Luke Butkus

Lucas J. Butkus (born June 26, 1979) is an American football coach and former center. He serves as assistant offensive line coach for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL).

Luke Butkus
Green Bay Packers
Position:Assistant offensive line coach
Personal information
Born:June 26, 1979 (age 39)
Steger, Illinois
Career information
High school:Bloom Trail
(Chicago Heights, Illinois)
College:Illinois
Undrafted:2002
Career history
As player:
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
As coach:

Playing career

He attended training camp with the Bears in 2002 and the San Diego Chargers in 2003. Butkus also played center for the Rhein Fire (2003) and Cologne Centurions (2004) of NFL Europe. He attended Bloom Trail High School in Chicago Heights, Illinois and the University of Illinois.

Coaching career

Prior to joining the Bears, he spent the two years as a graduate assistant coach at the University of Oregon (2005–06). While the announcement that the tenure of Quality Control coaches Butkus and Charles London would end came on the same day as the public learned that several Bears' offensive coaches would be fired, leading to speculation that London and Butkus were fired for performance issues, the team would later clarify that the Quality Control coaches were signed to contracts set to expire after the 2009/10 season, regardless of the team's final standing.[1]

Butkus joined the Seattle Seahawks on February 1, 2010 as an assistant offensive line coach.[2] Butkus left the Seahawk organization on January 3, 2011 and spent three seasons with the NFL's Jacksonville Jaguars. He was offered a position with his alma mater, the University of Illinois, by new Illini head coach Tim Beckman. Butkus continued in 2016 as offensive line coach to new head coach Lovie Smith.[3][4]

On February 7, 2019, the Green Bay Packers named Butkus to Matt LaFleur's coaching staff as assistant offensive line coach.[5]

Personal life

Butkus is the nephew of Pro Football Hall of Fame linebacker Dick Butkus.[6]

References

  1. ^ http://www.chicagobears.com/news/ChalkTalkStory.asp?story_id=6476
  2. ^ "Former Bears assistants land NFL jobs".
  3. ^ "Illinois hires John Tenuta to lead defense". ESPN. January 3, 2016. Luke Butkus returns to his alma mater for his second stint as offensive line coach at the University of Illinois in 2016.
  4. ^ Evans, Thayer (March 8, 2016). "Jaguars' Luke Butkus will be new offensive line coach at Illinois". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved June 23, 2017.
  5. ^ "Packers name Luke Butkus assistant offensive line coach". www.packers.com. February 7, 2019. Retrieved February 19, 2019.
  6. ^ Reinmuth, Gary (November 2, 2001). "Doing uncle proud". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved June 23, 2017.

External links

2001 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 2001 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big Ten Conference players for the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. The conference recognizes two official All-Big Ten selectors: (1) the Big Ten conference coaches selected separate offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Coaches" team); and (2) a panel of sports writers and broadcasters covering the Big Ten also selected offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Media" team).

2001 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 2001 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. They participated as members of the Big Ten Conference. Their home games were played at Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois. Led by senior quarterback Kurt Kittner, the team won the Big Ten Conference title and earned a Sugar Bowl berth, but lost to LSU, 47–34.

2002 San Diego Chargers season

The 2002 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 33rd season in the National Football League (NFL), its 43rd overall and the first under head coach Marty Schottenheimer. Their stadium, Qualcomm Stadium, hosted Super Bowl XXXVII at the end of the season, but the Chargers' failure to secure a playoff berth marked the 18th straight time that the Super Bowl did not include the team in whose region the game was being played. Their division was reduced to four teams at the start of the season with the Seattle Seahawks moving to the NFC. Despite starting the season at 4–0 and ending 6–2 halfway through, the Chargers only went 2–6 in their last 8 games.

2003 Rhein Fire season

The 2003 Rhein Fire season was the ninth season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Pete Kuharchek in his third year, and played its home games at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. They finished the regular season in second place with a record of six wins and four losses. In World Bowl XI, Rhein lost to the Frankfurt Galaxy 35–16.

