Lucila Venegas

Lucila Venegas Montes (born 23 April 1981) is an international football referee from Mexico.[1][2]

Venegas became a FIFA listed referee in 2008.[3]

She is an official at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France.[4][5]

Lucila Venegas
Lucila Venegas (Women's World Cup 2019)
Full name Lucila Venegas Montes
Born 23 April 1981 (age 38)
Guadalajara, Mexico
International
Years League Role
2008-- FIFA listed Referee

References

  1. ^ http://www.ceroacero.es/arbitro.php?id=7081
  2. ^ https://us.soccerway.com/referees/lucila-venegas/119972/
  3. ^ FIFA.com. "Football Development - Refereeing - Mission and Goals". FIFA.com. Retrieved 4 July 2019.
  4. ^ https://de.fifa.com/womensworldcup/news/aufgebot-der-spieloffiziellen-fur-die-fifa-frauen-wm-2019tm
  5. ^ https://img.fifa.com/image/upload/n8eqnjfvnrfpvqt0msyx.pdf
2010 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship

The 2010 CONCACAF Under-17 Women's Championship was held in Costa Rica from March 10–20, 2010. This was the second edition of the U-17 women's championship for CONCACAF. The first and second placed teams qualified for the 2010 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup held in Trinidad and Tobago. The United States were the defending champions from 2008. Trinidad and Tobago did not participate because they automatically qualified to the World Cup as hosts.

2010 in American soccer

The 2010 Season was the 98th season of competitive soccer in the United States.

2012 Algarve Cup

The 2012 Algarve Cup was the nineteenth edition of the Algarve Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held annually in Portugal. It began on 29 February and ended on 7 March 2012.

2012 CONCACAF Women's Pre-Olympic Tournament qualification

There will be a qualification held to determine the three qualifiers from the Caribbean and two from Central America who will join Canada, Mexico and the United States at the final tournament.

2012 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The 2012 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was the 6th edition of the tournament. The tournament was played in Japan from 19 August to 8 September, with sixteen national football soccer teams and mark the first hosting of a FIFA women's football tournament in the country.The host nation were to be decided on 19 March 2010 but was postponed by FIFA to give bidders more time to prepare their bids.On 3 March 2011 FIFA initially awarded the World Cup to Uzbekistan. However, on 18 December 2011 FIFA had the tournament stripped from this country for problems with the bid and named Japan as a possible host. Japan was officially announced as host on 8 February 2012.

2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship

The 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship, the ninth edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship/Gold Cup/Women's World Cup qualifying tournament, was a women's football tournament that took place in the United States between 15 and 26 October 2014. It served as CONCACAF's qualifier to the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. The top three teams qualified directly. The fourth placed team advanced to a play-off against the third placed team of the 2014 Copa América Femenina.

The qualifying to the tournament was organized by the Central American Football Union (UNCAF) in Central America and the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) in the Caribbean and started on 19 May 2014.

The United States and Mexico received byes into the tournament. A total of 30 teams entered qualifying, with Martinique and Guadeloupe not eligible for World Cup qualification as they are only members of CONCACAF and not FIFA. Therefore, a total of 28 teams were in contention for the three direct places plus the play-off place against CONMEBOL's Ecuador. Canada did not participate as they already qualified to the World Cup as hosts.

The United States defeated Costa Rica 6–0 in the final to win their seventh title.

2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup

The 2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup was the fourth edition of the youth association football tournament for women under the age of 17. The final tournament was hosted in Costa Rica.

The competition was played from 15 March to 4 April 2014. Japan beat Spain in the final 2–0, the same score the same match ended in the group stage. Japan emerged as the fourth different champion in four editions.

The opening match of the tournament set a new tournament record with 34,453 spectators. In total 284,320 supporters attended matches averaging 8,885 per match beating the 2012 record.

2017 CONCACAF Awards

The shortlists for the 2017 CONCACAF Awards were announced on 22 November 2017. The results were announced on 18 and 19 December 2017.

