Lyn Lary

Lynford Horbart Lary (January 28, 1906 – January 9, 1973), nicknamed "Broadway", was an American professional baseball shortstop. He played twelve seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Washington Senators, St. Louis Browns, Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers, and St. Louis Cardinals.[1]

In a 12-season career, Lary posted a .269 batting average with 38 home runs and 526 RBIs in 1,302 games played.

A well-traveled shortstop, Lary played for six different teams in a span of twelve years, including two stints with the St. Louis Browns and playing for three teams in 1939. A good defensive player, he had good hands with a strong arm and was competent on the double play. Primarily a singles hitter, his hustle on the bases was shown by taking an extra base or for breaking up a double play. He ended his career with a 1.50 walk-to-strikeout ratio (705-to-470).

Lary debuted with the New York Yankees in 1929, finishing with a .309 average. The next season, he hit .289, and .280 in 1931. That season, he collected 107 RBIs, the most ever by a Yankees shortstop, and was one of six Yankees to have at least 100 runs scored. Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Ben Chapman, Earle Combs and Joe Sewell were the others. Lary also had career-numbers in home runs (10) and triples (nine).

From 1934 through 1936, Lary divided his playing time between the Yankees, Boston Red Sox, St, Louis Browns and Washington Senators. Before the 1935 season, he was traded by the Red Sox to the Washington Senators in exchange for future Hall of Famer Joe Cronin. Playing for the 1936 Browns, he hit .289 with 112 runs and led the American League with 37 stolen bases and 155 games played. In 1937 with the Cleveland Indians, he batted .290 with 110 runs and posted career-highs in hits (187) and doubles (46).

In 1939, Lary started with Cleveland, was traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers in the midseason, then returned to St. Louis for the rest of the year. He retired in 1940, after a part-time season for the Browns.

Lary died in Downey, California, at age 66.

Lyn Lary
LynLaryGoudeycard
Shortstop
Born: January 28, 1906
Armona, California
Died: January 9, 1973 (aged 66)
Downey, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 11, 1929, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
August 7, 1940, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average.269
Home runs38
Runs batted in526
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ "Lyn Lary Statistics and History". "baseball-reference.com. Retrieved May 20, 2017.

External links

1929 New York Yankees season

The 1929 New York Yankees season was the team's 27th season in New York and its 29th overall. The team finished with a record of 88–66, finishing in second place, 18 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. This ended a streak of three straight World Series appearances for the club. New York was managed by Miller Huggins until his death on September 25. They played at Yankee Stadium.

1930 New York Yankees season

The 1930 New York Yankees season was their 28th season. The team finished with a record of 86–68, finishing 16 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Bob Shawkey. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1931 New York Yankees season

The 1931 New York Yankees season was the team's 29th season in New York and its 31st season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–59, finishing 13.5 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. This team is notable for holding the modern day Major League record for team runs scored in a season with 1,067 (6.88 per game average).

1932 New York Yankees season

The 1932 New York Yankees season was the team's 30th season in New York, and its 32nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 107–47, winning their seventh pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by future Hall of Famer Joe McCarthy. A record nine future Hall of Famers played on the team (Earle Combs, Bill Dickey, Lou Gehrig, Lefty Gomez, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Red Ruffing, Babe Ruth, Joe Sewell).

The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Chicago Cubs. They are the only major-league team ever to go an entire season without being shut out.

1933 New York Yankees season

The 1933 New York Yankees season was the team's 31st season in New York and its 33rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–59, finishing 7 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1934 Boston Red Sox season

The 1934 Boston Red Sox season was the 34th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 76 losses.

1934 New York Yankees season

The 1934 New York Yankees season was the team's 32nd season in New York and its 34th season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 7 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. It would also be the final year Babe Ruth would play as a Yankee.

1935 St. Louis Browns season

The 1935 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 65 wins and 87 losses.

1935 Washington Senators season

The 1935 Washington Senators won 67 games, lost 86, and finished in sixth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1936 Major League Baseball season

The 1936 Major League Baseball season.

1936 St. Louis Browns season

The 1936 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 57 wins and 95 losses.

1937 Cleveland Indians season

The 1937 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 83–71, 19 games behind the New York Yankees.

1938 Cleveland Indians season

The 1938 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 13 games behind the New York Yankees.

1939 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1939 Brooklyn Dodgers started the year with a new manager, Leo Durocher, who became both the team's manager and starting shortstop. They also became the first New York NL team to have a regular radio broadcast, with Red Barber handing the announcers job, and the first team to have a television broadcast (during their August 26 home game doubleheaders against the Reds, both of which WNBT covered for the NBC network). The team finished in third place, showing some improvement over the previous seasons.