2011 Seattle Seahawks season

The 2011 Seattle Seahawks season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League, the 10th playing their home games at CenturyLink Field (formerly known as Qwest Field) and the second under head coach Pete Carroll. It was the first season in over a decade in which the Seahawks came into the season with a new starting quarterback, as incumbent Matt Hasselbeck left for the Tennessee Titans in free agency. The Seahawks equaled their 7–9 record in 2010, but failed to defend their NFC West division title and missed the playoffs. This year was notable for the emergence of the Legion of Boom defensive group.

2012 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 2012 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. They were led by first-year head coach Tim Beckman, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium. They were a member of the Leaders Division of the Big Ten Conference. Illinois finished the 2012 season with 2–10, 0–8 in Big 10 Leaders play, where they placed last and failed to play bowl eligible for first time since 2009.

2013 Jacksonville Jaguars season

The 2013 Jacksonville Jaguars season was the franchise's 19th season in the National Football League, the first under general manager David Caldwell, and the first under head coach Gus Bradley. Although they missed the playoffs and started 0-8, the Jaguars improved upon their franchise-worst 2–14 record from 2012; but failed to improve their 1-7 home record from last year. Much like 2012, the root of their victories were intra-division. The Jaguars also gained a close non-divisional victory over the Browns to finish 4-12.

2014 Jacksonville Jaguars season

The 2014 Jacksonville Jaguars season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League and the second under head coach Gus Bradley. They failed to improve upon their 4–12 record from 2013 and finished 3–13, and finished third in the AFC South for the second straight year. The Jaguars were eliminated from postseason contention after their week 12 loss to the Colts.In week 13, the Jaguars had their biggest comeback in franchise history, defeating the New York Giants 25–24. The Jaguars trailed 21–0 in the first half, but outscored the Giants 25–3 in the second half, with the help of two defensive touchdowns. The Jaguars did not win a single road game during the season, the second time such a thing happened in franchise history.

2016 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 2016 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in the 2016 NCAA Division I FBS football season. They were led by first-year head coach Lovie Smith and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois. They were members of the West Division of the Big Ten Conference. They finished the season 3–9, 2–7 in Big Ten play to finish in sixth place in the West Division.

2017 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 2017 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign during the 2017 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Fighting Illini played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois, and competed in the West Division of the Big Ten Conference. They were led by second-year head coach Lovie Smith. They finished the season 2–10, 0–9 in Big Ten play to finish in last place in the West Division.

2018 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 2018 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Fighting Illini played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois, and competed in the West Division of the Big Ten Conference. They were led by third-year head coach Lovie Smith. They finished the season 4–8, 2–7 in Big Ten play finish in last place in the West Division.

2019 Green Bay Packers season

The 2019 season will be the Green Bay Packers' upcoming 99th season in the National Football League, their 101st overall and their first under new head coach Matt LaFleur. After suffering back-to-back losing seasons in for the first time since 1990–91 and missing the playoffs back-to-back seasons for the first time since 2005–06, the Packers will look to improve on their 6–9–1 record from last year, and attempt to return to the playoffs for the first time since 2016.

Bloom High School

Bloom High School is a public school in Chicago Heights, Illinois. It is part of Bloom Township High School District 206.

The school was founded in 1900. A second Chicago Heights high school, Bloom Trail, was established in 1976 to offset overcrowding. Since 1995, however, Bloom and Bloom Trail have shared the same sports programs, drawing from over 3,000 students in grades 9 to 12.

The present Bloom High School building, erected during the Great Depression, was named to the National Register of Historic Places on June 3, 1982. It is an Art Deco structure with six WPA murals.

The frescoes were created by Edgar Britton in 1935. The two limestone sculptures were designed by Curtis Drewes. The main structure of the high school was designed by the architectural firm of Royer, Danley, and Smith of Urbana, Illinois. Major additions were finished in 1956 and 1976.

In celebration of the 2018 Illinois Bicentennial, Bloom High School was selected as one of the Illinois 200 Great Places by the American Institute of Architects Illinois component (AIA Illinois).

