Luca Cordero di Montezemolo

Luca Cordero di Montezemolo (Italian pronunciation: [ˈluːka korˈdɛːro di ˌmontedˈdzɛːmolo; -dˈdzeːm-]; born 31 August 1947) is an Italian businessman, former Chairman of Ferrari, and formerly Chairman of Fiat S.p.A. and President of Confindustria and FIEG. He comes from an aristocratic family from the region of Piedmont in Italy. He graduated with a degree in law from La Sapienza University in 1971. Afterward, he studied for a masters degree in international commercial law at Columbia University.[1] He is one of the founders and former president of NTV, an Italian company which is Europe's first private open access operator of 300 km/h (186 mph) high-speed trains.[2]

In 2009, Montezemolo founded Future Italy, a free market think tank that joined Civic Choice in the 2013 Italian parliamentary election.

Luca Cordero di Montezemolo
Luca Cordero di Montezemolo
Born31 August 1947 (age 71)
NationalityItalian
Alma materSapienza University
Columbia University
Occupationformer Chairman of Alitalia, former president of Confindustria
Known forFormer President of Ferrari S.p.A
Former Chairman of Fiat S.p.A.
Spouse(s)Ludovica Andreoni (m. 2000)
Children5

Biography

Ancestry and family background

Born in Bologna, Italy, he is the youngest son of Massimo Cordero dei Marchesi di Montezemolo (1920–2009), a Piedmontese aristocrat whose family served the Royal House of Savoy for generations, and Clotilde Neri (b. 1922), niece of famed Italian surgeon Vincenzo Neri. His uncle, Admiral Giorgio Cordero dei Marchesi di Montezemolo (1918–1986) was a commander in the Regia Marina in World War II. His grandfather, Mario (1888–1960) and great-grandfather Carlo (1858–1943) were both Generals in the Italian Army. He is also a relation to Andrea Cordero Lanza di Montezemolo (his father Massimo and Andrea were cousins), who became a cardinal in 2006 and whose father, colonel Giuseppe Cordero di Montezemolo, was killed by the Nazi occupation troops during the massacre of the Fosse Ardeatine in Rome in 1944. His surname is actually "Cordero di Montezemolo" and the correct usage is either the full surname or just Montezemolo (omitting the "di").[3]

Career

Fiat Luca cordero di Montezemolo
Luca Cordero di Montezemolo in 2008
Luca Cordero di Montezemolo - GianAngelo Pistoia
Luca Cordero di Montezemolo on Ferrari F300

Montezemolo's sporting career began at the wheel of a Giannini Fiat 500 which he raced together with his friend Cristiano Rattazzi. Later, Montezemolo briefly drove for the privately owned Lancia rally team known as HF Squadra Corse. He joined the auto manufacturing conglomerate FIAT S.p.A., headquartered in Torino, Italy, and in 1973 was moved to Ferrari, where he became Enzo Ferrari's assistant and, in 1974, manager of the Scuderia. During his involvement with the team, Ferrari won the Formula One World Championship with Niki Lauda in 1975 and 1977. In 1976 Montezemolo was promoted to become head of all FIAT racing activities, and in 1977 he advanced to become a senior manager of FIAT.

Throughout the 1980s, Montezemolo occupied a number of positions in the FIAT empire, including managing director of the drinks company Cinzano and director of the publishing company Itedi. In 1982, he managed America's Cup challenge of Team Azzurra, the first Italian yacht club to enter the event. In 1985, he became manager of the Organizing Committee for 1990 World Cup Italia.

In November 1991, FIAT Chairman Gianni Agnelli appointed Montezemolo president of Ferrari, which had been struggling since Enzo Ferrari's death. Montezemolo made it his personal goal to win the Formula One World Constructors' Championship once again. Montezemolo quickly made changes at the Italian team, signing up Niki Lauda as consultant and promoting Claudio Lombardi to team manager role.[4] During the 1990s he resurrected the Ferrari road car business from heavy debts into solid profit. He also took on the presidency of Maserati when Ferrari acquired it in 1997, until 2005.

Under Montezemolo and executive director Jean Todt, the Ferrari Formula One team won the World Drivers' Championship in 2000, the first time since 1979. The previous year, 1999, they had won the Constructors' Championship for the first time since 1983.

Luca di Montezemolo con Paolo Poli
Montezemolo in 2012

On 27 May 2004, Montezemolo became president of Italian business lobby Confindustria. Days later, following the death of Umberto Agnelli on 28 May, he was elected chairman of Fiat S.p.A., Ferrari's parent company. Since 20 December 2004, he has also been president of the LUISS, the Free International University for Social Studies Guido Carli in Rome.

