Lud Wray

James R. Ludlow "Lud" Wray (February 7, 1894 – July 24, 1967) was a professional American football player, coach, and co-founder, with college teammate Bert Bell, of the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. He was the first coach of the Boston Braves (now Washington Redskins) and of the Eagles.[1] He also served as head coach at his alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania.

Lud Wray
Posed photograph of Wray seated and wearing a football uniform bearing a "F" on the chest with pads but no helmet
Wray as a member of the Frankford Athletic Association Yellow Jackets in 1922.
Position:Center
Personal information
Born:February 7, 1894
Philadelphia
Died:July 24, 1967 (aged 73)
Philadelphia
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High school:Chestnut Hill (PA)
College:Penn
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Head coaching record
Regular season:13–25–3 (.354) (NFL)
5–4 (.556) (College)
Player stats at PFR
Coaching stats at PFR

Playing career

Lud Wray 1921
Wray as a member of the Buffalo All-Americans in 1921.

Wray attended Chestnut Hill Academy in Philadelphia, where he lettered in baseball and football.[2] He played his college football at the University of Pennsylvania, was the Quakers' center from 1914 to 1916. During World War I, Wray served in the United States Marine Corps. He returned for his senior season in 1919.[3] In additional to football, Wray also played catcher on the Penn baseball team.[2]

Professionally, Wray played for the Buffalo Niagaras, Buffalo Prospects, and Buffalo All-Americans[4] from 1918 until 1921. In 1920 and 1921, Buffalo was a member of the National Football League (then called the American Professional Football Association).[5]

Coaching career

Penn

From 1923 to 1929, Wray served as an assistant football coach at Penn. In 1930 he succeeded Lou Young as head coach.[2] He was fired on December 12, 1930 due to friction with players, alumni, and the public.[6]

Boston Braves

In 1932, Wray was named head coach of the Boston Braves, a National Football League expansion team.[7] The Braves went 4–4–2 in their inaugural season. He left the team after one season and was replaced by Lone Star Dietz.[8]

Philadelphia Eagles

In 1933, Wray's former teammate and fellow assistant at Penn, Bert Bell convinced him to become coach of the expansion Philadelphia Eagles. By 1936, the club was suffering significant financial losses and was offered for sale at a public auction. Bell was the only bidder and became the team's sole owner. On April 28, Wray refused a 66% reduction in salary and left the team.[9]

Later career

In 1938, Wray became an assistant at Manhattan College.[10] He remained with the school until his resignation in November 1940.[11] In 1941, Wray served as an assistant to Anthony H. Scanlan at Saint Joseph's University.[12] When Scanlan became head coach at Holy Cross, Wray followed him. In 1943, Scanlan's war commitments limited him to only being able to coach on game day and Wray led the team the rest of the week. Wray and Scanlan had a falling out and Wray was replaced by Ox DaGrosa for 1944.[13]

Personal life and death

On December 26, 1933 Wray married Juanita Sauveur.[14] He died on July 25, 1967 in Philadelphia. At the team of his death, Wray resided in Oreland, Pennsylvania. He was survived by his wife.[3]

References

  1. ^ Dupont, Kevin Paul (29 December 2013). "Redskins name debate traces to Boston". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 14 January 2014.
  2. ^ a b c "Wray Named Coach of Eleven at Penn". The New York Times. December 21, 1929.
  3. ^ a b "Lud Wray, Ex-Owners of Football Eagles". The New York Times. July 26, 1967.
  4. ^ "Lud Wray". NFL. NFL. Retrieved 14 January 2014.
  5. ^ Miller, Jeffery (2002). Buffalo's Forgotten Champions.
  6. ^ "Wray is released as Coach by Penn". The New York Times. December 13, 1930.
  7. ^ "Pro Football Plans for Boston Outlined". The Boston Daily Globe. April 21, 1932.
  8. ^ "Sportsman" (March 8, 1933). "Live Tips and Topics". The Boston Daily Globe.
  9. ^ Lyons, Robert S. (2010). On Any Given Sunday: A Life of Bert Bell. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
  10. ^ "Kopf Names Wray Manhattan Aide". The New York Times. February 15, 1938.
  11. ^ "Tessier to Coach Line". The New York Times. March 6, 1941.
  12. ^ Fitzgerald, Tom (December 9, 1941). "Unknown Named Crusder Coach". The Boston Daily Globe.
  13. ^ "Ank Scanlan Resigns". The Boston Daily Globe. December 19, 1944.
  14. ^ "J.R.L. Wray Weds Miss Sauveur". The New York Times. December 27, 1933.
1917 All-Service football team

The 1917 All-Service football team consists of American football players selected to the all-service football teams chosen by various selectors.