Butkus

Butkus is the masculine form of a Lithuanian family name. Its feminine forms are: Butkienė or Butkuvienė (married woman or widow) and Butkutė (unmarried woman).

The surname may refer to:

Carl Butkus (1922–1978), a Lithuanian-American football player

Dick Butkus (born 1942), a Lithuanian-American football player

Luke Butkus (born 1979), a Lithuanian-American football player

Vytautas Butkus (born 1949), a Lithuanian rower

Zenonas Butkus (born 1951), a Lithuanian historian

Chicago Heights, Illinois

Chicago Heights is a city in Cook County, Illinois, United States. The population was 30,276 at the 2010 census. In earlier years, Chicago Heights was nicknamed "The Crossroads of the Nation". Currently, it is nicknamed "The Heights".

Dick Butkus

Richard Marvin Butkus (born December 9, 1942) is a former American football player, sports commentator, and actor. He played professional football as a linebacker for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL) from 1965 to 1973. Through those nine seasons he was invited to eight Pro Bowls, named a first-team All-Pro six times, and was twice recognized by his peers as the NFL's Defensive Player of the Year. Renowned as a fierce tackler and for the relentless effort with which he played, Butkus is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most intimidating linebackers in pro football history.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Butkus played his entire football career in his home state, which began at Chicago Vocational High School. As a college football player at the University of Illinois, he was a linebacker and center for the Fighting Illini. A two-time consensus All-American, he led the Illini to a Rose Bowl victory in 1963 and was deemed the most valuable player in the Big Ten Conference, and in 1964 he was named college football's Lineman of the Year by United Press International (UPI). He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983.

Butkus was drafted by the Bears as the third overall pick in the 1965 NFL Draft. He soon established himself as a ball hawk with his penchant for forcing turnovers. In his NFL career, he intercepted 22 passes, recovered 27 fumbles (a record when he retired), and was responsible for causing many more fumbles with his jarring tackles. His tackling ability earned him both admiration and trepidation from opposing players. According to Hall of Fame defensive end Deacon Jones, Butkus "was a well-conditioned animal, and every time he hit you, he tried to put you in the cemetery, not the hospital." In 2009, the NFL Network named Butkus the most feared tackler of all time.

Butkus is credited with having defined the middle linebacker position, and is still viewed as the "gold standard by which other middle linebackers are measured." He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1979, and his No. 51 jersey is retired by the Bears. Following his playing career, Butkus began careers in acting, sports commentary, and celebrity endorsement. He is active in philanthropy through the Butkus Foundation, which manages various charitable causes.

Harry Hiestand

Harry Hiestand (born November 19, 1958) is the offensive line coach for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. Hiestand earned his bachelor's degree in health and physical education from East Stroudsburg University in 1983. He and his wife, Terri, have three sons, Michael, Matthew and Mark, and one daughter, Sarah.He previously coached the at University of Tennessee and University of Notre Dame. Hiestand has also coached at East Stroudsburg University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Southern California, University of Toledo, University of Cincinnati, University of Missouri and University of Illinois.

List of family relations in American football

The following is a list of family relations in American football.

Adamle – Tony Adamle (father), Mike Adamle (son)

Adams – Julius Adams (father), Keith Adams (son)

Adams – Sam Adams Sr. (father), Sam Adams Jr. (son)

Agnew – Ray Agnew Jr. (father), Ray Agnew III (son)

Aldridge – Allen Aldridge Sr. (father), Allen Aldridge Jr. (son)

Anderson – Flipper Anderson (father), Dres Anderson (son)

Atkinson – George Atkinson Jr. (father), George Atkinson III (son)

Ayodele – Akin Ayodele, Remi Ayodele (brothers)

Ayanbadejo – Obafemi Ayanbadejo, Brendon Ayanbadejo (brothers)

Bahr – Chris Bahr, Matt Bahr (brothers)

Bailey – Champ Bailey, Boss Bailey (brothers)

Bakhtiari – Eric Bakhtiari, David Bakhtiari (brothers)

Barber – Ronde Barber, Tiki Barber (twin brothers)

