Lou Gehrig Memorial Award

The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is given annually to a Major League Baseball (MLB) player who best exhibits the character and integrity of Lou Gehrig, both on the field and off it.[1] The award was created by the Phi Delta Theta fraternity in honor of Gehrig, who was a member of the fraternity at Columbia University. It was first presented in 1955, fourteen years after Gehrig's death. The award's purpose is to recognize a player's exemplary contributions in "both his community and philanthropy."[1] The bestowal of the award is overseen by the headquarters of the Phi Delta Theta in Oxford, Ohio,[2] and the name of each winner is inscribed onto the Lou Gehrig Award plaque in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. It is the only MLB award conferred by a fraternity.[1]

Twenty-four winners of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.[3] The inaugural winner was Alvin Dark.[4] Curt Schilling (1995) and Shane Victorino (2008) received the award for working with the ALS Association and raising money for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The disease took Gehrig's life and is eponymously known as "Lou Gehrig's disease".[5][6] Mike Timlin won the award in 2007 for his efforts in raising awareness and finding a cure for ALS, which took his mother's life in 2002.[7]

Winners of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award have undertaken a variety of different causes. Many winners, including Rick Sutcliffe,[8] Barry Larkin,[9] Mark McGwire,[10] Todd Stottlemyre[11] and Derek Jeter,[12] worked with children in need. Jeter assisted children and teenagers in avoiding drug and alcohol addiction[12] through his Turn 2 Foundation,[13] while Sutcliffe visited disabled children in hospitals[8] and bestowed college scholarships to underprivileged juveniles through his foundation.[14] Other winners devoted their work to aiding individuals who had a specific illness, such as Albert Pujols, whose daughter suffers from Down syndrome, and who devoted the Pujols Family Foundation to helping those with the disorder,[15] and Ryan Zimmerman, who established the ziMS Foundation to raise money for multiple sclerosis, the disease which afflicts his mother.[16][17]

Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
A smiling man in a dark cap and white pinstriped baseball uniform with an interlocked "N" and "Y" on the left breast.
Lou Gehrig, the namesake of the award
LocationCooperstown, New York
CountryUnited States
Presented byPhi Delta Theta
History
First award1955
Most recentJoey Votto, Cincinnati Reds
WebsiteLou Gehrig Memorial Award

Winners

Alvin Dark 1953
Alvin Dark won the inaugural Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1955.
Cal Ripken Jr. in 1993
Cal Ripken, Jr., the 1992 winner, surpassed Gehrig's record for consecutive games played three years later.[18]
Derek Jeter batting stance allison
Derek Jeter, the 2010 winner, broke Gehrig's record for most hits as a member of the New York Yankees the year before.[19]
Josh Hamilton on June 10, 2013
Josh Hamilton won the award in 2014.
Key
Year Links to the article about the corresponding baseball year
Player Name of the player
Team The player's team at the time he won the award
Position The player's position at the time he won the award
dagger Member of the Baseball Hall of Fame
double-dagger Player is active
Winners
Year Player Team Position Ref
1955 Alvin Dark New York Giants Shortstop [20]
1956 Pee Wee Reesedagger Brooklyn Dodgers Shortstop [21]
1957 Stan Musialdagger St. Louis Cardinals First baseman [22]
1958 Gil McDougald New York Yankees Second baseman [23]
1959 Gil Hodges Los Angeles Dodgers First baseman [24]
1960 Dick Groat Pittsburgh Pirates Shortstop [25]
1961 Warren Spahndagger Milwaukee Braves Pitcher [26]
1962 Robin Robertsdagger Baltimore Orioles Pitcher [27]
1963 Bobby Richardson New York Yankees Second baseman [28]
1964 Ken Boyer St. Louis Cardinals Third baseman [29]
1965 Vern Law Pittsburgh Pirates Pitcher [30]
1966 Brooks Robinsondagger Baltimore Orioles Third baseman [31]
1967 Ernie Banksdagger Chicago Cubs First baseman [32]
1968 Al Kalinedagger Detroit Tigers Outfielder [33]
1969 Pete Rose Cincinnati Reds Outfielder [34]
1970 Hank Aarondagger Atlanta Braves Outfielder [35]
1971 Harmon Killebrewdagger Minnesota Twins Outfielder [36]
1972 Wes Parker Los Angeles Dodgers First baseman [37]
1973 Ron Santodagger Chicago Cubs Third baseman [38]
1974 Willie Stargelldagger Pittsburgh Pirates First baseman [39]
1975 Johnny Benchdagger Cincinnati Reds Catcher [40]
1976 Don Suttondagger Los Angeles Dodgers Pitcher [41]
1977 Lou Brockdagger St. Louis Cardinals Outfielder [42]
1978 Don Kessinger Chicago White Sox Shortstop [43]
1979 Phil Niekrodagger Atlanta Braves Pitcher [44]
1980 Tony Pérezdagger Boston Red Sox First baseman [45]
1981 Tommy John New York Yankees Pitcher [46]
1982 Ron Cey Los Angeles Dodgers Third baseman [47]
1983 Mike Schmidtdagger Philadelphia Phillies Third baseman [48]
1984 Steve Garvey San Diego Padres First baseman [49]
1985 Dale Murphy Atlanta Braves Outfielder [50]
1986 George Brettdagger Kansas City Royals Third baseman [51]
1987 Rick Sutcliffe Chicago Cubs Pitcher [52]
1988 Buddy Bell Houston Astros Third baseman [53]
1989 Ozzie Smithdagger St. Louis Cardinals Shortstop [54]
1990 Glenn Davis Houston Astros First baseman [55]
1991 Kent Hrbek Minnesota Twins First baseman [56]
1992 Cal Ripken, Jr.dagger Baltimore Orioles Shortstop [57]
1993 Don Mattingly New York Yankees First baseman [58]
1994 Barry Larkindagger Cincinnati Reds Shortstop [59]
1995 Curt Schilling Philadelphia Phillies Pitcher [60]
1996 Brett Butler Los Angeles Dodgers Outfielder [61]
1997 Paul Molitordagger Minnesota Twins Designated hitter [62]
1998 Tony Gwynndagger San Diego Padres Outfielder [63]
1999 Mark McGwire St. Louis Cardinals First baseman [64]
2000 Todd Stottlemyre Arizona Diamondbacks Pitcher [65]
2001 John Franco New York Mets Pitcher [66]
2002 Danny Graves Cincinnati Reds Pitcher [67]
2003 Jamie Moyer Seattle Mariners Pitcher [68]
2004 Jim Thomedagger Philadelphia Phillies First baseman [69]
2005 John Smoltzdagger Atlanta Braves Pitcher [70]
2006 Trevor Hoffmandagger San Diego Padres Pitcher [71]
2007 Mike Timlin Boston Red Sox Pitcher [72]
2008 Shane Victorino Philadelphia Phillies Outfielder [73]
2009 Albert Pujolsdouble-dagger St. Louis Cardinals First baseman [74]
2010 Derek Jeter New York Yankees Shortstop [75]
2011 Ryan Zimmermandouble-dagger Washington Nationals Third baseman [76]
2012 Barry Zito San Francisco Giants Pitcher [77]
2013 Josh Hamilton Los Angeles Angels Outfielder [78]
2014 Adrián Beltré Texas Rangers Third baseman [79]
2015 Curtis Grandersondouble-dagger New York Mets Outfielder [80]
2016 José Altuvedouble-dagger Houston Astros Second baseman [81]
2017 Joey Vottodouble-dagger Cincinnati Reds First baseman [82]