1917 League Island Marines football team

The 1917 League Island Marines football team, sometimes referred to as "Mahan's Marines", represented the United States Marine Corps stationed at the League Island Navy Yard in Philadelphia during the 1917 college football season. Former Harvard star Eddie Mahan, a three-time All-American from 1913 to 1915, led the team.

Four League Island players were named to the 1917 All-Service football team: fullback Eddie Mahan (Paul Purman, first team); halfback Johnny Scott (New York Times, 1st team); tackle Corbeau (NYT, first team); and center Lud Wray (NYT, first team).

1917 Penn Quakers football team

The 1917 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1917 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 9–2 record in their second year under head coach Bob Folwell. Significant games included victories over Michigan (16–0), Carlisle (26–0), and Cornell (37–0), and losses to undefeated national champion Georgia Tech (0–41) and Pittsburgh (6–14). The 1917 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 245 to 71.Five Penn players received honors on the 1917 College Football All-America Team. They are: end Heinie Miller (Jack Veiock and Dick Jemison 1st teams, Walter Eckersall, 2nd team); Joseph Strauss (Jemison 1st team); guard Herbert Dieter (Paul Purman 2nd team); center Lud Wray (New York Times All-Service team, Purman 2nd team); and fullback Joseph Howard Berry, Jr. (Eckersall and Purman 1st teams, Veiock 2nd team).

1930 Penn Quakers football team

The 1930 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1930 college football season. The Quakers were led by head coach Lud Wray and played their home games at Franklin Field with a capacity crowd of 78,000.

1933 NFL season

The 1933 NFL season was the 14th regular season of the National Football League. Because of the success of the 1932 NFL Playoff Game, the league divided its teams into two divisions for the first time, with the winners of each division playing in a championship game to determine the NFL champion. Three new teams also joined the league: the Pittsburgh Pirates, the Philadelphia Eagles, and the Cincinnati Reds. Also, the Boston Braves changed their name to the Boston Redskins and the Staten Island Stapletons, while still scheduling games against league teams, left the league.

The season ended when the Chicago Bears defeated the New York Giants in the first ever NFL Championship Game.

1933 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1933 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's inaugural season in the National Football League (NFL). The team went 3–5–1, failing to qualify for the playoffs under head coach Lud Wray.

1934 NFL season

The 1934 NFL season was the 15th regular season of the National Football League. Before the season, the Portsmouth Spartans moved from Ohio to Detroit, Michigan, and were renamed the Detroit Lions.

The Cincinnati Reds lost their first eight games, then were suspended for not paying league dues. The St. Louis Gunners, an independent team, played the last 3 games of the season for the Reds.

The Ed Thorp Memorial Trophy was established as the league's award for the NFL champion, and was awarded through 1969. The host team for the NFL Championship Game would now alternate between the two divisions, with the Eastern Division champion hosting in even-numbered years, and the Western champion hosting in odd-numbered years.The season ended with the NFL Championship Game when the New York Giants defeated the Chicago Bears at the Polo Grounds in what has become known as the "Sneakers Game".

1935 NFL season

The 1935 NFL season was the 16th regular season of the National Football League. The season ended when the Detroit Lions defeated the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game.

Were it not for a cancellation due to heavy snow, this would have been the first season where all NFL teams played the same number of games. This standardization was formalized the following year and has continued ever since, with the number of games being slowly increased to sixteen by 1978.

Bill McPeak

William Patrick McPeak (July 24, 1926 – May 7, 1991) was an American football player and National Football League coach.

Ed Zubrow

Ed Zubrow (born c. 1952) is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1986 to 1988, compiling a record of 23–7. After leading the Penn Quakers to two Ivy League titles, in 1986 and 1988, Zubrow resigned from his post at Penn in March 1989 to take a job with the School District of Philadelphia to combat drug abuse and dropout rates.

Frank Dole

Frank Fessenden Dole (December 25, 1859 – May 22, 1939) was an American football coach, dog breeder, and journalist. He was the first head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania, serving from 1885 to 1887, and leading the Penn Quakers to a record of 23–20–1 in three seasons.

Dole was born on December 25, 1859 in Portland, Maine. As a dog breeder, he specialized in Bull Terriers. Dole joined the New York Herald Tribune in 1912 as a writer, and remained on the newspaper's staff until 1938, when he retired as kennel editor. He died on May 22, 1939 at his home in Metuchen, New Jersey.

Gary Steele (American football)

Gary R. Steele (born c. 1947) is a former American football player and coach. In 1966, he became the first African American athlete to earn a football letter at the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. He was selected by the Detroit Lions in the 1969 NFL Draft. Steele served as the head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1989 to 1991, compiling a record of 9–21.