Barber – Marion Barber Jr. (father); Marion Barber III, Dominique Barber (sons)

Belichick – Steve Belichick (father); Bill Belichick (son); Stephen Belichick (grandson)

Bennett – Michael Bennett, Martellus Bennett (brothers)

Berry – Eric Berry, Evan Berry (brothers)

Blackwood – Lyle Blackwood, Glenn Blackwood (brothers)

Blades – Bennie Blades, Brian Blades (brothers), H.B. Blades (son of Bennie)

Bolden/Pitts – Brandon Bolden and Frank Pitts (grandson and grandfather)

Bosa/Kumerow – John Bosa (father), Eric Kumerow (brother-in-law), Joey Bosa (son of John, nephew of Eric)

Bowden – Bobby Bowden (father); Tommy Bowden, Jeff Bowden, Terry Bowden (sons).

Bradshaw – Terry Bradshaw, Craig Bradshaw (brothers)

Brown – Orlando Brown (father), Orlando Brown Jr. (son)

Brown/Thompkins – Eddie Brown (father), Antonio Brown (son), Kenbrell Thompkins (cousin of Antonio)

Butkus – Dick Butkus (uncle), Luke Butkus (nephew)

Byrd – Gill Byrd (father), Jairus Byrd (son)

Caldwell – Andre Caldwell, Reche Caldwell (brothers)

Carpenter – Rob Carpenter (father), Bobby Carpenter (son)

Carr – David Carr, Derek Carr (brothers)

Carter – Cris Carter (father), Duron Carter (son)

Cash – Keith Cash, Kerry Cash (brothers)

Castille – Jeremiah Castille (father), Tim Castille (son)

Celek – Brent Celek, Garrett Celek (brothers)

Chickillo – Nick Chickillo (father), Tony Chickillo (son), Anthony Chickillo (grandson)

Chubb – Bradley Chubb, Brandon Chubb (brothers); Nick Chubb (cousin)

Clausen – Casey Clausen, Jimmy Clausen, Rick Clausen (brothers)

Cline – Tony Cline (father); Tony Cline Jr. (son)

Coffman – Paul Coffman (father), Chase Coffman (son)

Colquitt – Craig Colquitt, Jimmy Colquitt (cousins); Britton Colquitt, Dustin Colquitt (sons of Craig, nephews of Jimmy)

Cox – Bryan Cox (father), Bryan Cox Jr. (son)

Cromartie/Rodgers-Cromartie/Cromartie-Smith – Antonio Cromartie, Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, Da'Mon Cromartie-Smith, Marcus Cromartie (cousins)

Crumpler – Alge Crumpler, Carlester Crumpler (brothers)

Cunningham – Sam Cunningham, Randall Cunningham (brothers)

Davis – Vernon Davis, Vontae Davis (brothers)

Dawkins – Brian Dawkins (uncle), Dalyn Dawkins (nephew)

DeOssie – Steve DeOssie (father), Zak DeOssie (son)

Derby – Glenn Derby (uncle), A. J. Derby (nephew)

Detmer – Ty Detmer, Koy Detmer (brothers)

Dimitroff – Tom Dimitroff (father), Thomas Dimitroff (son)

Dixon – Brian Dixon, Brandon Dixon (twin brothers)

Donelli – Aldo Donelli; Allen Donelli (brothers)

Dorsett – Tony Dorsett (father), Anthony Dorsett (son)

Edwards – Mario Edwards (father), Mario Edwards Jr. (son)

Ellington – Andre Ellington, Bruce Ellington (cousins)

Ellison – Riki Ellison (father), Rhett Ellison (son)

Elway – Jack Elway (father), John Elway (son)

Fahnhorst – Keith Fahnhorst, Jim Fahnhorst (brothers)

Farmer – George Farmer (father), Danny Farmer (son)

Farr – Mel Farr (father); Mel Farr Jr., Mike Farr (sons)

Fassel – Jim Fassel (father), John Fassel (son)

Fells – Daniel Fells, Darren Fells (brothers)

Flacco – Joe Flacco, Mike Flacco (brothers)

