Lynn Dickey

Clifford Lynn Dickey (born October 19, 1949) is a retired National Football League quarterback, who played for the Houston Oilers and the Green Bay Packers in the 1970s and 1980s.

Lynn Dickey
refer to caption
Dickey (right) signing autographs
with center Larry McCarren in 2007
No. 10, 12
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:October 19, 1949 (age 69)
Paola, Kansas
Career information
High school:Osawatomie (KS)
College:Kansas State
NFL Draft:1971 / Round: 3 / Pick: 56
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:141–179
Yards:23,322
QB Rating:70.9
Player stats at NFL.com

High school

Born in Paola, Kansas, and raised in Osawatomie, southwest of Kansas City, Dickey led Osawatomie High School to a state championship and graduated in 1967. Its football stadium is named after him, and his number "10" was retired by OHS in January 1971.[1]

College career

Dickey was recruited to Kansas State University in Manhattan, and he soon became the top quarterback in the Big Eight Conference. Following his senior season in 1970, Dickey finished tenth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy and was named MVP of the North–South Shrine Game.[2] His 6,208 career passing yards was the record at Kansas State for 38 years, until passed by Josh Freeman in 2008.

Professional career

Houston Oilers

Dickey was selected in the third round of the 1971 NFL draft, 56th overall, by the Houston Oilers,[3] where he played four seasons, splitting time with fellow 1971 draft pick Dan Pastorini (third overall).[4] He and Pastorini were in competition for the starting quarterback role in 1972, and Dickey was having a good preseason. However, he suffered the first in a long line of serious injuries throughout his career, a dislocated and broken hip in the fourth preseason game, which cost him the rest of the year.[5] Dickey started ten games with the Oilers, winning two overall, including Houston's lone win in the 1973 season.[6]

Green Bay Packers

In 1976 he was packaged in a trade to the Green Bay Packers involving John Hadl.[7] His Packers career got off to a rocky start. Dickey suffered a broken leg in 1977, causing him to miss two full calendar years. But by 1980 he was back as the starter. Dickey led the Packers to the 16-team playoffs in the strike-shortened 1982 season. The Packers won the opening round after Dickey went 19 of 26 (73%) for 286 yards with 4 touchdowns and no interceptions in a 41–16 triumph over the St. Louis Cardinals.[8] Green Bay was eliminated the following week by the Dallas Cowboys in the divisional round after Dickey went 24 of 37 for 274 yards with 1 touchdown and 3 interceptions as the team fell 37–26.[9]

Perhaps the high point of Dickey's NFL career came in 1983 when he powered the Packers' offense to a then-team record 429 points.[10][11] His 4,458 yards that season served as the team record until being surpassed by Aaron Rodgers in 2011,[12] and threw a career-best 32 touchdowns, the most in the NFL in 1983.[13] Dickey was named second-team All-NFC behind Joe Theismann. Dickey's Packers had beaten Theismann's Super Bowl champion Washington Redskins in a thrilling Monday Night Football game earlier that season (Washington kicker Mark Moseley missed a field goal in the closing seconds, preserving the Packers' 48–47 win).[14] The game is included in NFL Network's program "Top Ten Quarterback Duels".

Dickey retired from professional football prior to the 1986 season, after he was waived late in training camp.[15][16][17] He holds Packers records for highest completion percentage in a game with a minimum of 20 attempts (19-21, 90.48%, versus New Orleans on December 13, 1981).[18] His record for most passing yards in a 1980 game (418 versus Tampa Bay on October 12) was broken by Matt Flynn on January 1, 2012 with 480 yards. (Aaron Rodgers had 422 in a playoff game against the Arizona Cardinals[19]); and highest average gain in a season (9.21 yards per attempt in 1983[20]). The latter is an NFL single-season record for quarterbacks with 400 or more attempts.

Personal life

After retiring from football, Dickey relocated to the greater Kansas City area where he opened a football-themed restaurant. Dickey has three grown daughters; Natalie, Meredith, and Elizabeth and resides in Leawood, Kansas. He then worked for the popular Kansas City AM station Sports Radio 810 on the show "Crunch Time", airing at 9:00 a.m. He now works at Serve You, a Pharmacy Benefit Management company home based in Milwaukee.

Honors

In 1996, when the Big Eight expanded to the Big 12 Conference, the Associated Press named Dickey as the All-Time Big Eight Quarterback. Kansas State University has retired the No. 11 to jointly honor Dickey and his successor at KSU, Steve Grogan. It is the only number retired by Kansas State's football program.