Joe Kuharich

Joseph Lawrence Kuharich (April 14, 1917 – January 25, 1981) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of San Francisco from 1948 to 1951 and at the University of Notre Dame from 1959 to 1962, compiling a career college football record of 42–37. Kuharich was also the head coach of the Chicago Cardinals in 1952, the Washington Redskins from 1954 to 1958, and the Philadelphia Eagles from 1964 to 1968, amassing a career coaching record of 58–81–3 in the National Football League (NFL). He played football as a guard at Notre Dame from 1935 to 1937 and with the Chicago Cardinals in 1940, 1941 and 1945. Kuharich's death fell on the day the Eagles lost Super Bowl XV to the Oakland Raiders.

List of Buffalo All-Americans players

This is a list of known American football players who have played for the Buffalo All-Americans of the National Football League in 1920 - 1923. It includes players that have played at least one match with the team.

List of Philadelphia Eagles head coaches

This is a list of head coaches for the Philadelphia Eagles. The Philadelphia Eagles are a professional American football team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Eagles joined the National Football League (NFL) as an expansion team in 1933. Currently members of the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference (NFC), the team has won three NFL titles and made three Super Bowl appearances (1980, 2004, and 2018), with their first Super Bowl victory coming in Super Bowl LII under second-year head coach Doug Pederson. There have been 22 head coaches of the Eagles in the NFL.

Three different coaches have won NFL championships with the team: Earl "Greasy" Neale in 1948 and 1949, Buck Shaw in 1960, and Doug Pederson in Super Bowl LII. Andy Reid is the all-time leader in games coached and wins, while Neale has the highest winning percentage with .594 (with at least one full season coached). Bert Bell is statistically the worst coach the Eagles have had in terms of winning percentage, with .185 win/loss percentage.Of the 22 Eagles coaches, four have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Bert Bell was a charter member of the Hall of Fame. Bell was inducted for his work as the NFL Commissioner from 1946–1959. Wayne Millner, who coached the team in 1951, was enshrined as a player in 1968. Greasy Neale was in the class of 1969 for his work as the Eagles coach in the 1940s. Mike McCormack made the 1984 class for his Offensive Tackle play. Several former NFL players have been head coaches for the Eagles, including Jerry Williams, Ed Khayat, and Marion Campbell. Andy Reid. spent 14 seasons in charge before he was fired on December 31, 2012, after a 4–12 season – Reid's worst season in charge – which left the Eagles bottom of the NFC. He was replaced by former University of Oregon head coach Chip Kelly, who led the Eagles to a 10–6 record and the playoffs. Kelly was fired on December 29, 2015 after going 6–9 through that season's first 15 games. He was replaced by Offensive coordinator Pat Shurmer for week 17. As of January 14, the Eagles named Kansas City Chiefs offensive coordinator, Doug Pederson their new head coach going into the 2016 NFL season.

List of Washington Redskins head coaches

This is a complete list of Washington Redskins head coaches. There have been 28 head coaches for the Washington Redskins, including coaches for the Boston Redskins (1933–1936) and Boston Braves (1932), of the National Football League (NFL). The Redskins franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.Joe Gibbs is the only coach to have more than one tenure. Two different coaches have won NFL championships with the team: Ray Flaherty in 1937 and 1942, and Joe Gibbs in 1982, 1987 and 1991. Gibbs is the all-time leader in games coached and wins, and Dudley DeGroot leads all coaches in winning percentage with .737 (with at least one full season coached). Mike Nixon is statistically the worst coach the Redskins have had in terms of winning percentage, with .182.Of the 28 Redskins coaches, seven have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including Ray Flaherty, Turk Edwards, Curly Lambeau, Otto Graham, Vince Lombardi, George Allen and Joe Gibbs. Several former players have been head coach for the Redskins, including Turk Edwards, Dick Todd, Jack Pardee and Richie Petitbon.

In addition, former players have become assistant coaches, such as Earnest Byner, Russ Grimm, and Keenan McCardell. On January 5, 2010 the Redskins hired former Denver Broncos and Oakland Raiders coach Mike Shanahan. Shanahan went 24–40 during four seasons in charge, before he was fired on December 30, 2013.

Lou Young (American football coach)

Louis Alonzo Young (c. 1894 – July 19, 1948) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1923 to 1929, compiling a record of 49–15–2. Young played college football at Penn from 1912 to 1914, captaining the team in 1913. He died at the age of 56 on July 19, 1948 in Philadelphia.

Union Quakers of Philadelphia

The Union Quakers of Philadelphia were a professional independent football team, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1921. The team evolved from a number of pro players who played with the Union Club of Phoenixville during their 1920 season. During their only season of operation, the club won the "Philadelphia City Championship". All of the team's home games were played at the Baker Bowl.

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