Fletcher – Bryan Fletcher, Terrell Fletcher (brothers)

Fuller – Vincent Fuller, Corey Fuller, Kyle Fuller, Kendall Fuller (brothers)

Gbaja-Biamila – Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila, Akbar Gbaja-Biamila (brothers)

Gaffney – Derrick Gaffney (father), Jabar Gaffney (son)

Geathers – Robert Geathers Sr., Jumpy Geathers (brothers); Robert Geathers Jr., Clifton Geathers, Kwame Geathers (sons of Robert Sr.), Clayton Geathers, Jeremy Geathers (cousins)

Gerhart – Toby Gerhart, Garth Gerhart (brothers)

Gogolak – Pete Gogolak, Charlie Gogolak (brothers)

Golic – Bob Golic, Mike Golic (brothers), Mike Golic Jr. (nephew of Bob, son of Mike)

Gramatica – Martín Gramática, Bill Gramatica (brothers)

Grange – Garland Grange, Red Grange (brothers)

Green – A. J. Green, T. J. Green (cousins)

Griese – Bob Griese (father); Brian Griese (son)

Griffin – Shaquem Griffin, Shaquill Griffin (twin brothers)

Gronkowski – Rob Gronkowski, Dan Gronkowski, Chris Gronkowski, Glenn Gronkowski (brothers)

Gruden – Jon Gruden, Jay Gruden (brothers)

Hager – Britt Hager (father), Bryce Hager (son)

Hakim – Az-Zahir Hakim, Saalim Hakim (brothers)

Hambrick – Darren Hambrick, Troy Hambrick (brothers)

Hannah – Herb Hannah (father); John Hannah, Charley Hannah (sons)

Harbaugh – Jack Harbaugh (father); John Harbaugh, Jim Harbaugh (sons)

Hasselbeck – Don Hasselbeck (father); Matt Hasselbeck, Tim Hasselbeck (sons)

Heyward – Craig Heyward (father); Cameron Heyward (son)

Highsmith – Alonzo Highsmith (father), Alonzo Highsmith Jr. (son)

Hilgenberg – Jerry Hilgenberg (father); Wally Hilgenberg (brother); Jay Hilgenberg, Joel Hilgenberg (sons of Jerry)

Hochuli – Shawn Hochuli (father); Ed Hochuli (son) (family of referees)

Holt – Terrence Holt, Torry Holt (brothers)

Huard – Damon Huard, Brock Huard (brothers)

Ihenacho – Carl Ihenacho, Duke Ihenacho (brothers)

Ingram – Mark Ingram Sr. (father), Mark Ingram Jr. (son)

Ismail – Raghib Ismail, Qadry Ismail (brothers)

Jenkins – Kris Jenkins, Cullen Jenkins (brothers)

Jerry – John Jerry, Peria Jerry (brothers)

Johnson/Thomas - Keyshawn Johnson (uncle), Michael Thomas (nephew)

Jones – Jerry Jones (father), Jerry Jones Jr., Stephen Jones (sons)

Jones – Julius Jones, Thomas Jones (brothers)

Jones-Drew/Ward – Maurice Jones-Drew, T. J. Ward (cousins)

Jordan – Steve Jordan (father), Cameron Jordan (son)

Kalil – Ryan Kalil, Matt Kalil (brothers)

Kearse/Buchanon – Jevon Kearse (uncle), Jayron Kearse (nephew), Phillip Buchanon (cousin of Jayron)

Kelce – Jason Kelce, Travis Kelce (brothers)

Kendricks – Mychal Kendricks, Eric Kendricks (brothers)

Kupp – Jake Kupp (father), Craig Kupp (son), Cooper Kupp (grandson)

Landry – Dawan Landry, LaRon Landry (brothers)

Leggett – Earl Leggett (father), Brad Leggett (son)

Little – Larry Little, David Little (brothers)

Long – Howie Long (father); Chris Long, Kyle Long (sons)

Lott/Nece – Ronnie Lott (father), Ryan Nece (son)

