machine learning. Data mining is a field of study within machine learning, and focuses on exploratory data analysis through unsupervised learning. In its application across business problems, machine learning is also referred to as predictive analytics.

Minimalist program

In linguistics, the minimalist program (MP) is a major line of inquiry that has been developing inside generative grammar since the early 1990s, starting with a 1993 paper by Noam Chomsky.Chomsky presents MP as a program, not as a theory, following Imre Lakatos's distinction. The MP seeks to be a mode of inquiry characterized by the flexibility of the multiple directions that its minimalism enables. Ultimately, the MP provides a conceptual framework used to guide the development of linguistic theory. In minimalism, Chomsky attempts to approach universal grammar from below—that is, proposing the question "what would be the optimal answer to what the theory of i-Language should be?"

For Chomsky, there are minimalist questions, but the answers can be framed in any theory. Of all these questions, the two that play the most crucial role are:

What is language?

Why does it have the properties it has?

New media art

New media art refers to artworks created with new media technologies, including digital art, computer graphics, computer animation, virtual art, Internet art, interactive art, video games, computer robotics, 3D printing, cyborg art and art as biotechnology. The term differentiates itself by its resulting cultural objects and social events, which can be seen in opposition to those deriving from old visual arts (i.e. traditional painting, sculpture, etc.). This concern with medium is a key feature of much contemporary art and indeed many art schools and major universities now offer majors in "New Genres" or "New Media" and a growing number of graduate programs have emerged internationally. New media art often involves interaction between artist and observer or between observers and the artwork, which responds to them. Yet, as several theorists and curators have noted, such forms of interaction, social exchange, participation, and transformation do not distinguish new media art but rather serve as a common ground that has parallels in other strands of contemporary art practice. Such insights emphasize the forms of cultural practice that arise concurrently with emerging technological platforms, and question the focus on technological media, per se.

New Media concerns are often derived from the telecommunications, mass media and digital electronic modes of delivering the artworks involve, with practices ranging from conceptual to virtual art, performance to installation.

Nick Montfort

Nick Montfort is a poet and professor of digital media at MIT. He has written and written about interactive fiction, collaborated on the blog Grand Text Auto, and developed many digital poems and text generators. His most recent books are The Future (MIT Press, 2017) and The Truelist (computer-generated poetry, Counterpath, 2017). A futures studies reviewer describes The Future as "written by an outsider to the foresight community" who "examines the works of artists, inventors, and designers and how they have imagined the future." The book was reviewed as "striking a balance between planning and poetry ... a sober, tight account of what 'the future' is and has been, as well as how to think and make it." Among Montfort's several computer-generated books is #! (said "shebang"), in which he "chooses the programming languages Python, Ruby, and Perl (the last of which has a documented history as a poetic medium) to create impressions of an ideal—machines based on the rules of language." The book includes a Python version of "Taroko Gorge," which is available online in JavaScript and has been modified by many authors. Some of these "remixes" are collected in The Electronic Literature Collection: Volume 3. Montfort and Ian Bogost wrote Racing the Beam: The Atari Video Computer System (MIT Press, 2009). Montfort also wrote Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction (MIT Press, 2003) and co-edited The Electronic Literature Collection: Volume 1 (ELO, 2006) and The New Media Reader (MIT Press, 2003).

Norbert Wiener

Norbert Wiener (November 26, 1894 – March 18, 1964) was an American mathematician and philosopher. He was a professor of mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). A child prodigy, Wiener later became an early researcher in stochastic and mathematical noise processes, contributing work relevant to electronic engineering, electronic communication, and control systems.

Wiener is considered the originator of cybernetics, a formalization of the notion of feedback, with implications for engineering, systems control, computer science, biology, neuroscience, philosophy, and the organization of society.

Norbert Wiener is credited as being one of the first to theorize that all intelligent behavior was the result of feedback mechanisms, that could possibly be simulated by machines and was an important early step towards the development of modern AI.

October (journal)

October is a peer-reviewed academic journal specializing in contemporary art, criticism, and theory, published by MIT Press.

Racing the Beam

Racing the Beam: The Atari Video Computer System is a book by Ian Bogost and Nick Montfort describing the history and technical challenges of programming for the Atari 2600 video game console.

The New England Quarterly

The New England Quarterly is a peer-reviewed academic journal consisting of articles on New England's cultural, literary, political, and social history. The journal contains essays, interpretations of traditional texts, essay reviews and book reviews. The New England Quarterly was established in 1928 and is published by MIT Press for The New England Quarterly Inc., a nonprofit sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Boston and the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, and supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council. MIT Press began publishing the journal in 2007.

The Review of Economics and Statistics

The Review of Economics and Statistics is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering applied quantitative economics. It was established in 1919 as The Review of Economic Statistics and obtained its current name in 1948.The inaugural issue stated the purpose of the journal to be to:

promote the collection, criticism, and interpretation of economic statistics ... by investigation of the sources and probable accuracy of existing statistics ... and by developing the application to economic statistics of modern methods of statistical analysis which have hitherto been utilized more extensively in other sciences than in economics.The journal is edited at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government and published by MIT Press. Its current editors-in-chief are Amitabh Chandra, Yuriy Gorodnichenko, Bryan S. Graham, Amit K. Khandelwal, Asim Ijaz Khwaja, and Brigitte C. Madrian.

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