Lou Michaels

Louis Andrew "Lou" Michaels (September 28, 1935 – January 19, 2016) was an American football player who was a standout defensive lineman for the University of Kentucky Wildcats from 1955 to 1957. After Kentucky's victory over archrival Tennessee in 1957, Michaels was quoted as saying, "Nothing sucks like a Big Orange." Michaels played professionally for 14 years, 1958–71, with the Los Angeles Rams, Pittsburgh Steelers, Baltimore Colts and Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He also excelled as a placekicker, and was selected to the Pro Bowl after the 1962 and 1963 seasons.

Michaels was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1992 and into the National Polish American Sports Hall of Fame in 1994. His brother, Walt Michaels, also played in the NFL.

Michaels died January 19, 2016, from pancreatic cancer.[2]

Lou Michaels
No. 55, 83, 79, 75
Position:Placekicker, defensive end
Personal information
Born:September 28, 1935
Swoyersville, Pennsylvania
Died:January 19, 2016 (aged 80)
Swoyersville, Pennsylvania
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:243 lb (110 kg)
Career information
High school:Swoyersville (PA)[1]
College:Kentucky
NFL Draft:1958 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4
Career history
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ Bennett, Steve (December 10, 2012). "Swoyersville Football 1951". Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania: The Citizens' Voice. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
  2. ^ Bennett, Steve (January 19, 2016). "Local football legend Lou Michaels dies". Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania: The Citizens' Voice. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
1919 Eternal

1919 Eternal (also stylized as 1919★Eternal) is the third studio album by the heavy metal band Black Label Society. It was released on March 5, 2002 and was written for Zakk Wylde's father.

1956 All-SEC football team

The 1956 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1956 college football season. Tennessee won the conference.

1956 College Football All-America Team

The 1956 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1956. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1956 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the International News Service (INS), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (6) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

1957 All-SEC football team

The 1957 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1957 college football season. Auburn won the conference.

1957 College Football All-America Team

The 1957 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1957. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1957 season are (1) the Associated Press, (2) the United Press, (3) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (7) the Sporting News. The ESPN College Football Encyclopedia lists the All-America Board (AAB) as an eighth official selector.

1962 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1962. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1965 Baltimore Colts season

The 1965 Baltimore Colts season was the 13th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1965 season with a record of 10 wins, 3 losses, and 1 tie, tied for first in the Western Conference with the Green Bay Packers. Although the Packers won both regular season games over the Colts, no tiebreaking system was in place in 1965, and a playoff game was required to determine the Western Conference champion, who would host the Eastern Conference champion Cleveland Browns for the NFL title.

1965 Green Bay Packers season

The 1965 Green Bay Packers season was their 47th season overall and their 45th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–3–1 record under seventh-year head coach Vince Lombardi, earning a tie for first place in the Western Conference with the Baltimore Colts.

In the final regular season game at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco, a late touchdown by the 49ers caused a tie and dropped Green Bay into a tie with the Colts. Although the Packers defeated Baltimore twice during the regular season, the rules at the time required a tiebreaker playoff, played in Green Bay on December 26. With backup quarterbacks playing for both teams, the Packers tied the Colts late and won in overtime, 13–10.Green Bay then met the defending champion Cleveland Browns (11–3) in the NFL championship game, also at Green Bay. The Packers won, 23–12, for their ninth NFL title and third under Lombardi. It was the last NFL championship game before the advent of the Super Bowl and the first of three consecutive league titles for Green Bay.

Known as "New City Stadium" for its first eight seasons, the Packers' venue in Green Bay was renamed Lambeau Field in August 1965 in memory of Packers founder, player, and long-time head coach, Curly Lambeau, who had died two months earlier.

1965 NFL season

The 1965 NFL season was the 46th regular season of the National Football League. The Green Bay Packers won the NFL title after defeating the Cleveland Browns in the championship game, the last before the Super Bowl era.

1966 Baltimore Colts season

The 1966 Baltimore Colts season was the 14th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1966 season with a record of 9 wins and 5 losses and finished second in the Western Conference.

1967 Baltimore Colts season

The 1967 Baltimore Colts season was the 15th season for the team in the National Football League. They finished the regular season with a record of 11 wins, 1 loss, and 2 ties, the same record in the Western Conference's Coastal division with the Los Angeles Rams. However, the Colts lost the tiebreaker based on point differential in head-to-head games and thus did not make the playoffs.

The Colts' official winning percentage of .917 (based on the NFL's non-counting of ties for such purposes prior to 1972) is the best in North American professional sports history for a non-playoff-qualifying team.

1967 New Orleans Saints season

The 1967 New Orleans Saints season was the inaugural season for the franchise. The team went 3–11, finishing in last place in the four-team NFL Eastern Conference Capitol Division.

1968 NFL Championship Game

The 1968 National Football League championship game was the 36th annual championship game. The winner of the game represented the NFL in the third AFL-NFL World Championship Game also called the Super Bowl. The NFL title game was held December 29 at Cleveland Municipal Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio.

1968 NFL playoffs

The NFL playoffs following the 1968 NFL season determined who would represent the league in Super Bowl III.

1969 Baltimore Colts season

The 1969 Baltimore Colts season was the 17th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1969 season with a record of 8 wins, 5 losses and 1 tie. They finished second in the Western Conference's Coastal division.

Coach Don Shula was let go after the season, a disappointing one many attributed to the hangover of losing to the heavy-underdog Jets in the Super Bowl the year before. It is one of the first instances of a Super Bowl hangover – in which the team that played in a Super Bowl the previous season, underperforms the next season.

1971 Green Bay Packers season

The 1971 Green Bay Packers season was their 53rd season overall and their 51st season in the National Football League (NFL). The club posted a 4–8–2 record under first-year coach Dan Devine, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division.

Kentucky Wildcats football

The Kentucky Wildcats football program represents the University of Kentucky in the sport of American football. The Wildcats compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Wildcats play their home games at Kroger Field in Lexington, Kentucky and are currently led by head coach Mark Stoops.

Mike Clark (placekicker)

Michael Vincent Clark (November 7, 1940 – July 24, 2002) was an American football placekicker in the National Football League for the Philadelphia Eagles, Pittsburgh Steelers, Dallas Cowboys and Buffalo Bills. He played college football at Texas A&M University.

Swoyersville, Pennsylvania

Swoyersville is a borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 5,062 at the 2010 census. Swoyersville is located within the Wyoming Valley West School District.

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