Montezemolo has often been reported to have aspirations of a career in Italian politics, most recently the office of Prime Minister, but has always denied the rumours.[5]

On 29 July 2008, Montezemolo founded the Formula One Teams Association (FOTA) which he presided over from 2008 to 2010, eventually being replaced by McLaren CEO Martin Whitmarsh. The Committee used to meet on a regular basis to discuss improvements to Formula One. FOTA was formally dissolved in 2014.

In April 2010, John Elkann replaced Montezemolo as Chairman of Fiat S.p.A.[6]

On 10 September 2014, Montezemolo resigned as president and chairman of Ferrari following increasing tension with his would-be successor, FIAT Chrysler CEO, Sergio Marchionne.[7]

On 26 November 2014, Montezemolo was appointed non-executive chairman of the Board of Directors of Italian flag carrier Alitalia.[8] In February 2015 he became committee president of the Rome bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics.

On 24 July 2015, he was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame.

He received the America Award of the Italy-USA Foundation in 2017.

Legal issues

After being president of Confindustria for four years, Montezemolo was sentenced to one year imprisonment by the court in Naples for the unauthorized construction of his personal residence in Anacapri, Italy.[9]

Awards

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Jacques Villeneuve
Lorenzo Bandini Trophy
1997
Succeeded by
Giancarlo Fisichella

References

  1. ^ Joshua Levine (29 September 2011). "La Bella Vita". The Wall Street Journal.
  2. ^ Murray Hughes (2008-09-01). "NTV targets 20% market share by 2015". Railway Gazette International.
  3. ^ "Arms of Roberto Cordero di Montezemolo, Noble of the Marquises of Montezemolo". Archived from the original on 2009-02-03.
  4. ^ Zapelloni, Umberto (April 2004). Formula Ferrari. Hodder & Stoughton. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-340-83471-8.
  5. ^ "di Montezemolo says no to a political career". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 2007-06-01. Retrieved 2007-06-01.
  6. ^ "Fiat taps Elkann as chairman, revives auto unit spin off". The Economic Times. 21 April 2010. Retrieved 11 September 2014.
  7. ^ "Montezemolo resigned". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 2014-09-10. Retrieved 2014-09-10.
  8. ^ Oud-topman Ferrari in raad van Alitalia – De Telegraaf ‹See Tfd›(in Dutch)
  9. ^ "Abusi edilizi a Capri, un anno di condanna per Montezemolo". Corriere Della Sera. 7 May 2012.

External links

2009 24 Hours of Le Mans

The 2009 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 24 Heures du Mans 2009) was the 77th Grand Prix of Endurance, an endurance auto race run over 24 hours. It took place at the Circuit de la Sarthe, Le Mans, France, and was organised by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) over 13–14 June 2009 and was started by Fiat and Ferrari chairman Luca Cordero di Montezemolo at 15:00 local time (13:00 UTC). A test day was initially scheduled for 31 May that year, but was canceled by the ACO due to economic concerns. The race was attended by 234,800 spectators.Peugeot succeeded in winning the race in the third year of the 908 HDi FAP program with drivers David Brabham, Marc Gené, and Alexander Wurz driving the No. 9 car for 382 laps; an all-French driving squad secured second place for Peugeot as well. Audi, who had won eight of the last ten Le Mans, finished third in their new R15 TDI. Team Essex gave Porsche their second LMP2 victory in a row, while the American Corvette Racing team earned their first GT1 win since 2006. Risi Competizione Ferrari led the GT2 category for their second straight victory in the class.

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Cordero

Cordero is a Spanish and Italian surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Andrea Cordero Lanza di Montezemolo (1925–2017), Italian cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church

Angel Cordero Jr. (b. 1942), Puerto Rican jockey

Atilano Cordero Badillo (b. 1943), Puerto Rican entrepreneur and supermarket owner

Chad Cordero (b. 1982), American professional baseball player

Desirée Cordero Ferrer (b. 1993), Spanish model and beauty pageant titleholder, Miss Spain 2014, and Top 10 at Miss Universe 2014

Eugene Cordero, American actor

Federico A. Cordero (1928–2012), Puerto Rican classical guitarist

Francisco Cordero (b. 1975), Dominican professional baseball player

Gilda Cordero-Fernando (b. 1932), Filipina writer and publisher

Joaquín Cordero (1923–2013), Mexican actor

Jorge Cordero (musician) (born 1952), Cuban singer, guitarist and percussionist

Jorge Cordero (footballer) (born 1962), Peruvian footballer

Juan Cordero (1822–1884), Mexican painter and muralist

Juan César Cordero Dávila (1904–1965), Puerto Rican Major General in the US Army during the Korean War

León Febres Cordero (1931–2008), President of Ecuador 1984–1988

Luca Cordero di Montezemolo (b. 1947), Italian businessman, Chairman of Ferrari

Luis Cordero Crespo (1833–1912), President of Ecuador 1892–1895

Maria Cordero (a.k.a. Fat Mama Maria) (b. 1954), singer, actress, and chef from Macau

