Lynn Stalmaster

Lynn Arlen Stalmaster (born November 17, 1927) is an American casting director.

Lynn Stalmaster
BornNovember 17, 1927 (age 91)
NationalityUS
OccupationCasting director
Years active1950-2006
Spouse(s)Gloria McGough (1956-?) (divorced)
Shirley A. Alexander (1962-1972) (divorced) (2 children)
ChildrenLincoln Stalmaster (b. 1966)
Lara Stalmaster
Parent(s)Irvin A. Stalmaster
Estelle Lapidus Stalmaster
FamilyHal Stalmaster (brother)

Early life

Stalmaster was born to a Jewish family, the son of Irvin A. and Estelle Lapidus Stalmaster.[1] His father was the first person of Jewish descent as well as the youngest person appointed to the District Court of Nebraska.[2] He was also active in the local Jewish community serving as president of the Omaha B'nai Brith.[3] Stalmaster attended Dundee Elementary School in Midtown Omaha.[1] In 1938, his family moved to Beverly Hills, California where he attended Beverly Hills High School.[4] He overcame his shyness by acting in high school and college.[1] After serving in the U.S. Army, he received a degree in Theater Arts from UCLA.[4]

Career

After school, Stalmaster got his first job in show business as an actor, appearing in the war movies The Steel Helmet (1951) and The Flying Leathernecks (1951). He also acted in the TV series Big Town but soon became involved in the casting department of the same show. Stalmaster established himself quickly as a solid casting director, finding steady work in both television and motion pictures. The name Lynn Stalmaster became well known especially to cinema-goers of the 1970s, when he was credited with casting more than 60 movies of the decade, among them; Fiddler on the Roof, Harold and Maude, The Cowboys, Deliverance, Rollerball, Silver Streak, Black Sunday, Coming Home, Convoy, The Rose, Superman and Being There.

Stalmaster was also responsible for casting TV-shows like Combat!, Gunsmoke, The Untouchables, My Favorite Martian (S01,E01)' as well as Academy Award winning movies In the Heat of the Night, The Thomas Crown Affair, The Right Stuff and Brian De Palma's 1987 motion picture version of The Untouchables.

He is the older brother of actor Hal Stalmaster, who played the title role in the 1957 Walt Disney film Johnny Tremain, a young silversmith in the American Revolution.

In 2016, he received an Academy Honorary Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Filmography as casting director (partial list)

References

  1. ^ a b c The Jewish Press (Omaha): "Hollywood insiders return Home for Jewish Reunion" by Sherrie Saag July 30, 2014
  2. ^ The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle: "Young Jewish Lawyer appointed Judge of Dist. Court, Nebraska" April 27, 1928 - Page 17
  3. ^ Jewish Telegraph Agency: "Stalmaster is Appointed Judge in Nebraska Court" April 17, 1928
  4. ^ a b Oscar Biographies: "Lynn Stalmaster" retrieved July 22, 2017

External links

89th Academy Awards

The 89th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2016, and took place on February 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, at 5:30 p.m. PST. During the ceremony, AMPAS presented Academy Awards (commonly referred to as Oscars) in 24 categories. The ceremony, televised in the United States by ABC, was produced by Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd and directed by Glenn Weiss. Comedian Jimmy Kimmel hosted the ceremony for the first time.In related events, the Academy held its 8th Annual Governors Awards ceremony at the Grand Ballroom of the Hollywood and Highland Center on November 12, 2016. On February 11, 2017, in a ceremony at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, the Academy Scientific and Technical Awards were presented by hosts John Cho and Leslie Mann.In the main ceremony, Moonlight won three awards including Best Picture, after La La Land was mistakenly announced as a winner, as well as Best Supporting Actor for Mahershala Ali. La La Land won six awards, the most for the evening, out of its record-tying fourteen nominations, including Best Actress for Emma Stone and Best Director for Damien Chazelle. Hacksaw Ridge and Manchester by the Sea won two awards each with Casey Affleck winning Best Actor for the latter. Viola Davis won the Best Supporting Actress honor for Fences. The telecast garnered 33 million viewers in the United States.