Dickey is a member of the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame and the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame.

References

  1. ^ "Osawatamie High to retire Dickey's old prep number". Lawrence Journal-World. Kansas. Associated Press. January 28, 1971. p. 10.
  2. ^ Mizell, Hubert (December 27, 1970). "Dickey leads North to 28-7 Shrine win". Daily News. Bowling Green, Kentucky. p. 18.
  3. ^ "Kansas State passing ace signs Houston Oiler pact". Victoria Advocate. Texas. Associated Press. February 25, 1971. p. 2B.
  4. ^ 1971, 1973-75
  5. ^ "Houston Wins, But Loses Lynn Dickey". The Paris News. Paris, Texas. Associated Press. August 25, 1972. p. 8.
  6. ^ The Oilers went 1–13 in 1973, Pro-Football-Reference.com: Lynn Dickey
  7. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=4IA0AAAAIBAJ&sjid=Vo0EAAAAIBAJ&pg=6860,469255&hl=en
  8. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/198301080gnb.htm
  9. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/198301160dal.htm
  10. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/gnb/1983.htm
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 4, 2010. Retrieved January 21, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/stats/_/id/8439/aaron-rodgers
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 8, 2009. Retrieved January 21, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/198310170gnb.htm
  15. ^ Lea, Bud (September 2, 1986). "Pack waives Dickey, Coffman". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 2.
  16. ^ Van Sickle, Gary (September 2, 1986). "Dickey waves goodby again". Milwaukee Journal. p. 1C.
  17. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/D/DickLy00.htm?redir
  18. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/198112130nor.htm
  19. ^ List of NFL quarterbacks who have passed for 400 or more yards in a game#Every 400-yard game in date order
  20. ^ http://prod.static.packers.clubs.nfl.com/assets/docs/media-guide/2011packers_337-592.pdf

External links

1968 Kansas State Wildcats football team

The 1968 Kansas State Wildcats football team represented Kansas State University in the 1968 NCAA University Division football season. The team's head football coach was Vince Gibson. The Wildcats played their home games in KSU Stadium.

1968 was a significant year in Wildcat football history. KSU Stadium debuted as the new home for the football team, which moved from Memorial Stadium. The team was led by sophomore quarterback Lynn Dickey and finished the season as the best passing offense in the Big Eight.

1968 was also significant for the fact that the Wildcats were ranked for only the second time in school history (the first since 1953), and for the first time in the AP Poll. The team was ranked #20 going in its game against #4 Penn State. The Wildcats went on to lose the game, 25–9, and would not be ranked the rest of the season, although they would return to the rankings in the 1969 season.

1968 was also the last time the Wildcats beat Nebraska until the 1998 season, and the last time K-State beat Nebraska in Lincoln until 2003.

1969 Kansas State Wildcats football team

The 1969 Kansas State Wildcats football team represented Kansas State University in the 1969 NCAA University Division football season. The team's head football coach was Vince Gibson. The Wildcats played their home games in KSU Stadium.

The team was again led by quarterback Lynn Dickey and finished the season ranked as the top passing offense in the Big Eight Conference for the second straight year. Kansas State also led the Big Eight in rushing defense. Despite the good statistics, 1969 saw the Wildcats finish with an even record of 5–5, and a 3–4 record in the Big Eight. The Wildcats did, however, post the school's first victory over a ranked team, rolling over #11 Oklahoma, 59–21.

1970 Kansas State Wildcats football team

The 1970 Kansas State Wildcats football team represented Kansas State University in the 1970 NCAA University Division football season. The team's head football coach was Vince Gibson. The Wildcats played their home games in KSU Stadium.

Senior quarterback Lynn Dickey led the team to a third straight season as the top-rated passing offense in the Big Eight Conference. Kansas State also led the conference in total defense, and posted its first win against a top-ten team, beating #8 Colorado. The Wildcats went into the final conference game of the season against Nebraska ranked #20 and playing for the Big Eight championship. The #4-ranked Cornhuskers throttled Kansas State 5113 in the game. Kansas State did not return to the national rankings again until the 1993 season.

The team finished with a winning record in conference play for the first time since 1953. After the season Gibson was named coach of the year by the Big Eight.