2017–18 Liga MX Femenil season

The 2017–18 Liga MX Femenil season was the inaugural season of the top-flight women's football league in Mexico. The season is contested by sixteen teams, being the counterpart women's teams of the men's league, Liga MX. Of the 18 Liga MX clubs, Puebla and Lobos BUAP were the two teams who do not field a women's team.

2018 CONCACAF Awards

The shortlists for the 2018 CONCACAF Awards were announced on 11 December 2018.

The awards are for performances between 1 January and 10 December 2018. The results were announced on 15 January 2019.

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship was the 10th edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship (also known as the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying Tournament), the quadrennial international football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. Eight teams played in the tournament, which took place from 4–17 October in the United States.The tournament served as the CONCACAF qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. The top three teams qualified for the World Cup, while the fourth-placed team advanced to a play-off against the third-placed team from the South American confederation, CONMEBOL. It also determined the CONCACAF teams playing at the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima.The United States were the defending champions of the competition. They successfully defended their title as hosts, winning the final 2–0 against Canada for their 8th CONCACAF Women's Championship title.

2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup

The 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup was the 6th edition of the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-17 national teams of the member associations of FIFA, since its inception in 2008.

The tournament was held in Uruguay from 13 November to 1 December 2018. North Korea were the defending champions but were eliminated by Spain in the quarter-finals.

The final took place at the Estadio Charrúa, Montevideo between Spain and Mexico a rematch from the group stage in 2016. Spain won their first title, beating Mexico 2–1 in the Final.

2019 Algarve Cup

The 2019 Algarve Cup was the 26th edition of the Algarve Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held annually in Portugal. It took place from 27 February to 6 March.

Norway defeated Poland 3–0 in the final to win their fifth title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

CONCACAF Awards

The CONCACAF Awards are an association football award given annually to honor players, match officials and coaches from the North American region. It was established in 2013.Players, Coaches and Referees of any nationality are eligible to be nominated, so long as they meet at least one of the following criteria:

1. Have played/coached/refereed in an official CONCACAF tournament at club or national level

2. Have played/coached/refereed for a CONCACAF member national team in a FIFA-sanctioned international competition

3. Have played/coached/refereed in a domestic league within CONCACAF's territory.For each award, an initial shortlist of 20 nominees was established by CONCACAF's 41 Member Associations and CONCACAF competitions' Technical Study Groups.

The final shortlist is voted on by three groups; Member Associations' national team coaches and captains, media, and fans. Each group's votes will provide a third of the total outcome.

Canada women's national soccer team

The Canada women's national soccer team (French: Équipe du Canada féminine de soccer) is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

The team reached international prominence at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, losing in the third place match to the United States. Canada qualified for its first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 2008, making it to the quarterfinals. Canada are two-time CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions, and two-time Olympic bronze medalists from London 2012 where they defeated France 1–0 in Coventry and from Rio de Janeiro 2016, after defeating hosts Brazil 2–1 in São Paulo.A certain segment of the Canadian women's soccer fans are closely linked to the U-20 team (U-19 prior to 2006), partly due to Canada hosting the inaugural FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship in 2002, a tournament in which the team won silver in front of 47,784 fans at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta. Canada also hosted the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they were eliminated in the quarterfinals by England. Canada set the tournament and team record for attendance in the process, with 1,353,506 and 54,027 respectively.

Football at the 2011 Pan American Games – Women's tournament

The women's association football tournament at the 2011 Pan American Games was held in Guadalajara, Mexico at the Omnilife Stadium from October 18 to October 27. Associations affiliated with FIFA that qualified were invited to send their full women's national teams.For these Games, the women competed in an 8-team tournament, which is a drop from 10 at the 2007 games. The defending champions are Brazil, who won the title on home field.

Football at the 2011 Summer Universiade – Women's tournament

The women's tournament of football at the 2011 Summer Universiade in China began on August 11 and ended on August 22.

Men's winners
Women's winners
Mixed

Languages

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