Anne V. Coates

Anne Voase Coates (12 December 1925 – 8 May 2018) was a British film editor with a more than 60-year-long career. She was perhaps best known as the editor of David Lean's epic film Lawrence of Arabia in 1962, for which she won an Oscar. Coates was nominated five times for the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for the films Lawrence of Arabia, Becket (1963), The Elephant Man (1980), In the Line of Fire (1993) and Out of Sight (1998). In an industry where women accounted for only 16 percent of all editors working on the top 250 films of 2004, and 80 percent of the films had absolutely no women on their editing teams at all, Coates thrived as a top film editor. She was awarded BAFTA's highest honour, a BAFTA Fellowship, in February 2007 and was given an Academy Honorary Award, which are popularly known as a Lifetime Achievement Oscar, in November 2016 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

B. B. Kahane

Benjamin "BB" Kahane (November 30, 1891 – September 18, 1960) was an American film producer.

Billy Redden

Billy Redden (born 1956) is an American actor, best known for his role as a backwoods mountain boy in the 1972 film Deliverance. He played Lonnie, a banjo-playing teenager in north Georgia, who played the noted "Dueling Banjos" with Drew Ballinger (Ronny Cox). The film was critically acclaimed and received nominations for awards in several categories.

Casting By

Casting By is a 2012 American documentary film directed by Tom Donahue. It combines over 230 interviews, extensive archival footage, animated stills and documents to tell the untold tale of the Hollywood casting director, Marion Dougherty. Dougherty died before the film's release; it is dedicated to her memory.The film had its international premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival and its US premiere at the New York Film Festival in 2012. It was acquired by HBO Documentary Films in Toronto and had its US Broadcast premiere as part of the HBO Documentary Summer Series on August 5, 2013. In September 2013, the US theatrical rights were acquired by Submarine Deluxe.

Daniel J. Bloomberg

Daniel J. Bloomberg (July 4, 1905 – August 14, 1984) was an Academy Award-winning audio engineer. Bloomberg's first Hollywood credit was in 1934, his last his Oscar-nominated work on John Ford’s The Quiet Man 18 years later. In the intervening time, he worked on several films in the Dick Tracy and Zorro series.

Although his work was mainly confined to B pictures, Bloomberg did enjoy the distinction of winning five technical awards from the Academy, as well as eight Academy Award nominations. He also won an Honorary Award in 1945 for designing and building a musical scoring auditorium with state-of-the-art acoustics.

Bloomberg was married to award-winning British actress and beauty queen Eugenie Prescott Bloomberg (born: 1909, Cheshire, England, UK) whose film credits include The Rising Generation (1928), The Flying Squad (1929) and Diggers (1931).

Forbidden Games

Forbidden Games (French: Jeux interdits), is a 1952 French war drama film directed by René Clément and based on François Boyer's novel Jeux Interdits.

While not initially successful in France, the film was a hit elsewhere. It won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, a Special Award as Best Foreign Language Film in the United States, and a Best Film from any Source at the British Academy Film Awards.

Gate of Hell (film)

Gate of Hell (地獄門, Jigokumon, "Gate of Jigoku") is a 1953 Japanese jidaigeki film directed by Teinosuke Kinugasa. It tells the story of a samurai (Kazuo Hasegawa) who tries to marry a woman (Machiko Kyō) he rescues, only to discover that she is married. Filmed using Eastmancolor, Gate of Hell was Daiei Film's first color film and the first Japanese color film to be released outside Japan.

Governors Awards

The Governors Awards presentation is an annual award ceremony hosted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), at the Grand Ballroom of the Hollywood and Highland Center, in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles, California. Three awards that signify lifetime achievement within the film industry – the Academy Honorary Award, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, and the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award – are presented at this ceremony. The first Governors Awards ceremony was held on November 14, 2009. Prior to this, these three awards were formally presented during the main Academy Awards ceremony, which now conducts a short mention and appearance of the awards recipients after displaying a montage of the Governors Awards presentation. In the years since, the awards have gained prominence as a major red-carpet destination and industry event.