1976 Green Bay Packers season

The 1976 Green Bay Packers season was their 58th season overall and their 56th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 5–9 record under coach Bart Starr, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division. The Packers struggled, and finished in last place in the NFC Central with a 5-9 record, as the Quarterback position began to resemble a revolving door, as Lynn Dickey became the latest young Quarterback to struggle with Interceptions.

1977 Green Bay Packers season

The 1977 Green Bay Packers season was their 59th season overall and their 57th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 4–10 record under coach Bart Starr, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division. The Packers struggled with injuries and continued to be among the worst teams in the NFL posting a horrendous 4-10 record, during the season Quarterbacks Lynn Dickey and David Whitehurst combined to throw 21 Interceptions while just connecting on six Touchdown Passes. they only scored 134 points. 2nd worst

In the league (103 by the 2-12 buccaneers)

1982 Green Bay Packers season

The 1982 Green Bay Packers season was their 64th season overall and their 62nd season in the National Football League and shortened due to a players strike. The club posted a 5–3–1 record under coach Bart Starr. Due to the strike, the NFL ignored division standing and placed eight teams from each conference into the playoffs. The Packers finished the season in third place which earned them a playoff berth. The Packers beat the Cardinals 41–16 in the first round, but lost to the Dallas Cowboys 37–26 in the second. Their playoff berth was the first for the Packers in ten seasons, and their only playoff win from 1968 to 1992.

The strike prevented both games of the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league. It also led to Milwaukee becoming the Packers primary home by happenstance, as three of their four regular season home games were played at Milwaukee County Stadium.

1983 Green Bay Packers season

The 1983 Green Bay Packers season was their 65th season overall and their 63rd in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under ninth-year head coach Bart Starr to finish second in the NFC Central division. The team set an NFL record for most overtime games played in one season with five, winning two and losing three. On Monday Night Football in October, Green Bay defeated the Washington Redskins, 48–47, in the highest-scoring game in MNF history. It was voted one of the ten best Packer games and is featured on the NFL Films collection, "The Green Bay Packers Greatest Games."

Green Bay hovered around the .500 mark all season. Entering their final regular season game on December 18 at Chicago, the Packers (8–7) could secure a playoff berth with a victory. Green Bay scored a touchdown to take a one-point lead with just over three minutes in the game, and Chicago running back Walter Payton was sidelined with a wrist injury. The Bears returned the kickoff to their 38 and drove fifty yards, down to the Packer twelve, with 1:17 remaining. Although Green Bay had all three of its timeouts, they opted not to use any, and the Bears kicked a winning 22-yard field goal with ten seconds on the clock. Green Bay fumbled away the ensuing kickoff, and the Los Angeles Rams (9–7) gained the final playoff slot.Starr was fired the following day by team president Robert Parins, ending a 26-year association with the team as a player and coach. Former player Forrest Gregg, the head coach of the Cincinnati Bengals, was hired before the end of the week, announced on Christmas Eve. Gregg had led the Bengals to Super Bowl XVI two years earlier, but had less success in his four seasons in Green Bay, then left for his alma mater SMU in Dallas in January 1988.

1983 Washington Redskins season

The 1983 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 52nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 47th in Washington, D.C.. The season began with the team trying to win consecutive Super Bowls, following their victory in Super Bowl XVII against the Miami Dolphins. Washington's 14–2 record was the best in the NFL. Though the Redskins did win their second-consecutive NFC Championship they were blown out by the Los Angeles Raiders in Super Bowl XVIII, 9–38.

The Redskins' 541 points scored and +209 point differential was the best in the league, with the 541 points setting an NFL record at the time. The 1983 Redskins also had a turnover margin of +43, an NFL record. Washington was the first team since the merger to record more than 60 takeaways (61).This season is cornerback Darrell Green's first in the league. He would spend the next 19 years with the team.

1984 Green Bay Packers season

The 1984 Green Bay Packers season was their 66th season overall and their 64th in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under new coach Forrest Gregg, earning them a second-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1984 San Diego Chargers season

The 1984 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 15th season in the National Football League (NFL), its 25th overall. The Team improveed on their 6–10 record in 1983 to 7-9. Despite winning seven games, the Chargers failed to win a single game within their division.