Luck – Oliver Luck (father), Andrew Luck (son)

Lusk – Herbert H. Lusk, Hendrick Hamilton Lusk, Harold Hollingsworth Lusk, (brothers)

Lynch/Johnson/Russell – Marshawn Lynch; Josh Johnson, JaMarcus Russell (cousins)

Manning – Archie Manning (father); Peyton Manning, Eli Manning (sons)

Marion – Jerry Marion (father), Brock Marion (son)

Martin – Nick Martin, Zack Martin (brothers)

Mays – Stafford Mays (father), Taylor Mays (son)

Matthews/Niklas – Clay Matthews, Sr. (father); Clay Matthews, Jr., Bruce Matthews (sons), Clay Matthews III, Kevin Matthews, Casey Matthews, Jake Matthews, Mike Matthews (grandsons), Troy Niklas (Bruce Matthews' nephew)

McCaffrey – Ed McCaffrey (father); Max McCaffrey and Christian McCaffrey (sons)

McAlister – James McAlister (father), Chris McAlister (son)

McClendon – Willie McClendon (father), Bryan McClendon (son)

McCourty – Devin McCourty, Jason McCourty (twin brothers)

McCown – Josh McCown, Luke McCown (brothers)

McCutcheon – Lawrence McCutcheon (father), Daylon McCutcheon (son)

McDonald – Tim McDonald (father); T. J. McDonald, Tevin McDonald (sons)

McDougle – Jerome McDougle, Stockar McDougle (brothers)• McFadden-Darren McFadden-Reggie Swinton (Cousins)

McKay – John McKay (father), John McKay Jr., Rich McKay (sons)

McKenzie – Raleigh McKenzie, Reggie McKenzie (twin brothers)

McKinney – Steve McKinney, Seth McKinney (brothers)

McMillan – Ernie McMillan (father), Erik McMillan (son)

McTyer – Tim McTyer (father), Torry McTyer (son)

Metcalf – Terry Metcalf (father), Eric Metcalf (son)

Mike-Mayer – Nick Mike-Mayer, Steve Mike-Mayer (brothers)

Montgomery– Wilbert Montgomery, Cle Montgomery, Tyrone Montgomery, Fred Montgomery (brothers)

Moorehead – Emery Moorehead (father), Aaron Moorehead (son)

Mora – Jim E. Mora (father), Jim L. Mora (son)

Moss – Eric Moss, Randy Moss (brothers)

Moss – Santana Moss, Sinorice Moss (brothers)

Nolan – Dick Nolan (father), Mike Nolan (son)

Nassib – Carl Nassib, Ryan Nassib (brothers)

Nesser/Schneider/Hopkins - Al Nesser, Frank Nesser, Fred Nesser, John Nesser, Phil Nesser, Ted Nesser (brothers), [[John Schneider]] (brother-in-law), Charlie Nesser (Ted Nesser's son), [[Ted Hopkins]] (Charlie Nesser's cousin)

Newton – Cam Newton, Cecil Newton (brothers)

Ogden – Jonathan Ogden, Marques Ogden (brothers)

Olsen – Merlin Olsen, Orrin Olsen, Phil Olsen (brothers)

Pagano – Chuck Pagano, John Pagano (brothers)

Palmer – Carson Palmer, Jordan Palmer (brothers)

Payton – Eddie Payton, Walter Payton (brothers); Jarrett Payton (son of Walter)

Peko – Domata Peko, Tupe Peko (brothers), Kyle Peko (cousin)

Perkins – Don Perkins (great-uncle), Paul Perkins (great-nephew)

Perriman – Brett Perriman (father), Breshad Perriman (son)

Perry – Michael Dean Perry, William Perry (brothers)

Petrino – Bobby Petrino, Paul Petrino (brothers)

Phillips – Bum Phillips (father), Wade Phillips (son), Wes Phillips (grandson)

Pouncey – Maurkice Pouncey, Mike Pouncey (twin brothers)

Pyne – George Pyne II (father), George Pyne III (son), Jim Pyne (grandson)

Randle – Ervin Randle, John Randle (brothers)