Hal Needham

Hal Brett Needham (March 6, 1931 – October 25, 2013) was an American stuntman, film director, actor and writer. He is best known for his frequent collaborations with actor Burt Reynolds, usually in films involving fast cars, such as Smokey and the Bandit, Hooper, The Cannonball Run and Stroker Ace.

Joseph A. Ball

Joseph Arthur Ball (August 16, 1894 – August 27, 1951) was an American inventor, physicist, and executive at Technicolor. He was the technical director of the first color movie Becky Sharp, and a recipient of an Academy Honorary Award at the 11th Academy Awards for his contributions to color film photography. He held many patents in color photography and was credited with creating the three-component process.

Louis Mesenkop

Louis Mesenkop (February 6, 1903 – February 19, 1974) was an American sound engineer. He won two Academy Awards for Best Special Effects and was nominated for another in the same category. Mesenkop was part of the production team who received an Academy Honorary Award at the 11th Academy Awards for their efforts on the Paramount film Spawn of the North.

Monsieur Vincent

Monsieur Vincent is a 1947 French film about Vincent de Paul, the 17th-century priest and charity worker. It depicts his struggle to help the poor in the face of obstacles such as the Black Death.

In 1949, it won an honorary Academy Award as the best foreign language film released in the United States in 1948. The Vatican placed it amongst their list of approved films under the category of Religion due to its thematic nature in 1995. Pierre Fresnay portrayed Vincent.

Nathan Levinson

Nathan Levinson (July 15, 1888 – October 18, 1952) was an American sound engineer. He won an Oscar in the category Sound Recording for the film Yankee Doodle Dandy and was nominated for 16 more in the same category. He was also nominated seven times in the category Best Special Effects.

The Oscar statue that Levinson won for Yankee Doodle Dandy was sold for nearly $90,000 at an auction in Dallas in July 2011.

Ray Abrams (animator)

Ray Abrams (April 19, 1906 — June 4, 1981) was an American animator and director. Abrams worked on several major animations during the 1930s. He began his career as an animator at MGM Studios, Walter Lantz Productions and Hanna-Barbera.Abrams was born in 1906 and was raised on a property in Salt Leke City, Utah. He worked in various animations during the 1930s, he began his career as an animator and director of MGM Studios, Walter Lantz Productions and Hanna-Barbera. Around 1948, Abrams joined MGM, where he was an animator of What Price Fleadom (1948).

Between 1953 and 1955, he worked briefly in the studio of Walter Lantz Productions, "Woody Woodpecker" and "Chilly Willy".

Thomas Armat

Thomas J. Armat (October 25, 1866 – September 30, 1948) was an American mechanic and inventor, a pioneer of cinema best known through the co-invention of the Edison Vitascope.

W. Howard Greene

William Howard Greene (August 16, 1895, River Point, Rhode Island - February 28, 1956, Los Angeles, California) was an American cinematographer.

William Garity

William E. "Bill" Garity (April 2, 1899 – September 16, 1971) was an American inventor and audio engineer who attended the Pratt Institute before going to work for Lee De Forest around 1921. Garity worked with DeForest on the Phonofilm sound-on-film system until 1927, when Pat Powers hired Garity to develop a sound system that Powers called Powers Cinephone.

Garity is best known for his employment at Walt Disney Studios, which used the Cinephone system in the late 1920s and early 30s. In 1937, also at the Disney Studios, Garity developed the multiplane camera. Ub Iwerks, having left Disney to work at his own studio, developed an unrelated multiplane camera, during this same time period.In 1940, Garity developed Fantasound, an early stereophonic surround sound system for Disney's Fantasia. After leaving the Disney studio, Garity later became vice president and production manager for Walter Lantz Productions. He was inducted in the Disney Legends program in 1999.

Y. Frank Freeman

Young Frank Freeman (14 December 1890 – 6 February 1969) was an American film company executive for Paramount Pictures. Freeman was born in Greenville, Georgia, and graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1910. In addition to his work with Paramount, he also worked in the fields of banking, higher education, and athletics.He was the first winner of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1957. He was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on February 8, 1960. He died in California and was buried at Westview Cemetery in Atlanta.

1928–1950
1951–1975
1976–2000
2001–present

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