Mario Cordero (a.k.a. Catato) (1930–2002), Costa Rican professional football player and coach

Miguel Febres Cordero (1854–1910), Ecuadoran educator, member of the Christian Brothers order

Olga Sánchez Cordero (b. 1955), Mexican jurist, member of the Supreme Court of Justice

Paquito Cordero (1932–2009), Puerto Rican comedian and television producer

Rafael "Churumba" Cordero Santiago (1942–2004), Puerto Rican politician, Mayor of Ponce 1989–2004

Rafael Cordero (1790–1868), Puerto Rican educator, known as “The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico”

Rodrigo Cordero (b. 1973), Costa Rican professional football player

Víctor Cordero (b. 1973), Costa Rican professional football player

Roque Cordero (1917–2008), Panamanian-American composer

Sebastián Cordero (b. 1972), Ecuadoran film director, writer, and editor

Wil Cordero (a.k.a. Coco) (b. 1971), Puerto Rican professional baseball player

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Future Italy

Future Italy (Italia Futura, IF) is an Italian liberal-centrist think tank, formed in 2009 by Luca Cordero di Montezemolo, chairman of Alitalia (since 2014) and former chairman of Ferrari (1991–2014), FIAT (2004–2010) and Confindustria (2004–2008).Between 2013 and 2014, IF acted as a de facto internal faction of Civic Choice, a centrist party launched by Mario Monti.

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The group was formed on 12 November 2011 by five disgruntled members of Silvio Berlusconi's The People of Freedom party and coalition: Roberto Antonione, Giustina Destro, Fabio Gava, Giancarlo Pittelli and Luciano Sardelli. They were mainly former Liberals and Socialists who came out in opposition to Berlusconi just a few weeks before his final resignation on 12 November. They soon formed an alliance with the new Italian Liberal Party (PLI), hence the LI–PLI acronym.In March 2012 Pittelli, the only former Christian Democrat of the group, left in order to join Great South.In April 2012 another former Christian Democrat, later member of the PdL, Angelo Santori, joined the group.In December 2012 the Liberals of LpI–PLI joined forces with Free Italy, another splinter group from the PdL, and formed a 10-strong section within the Mixed Group.Both Destro and Gava have announced they would join Future Italy, were Luca Cordero di Montezemolo to transform the think tank into a party.

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New Pole for Italy

The New Pole for Italy (Italian: Nuovo Polo per l'Italia, NPI), better known as the Third Pole (Terzo Polo) and less frequently as Pole of the Nation (Polo della Nazione), was a centrist coalition of parties in Italy active from late 2010 to sometime in 2012.

The NPI was founded on 15 December 2010 both as an alternative to the centre-right coalition between The People of Freedom and Lega Nord led by Silvio Berlusconi, and to the centre-left coalition between the Democratic Party and Italy of Values, led by Pier Luigi Bersani. Most NPI members were former supporters of Berlusconi, but there is also a relevant group of disillusioned Democrats. The constituent members of the coalition were the Union of the Centre (leader: Pier Ferdinando Casini), Future and Freedom (Gianfranco Fini), Alliance for Italy (Francesco Rutelli) and the Movement for the Autonomies (Raffaele Lombardo).

The NPI, which was never an electoral coalition, was disbanded sometime in 2012, after Casini announced that he was no longer interested in the project. Rutelli's ApI even returned to the centre-left and one of its members, Bruno Tabacci, decided to run in the 2012 Italian centre-left primary election.In September 2012 Luca Cordero di Montezemolo announced that he would take part through his Future Italy association to the formation o a new "popular, reform and authentically liberal force" which would hegemonize the political centre of Italian politics, in dialogue with "responsible people" of the established parties. Casini and Fini responded by proposing a joint "List for Italy" without party symbols. In January 2013, after Mario Monti had announced his intention to step in into politics, Future Italy and other groups formed Civic Choice with direct support from Monti. Subsequently, Civic Choice, UdC and FLI joined forces in the With Monti for Italy coalition.

Nuovo Trasporto Viaggiatori

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The leading promoters of the manifesto included Luca Cordero di Montezemolo, Carlo Calenda, Andrea Romano, Nicola Rossi, Irene Tinagli, Federico Vecchioni and their think tank Future Italy, Andrea Riccardi (founder of the Community of Sant'Egidio and minister of International Cooperation in Monti's government), Raffaele Bonanni (Italian Confederation of Workers' Trade Unions), Andrea Olivero (Christian Associations of Italian Workers), Carlo Costalli (Christian Movement of Workers), Lorenzo Dellai (Union for Trentino), Alessio Vianello, Enrico Zanetti and Maria Gomierato on behalf of Toward North, and the Sardinian Reformers.Most of these people and groups followed Monti in his political creature, Civic Choice, which was founded on 4 January 2013.

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