1939 Cleveland Indians season

The 1939 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 13 games behind the New York Yankees.

1940 St. Louis Browns season

The 1940 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 67 wins and 87 losses.

Harry Rice

Harry Francis Rice (November 22, 1901 – January 1, 1971), was an outfielder for the St. Louis Browns (1923–27), Detroit Tigers (1928–30), New York Yankees (1930), Washington Senators (1931) and Cincinnati Reds (1933).

At his peak, he was a highly regarded Major League Baseball player. He broke into the big leagues with the St. Louis Browns, located just a few hours from his home in southern Illinois, making it possible for family to occasionally travel to watch him play. Rice hailed from near the town of Ware, Illinois. His hometown is often listed as Ware Station, Illinois. He attended Mound City High School in Mound City, Illinois.

Rice made his big league debut on April 18, 1923. He joined the St. Louis Browns at a time of high expectations. After a stellar performance by the 1922 Browns and with star player and future Hall of Famer George Sisler, their owner predicted a World Series would soon come to Sportsman’s Park. Seating capacity was increased by almost one-third. Rice’s arrival was important as Sisler was forced to miss the entire 1923 season due to double vision resulting from sinusitis. Rice’s batting average of .359 for the Browns in 1925 was the sixth-best in the American League that season, and Rice placed fifth in the voting for the league's Most Valuable Player. He enjoyed another good season and received MVP consideration in 1926, ending with a .313 average and a career-best 181 hits. Sportsman’s did host a World Series in 1926, but it was the Browns’ tenants, the upstart St. Louis Cardinals who beat the Yankees and captured their first World Series title. Rice had another solid season for the Browns in 1927 before being traded to Detroit in December 1927. In 1928, hit .302 and had a career best 20 stolen bases for the Tigers. His .304 average and 97 runs in 1929 again earned some MVP consideration. He was traded again on May 30, 1930 with two other players for a pair of well-known Yankees stars, infielder Mark Koenig and pitcher Waite Hoyt. He formed part of a formidable outfield that also included future Hall of Famers Babe Ruth and Earle Combs. The 1930 season turned out to be Rice's only year as a Yankee. He appeared in 100 games, batting .298 in a lineup that also included Lou Gehrig. Rice appeared in 47 games for the Washington Senators in 1931 and did not appear in the majors in 1932. His last Major League season was in 1933 with the Cincinnati Reds.

Legendary St. Louis sportswriter Bob Broeg recalled Rice as a premier defender with a very strong throwing arm. He was predominantly an outfielder, appearing in over 7,800 innings in the outfield, usually in center or right field. However, Rice has the rare distinction of playing every position, except pitcher, during his career. Yankees historians recall Rice’s defense as an opposing player from a play in 1931 that turned a Gehrig home run into a triple in the record books. With a runner on base, Gehrig homered to center field. The ball caromed back so quickly to Rice, playing outfield for the Washington Senators, that the baserunner, Lyn Lary, mistakenly thought Rice had caught it. Lary ran to the dugout instead of crossing home plate. Gehrig was awarded a triple instead of a home run.

Over 10 seasons, Rice's offensive statistics were: 1,034 Games, 3,740 At Bats, 620 Runs, 1,118 Hits, 186 Doubles, 63 Triples, 48 Home Runs, 501 RBI, 59 Stolen Bases, 376 Walks, .299 Batting Average, .368 On-base percentage, .421 Slugging Percentage, 1,574 Total Bases and 99 Sacrifice Hits. He hit .300 or better 5 times in his major league career.

He died in Portland, Oregon at the age of 69.

Lary

Lary is a surname, given name, or nickname, and may refer to:

As a surname:

Al Lary (1928–2001), American baseball player

Frank Lary (1930-2017), American baseball player

Lyn Lary (1906–1973), American baseball player

Yale Lary (1930-2017), American football player, businessman, and politicianAs a given or nickname:

Lary (singer), German singer and model

Lary Sorensen (1955- ), American baseball playerIn other uses:

Los Angeles RailwayProst=Lary

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a shortstop leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball or softball fielding position between second and third base, which is considered to be among the most demanding defensive positions. The position is mostly filled by defensive specialists, so shortstops are generally relatively poor batters who bat later in the batting order, with some exceptions. In the numbering system used by scorers to record defensive plays, the shortstop is assigned the number 6.

Rabbit Maranville is the all-time leader in career putouts as a shortstop with 5,139. Maranville is the only shortstop to record more than 5,000 career putouts.

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