Before the second game of the season against the Seattle Seahawks, running back Chuck Muncie missed the team's charter flight from San Diego. He told Chargers coach Don Coryell that he was late because vandals slashed the four tires on his car, but Coryell did not believe him. Muncie arrived in Seattle, but he was sent back to San Diego and did not play. Two days later, he was traded to the Miami Dolphins for a second-round draft pick; however, a urinalysis given by Miami detected cocaine, and the trade was voided. Afterwards, Muncie entered an Arizona drug rehabilitation center for a month. On November 15, he was suspended indefinitely by the NFL; he never played another NFL game.

1985 Green Bay Packers season

The 1985 Green Bay Packers season was their 67th season overall and their 65th in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under coach Forrest Gregg, the same record from the previous year. The Packers earned a second-place finish in the NFC Central division.

Cowboys–Packers rivalry

The Cowboys–Packers rivalry is a professional American football rivalry in the National Football League (NFL) between the Dallas Cowboys and the Green Bay Packers. It is one of the best known intra-conference rivalry games in the NFL. The two teams do not play every year; instead, they play once every three years due to the NFL's rotating division schedules, or if the two teams finish in the same place in their respective divisions, they would play the ensuing season. The rivalry has also resulted in notable playoff games. Additionally, the Packers won Super Bowl XLV in AT&T Stadium.

As of the end of the 2017 season, the all-time series record is 19–17 Packers, including a 4–4 postseason record against the Cowboys. Green Bay is one of only four NFL teams with a winning overall record against Dallas (along with the Baltimore Ravens, Cleveland Browns and Denver Broncos), and the only NFC team with that distinction.

Don Majkowski

Donald "Majik" Vincent Majkowski (born February 25, 1964) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers, Indianapolis Colts, and Detroit Lions.

Kansas State Wildcats football statistical leaders

The Kansas State Wildcats football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Kansas State Wildcats football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Wildcats represent Kansas State University in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although Kansas State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1896, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1949. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1949, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Wildcats have played in 10 bowl games since then, allowing players in those seasons to accumulate additional statistics.

All of the Wildcats' ten highest seasons in total offensive yards have come since the year 1998.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Larry McCarren

Larry Anthony McCarren (born November 9, 1951 in Park Forest, Illinois) is a former American football player for twelve seasons in the National Football League with the Green Bay Packers. McCarren had a long career as the Packers' starting center. He was named to the Pro Bowl in 1982 and 1983. After his playing career ended, he was inducted in the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.

He began a television and radio broadcasting career in 1988 at WFRV-TV and he was named the Wisconsin Sportscaster of the Year four times. McCarren has been working on the Packers Radio Network as the color commentator for the Packers' radio broadcasts since 1995.

List of Green Bay Packers starting quarterbacks

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) and are the third-oldest franchise in the National Football League (NFL). The club was founded in 1919 by coach, player, and future Hall of Fame inductee Curly Lambeau and sports and telegraph editor George Whitney Calhoun. The Packers competed against local teams for two seasons before entering the NFL in 1921.

The Packers have had 46 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Packers' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees Curly Lambeau, Tony Canadeo, Arnie Herber, Bart Starr and Brett Favre. The team's first starting quarterback was Norm Barry, while the longest serving was Brett Favre. The Packers' starting quarterback for the 2018 season was Aaron Rodgers, who was playing in his 14th season in the NFL.

They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Packers.

List of Tennessee Titans starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Titans.

Randy Wright

Randall Steven Wright (born January 12, 1961) is a former professional American football quarterback and color commentator who played for the Green Bay Packers from 1984 to 1988 and covered Big Ten football for ESPN for 12 years.

Snow Bowl (1985)

The Snow Bowl was a National Football League game played on December 1, 1985, between the Green Bay Packers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisconsin. It is known for its heavy snow. Only 19,856 were in attendance, with over 36,000 "no-shows", the most in Packers history (though due to the game selling out well in advance, it was not blacked out on local television, nor has any Packers home game since 1973 been blacked out, with one exception, due to a sell-out streak dating back to the early 1960s). About two thirds of the stadium was empty. 12 inches of snow fell before the game and another four to five inches fell during the game.The game itself saw the Packers dominate the Buccaneers en route to a 21–0 victory. Despite four turnovers, the Packers offense gained 512 total yards on 31 first downs, with the Buccaneers recording only 65 yards on 5 first downs. Packers wide receiver James Lofton received passes totaling over 100 yards from quarterback Lynn Dickey by halftime. Packers defensive end Alphonso Carreker sacked Buccaneers quarterback and future Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinee Steve Young a then team-record four times. It was Young's second game in the league after he left the USFL.

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