Reed – Brooks Reed, Lucas Reed (brothers)

Reid – Eric Reid, Justin Reid (brothers)

Rice/Matthews – Jerry Rice (father), Jerry Rice Jr. (son); Jordan Matthews (cousin of the Rices)

Robiskie – Terry Robiskie (father), Andrew Robiskie, Brian Robiskie (sons)

Rodgers – Aaron Rodgers, Jordan Rodgers (brothers)

Ryan – Buddy Ryan (father); Rex Ryan, Rob Ryan (twin sons)

Salaam – Sulton Salaam (father); Rashaan Salaam (son)

Sanders – Barry Sanders (father), Barry J. Sanders (son)

Sauer – George Sauer (father); George Sauer Jr. (son)

Saul – Bill Saul, Rich Saul and Ron Saul (twin brothers)

Schwartz – Geoff Schwartz; Mitchell Schwartz (brothers)

Selmon – Dewey Selmon, Lee Roy Selmon (brothers)

Shanahan – Mike Shanahan (father), Kyle Shanahan (son)

Sharpe – Sterling Sharpe, Shannon Sharpe (brothers)

Sharper – Jamie Sharper, Darren Sharper (brothers).

Shepard – Darrell Shepard and Derrick Shepard (brothers); Sterling Shepard (son of Derrick)

Shula – Don Shula (father); Dave Shula, Mike Shula (sons).

Shuler – Mickey Shuler (father); Mickey Shuler, Jr. (son)

Simms – Phil Simms (father); Chris Simms, Matt Simms (sons)

Slater – Jackie Slater (father); Matthew Slater (son).

Smith – Rod Smith, Jaylon Smith (brothers)

Smith – Malcolm Smith, Steve Smith (brothers)

Spikes – Brandon Spikes, Takeo Spikes (cousins)

Stoops – Bob Stoops, Mike Stoops, Mark Stoops (brothers)

Sudfeld – Nate Sudfeld, Zach Sudfeld (brothers)

Suhey – Steve Suhey (father), Matt Suhey (son)

Talbert – Don Talbert, Diron Talbert (brothers)

Tatupu – Mosi Tatupu (father), Lofa Tatupu (son)

Taylor – Fred Taylor (father), Kelvin Taylor (son)

Trufant – Desmond Trufant, Isaiah Trufant, Marcus Trufant (brothers)

Tuiasosopo – Manu Tuiasosopo (father), Marques Tuiasosopo (son)

Turk – Matt Turk, Dan Turk (brothers)

Upshaw – Gene Upshaw, Marvin Upshaw (brothers)

Urlacher – Brian Urlacher, Casey Urlacher (brothers)

Van Buren – Steve Van Buren, Ebert Van Buren (brothers)

Vereen – Shane Vereen, Brock Vereen (brothers)

Vick/Brooks – Michael Vick, Marcus Vick (brothers); Aaron Brooks (cousin to the Vicks)

Ward – Terron Ward, T. J. Ward (brothers)

Washington – Ted Washington Sr. (father), Ted Washington Jr. (son)

Watkins – Jaylen Watkins, Sammy Watkins (brothers)

Watt – J. J. Watt, Derek Watt, T. J. Watt (brothers)

Westbrook – Brian Westbrook, Byron Westbrook (brothers)

Whitehurst – David Whitehurst (father), Charlie Whitehurst (son)

Wilson – George Wilson (father), George Wilson Jr. (son)

Winslow – Kellen Winslow (father); Kellen Winslow II (son)

Wisniewski – Leo Wisniewski, Steve Wisniewski (brothers), Stefen Wisniewski (son of Leo, nephew of Steve)

Young – Willie Young (father); Rodney Young (son)

Zendejas - Luis Zendejas, Max Zendejas, Joaquin Zendejas (brothers), and Tony Zendejas (cousin)

Steger, Illinois

Steger is a village that straddles the border which separates Cook County and Will County, Illinois (Steger Road is the border line). It is 35 miles (56 km) south of Chicago and had a population at the 2010 census of 9,570.

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