See also

References

General

  • "The Hutch Award, Lou Gehrig Award, Babe Ruth Award & Roberto Clemente Award Winners". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  • "Lou Gehrig Memorial Award". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved August 12, 2012.

Specific

  1. ^ a b c "The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award". Phi Delta Theta International Site. Retrieved November 6, 2012.
  2. ^ Dickson, Paul (June 13, 2011). The Dickson Baseball Dictionary. W. W. Norton & Company. p. 518. ISBN 9780393073492. Retrieved November 9, 2012.
  3. ^ "Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 9, 2012.
  4. ^ "Gehrig Award Is Given To Dark". The Modesto Bee. United Press International. January 9, 1956. p. 18. Retrieved January 15, 2013.
  5. ^ "Schilling gets Gehrig Award". Reading Eagle. January 4, 1996. p. C5. Retrieved January 15, 2013.
  6. ^ "Phillies' Shane Victorino Wins Phi Delta Theta's Lou Gehrig Award". Phi Delta Theta International Site. Archived from the original on August 5, 2012. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  7. ^ "Mike Timlin – Boston Red Sox". Phi Delta Theta International Site. Archived from the original on August 5, 2012. Retrieved January 15, 2013.
  8. ^ a b Verdi, Bob (December 27, 1987). "Cubs Sutcliffe an ace on and off the field". The Beaver County Times. p. C12. Retrieved November 14, 2012.
  9. ^ "Larkin will receive Lou Gehrig Award". The Cincinnati Post. January 25, 1995. p. 4B. Retrieved January 15, 2013. (subscription required)
  10. ^ "McGwire Wins Gehrig Memorial Award". Associated Press. March 17, 2000. Retrieved January 15, 2013. (subscription required)
  11. ^ "Pitcher Todd Stottlemyre wins the Lou Gehrig Memorial award". Star-News. Wilmington. September 19, 2001. p. 9. Retrieved January 15, 2013.
  12. ^ a b "Turn 2 Foundation Mission Statement". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved November 6, 2012.
  13. ^ Berry, Adam (January 18, 2012). "Jeter honored with Lou Gehrig Memorial Award". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on October 10, 2012. Retrieved November 6, 2012.
  14. ^ "Sutcliffe given Gehrig Memorial Award". The Evening News. Newburgh. Associated Press. November 24, 1987. p. 2B. Retrieved November 14, 2012.
  15. ^ "Albert Pujols Wins Phi Delta Theta's Lou Gehrig Award". Phi Delta Theta International Site. Archived from the original on August 5, 2012. Retrieved January 15, 2013.
  16. ^ "Ryan Zimmerman to be presented with the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award" (PDF). ziMS Foundation. Washington Nationals. June 25, 2012. Retrieved January 16, 2012.
  17. ^ Wagner, James (June 25, 2012). "Ryan Zimmerman honored for his charitable work with the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  18. ^ Connolly, Dan; Kubatko, Roch; Ordine, Bill (September 6, 2005). "Memories play on, 10 years later: A look back at the night Cal Ripken broke Lou Gehrig's record for consecutive games played". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved January 14, 2013.
  19. ^ DiComo, Anthony (September 12, 2009). "Jeter passes Gehrig with 2,722nd hit". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  20. ^ "Al Dark Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  21. ^ "Pee Wee Reese Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  22. ^ "Stan Musial Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  23. ^ "Gil McDougald Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  24. ^ "Gil Hodges Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  25. ^ "Dick Groat Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  26. ^ "Warren Spahn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  27. ^ "Robin Roberts Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  28. ^ "Bobby Richardson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  29. ^ "Ken Boyer Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  30. ^ "Vern Law Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  31. ^ "Brooks Robinson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  32. ^ "Ernie Banks Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  33. ^ "Al Kaline Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  34. ^ "Pete Rose Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  35. ^ "Hank Aaron Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  36. ^ "Harmon Killebrew Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  37. ^ "Wes Parker Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  38. ^ "Ron Santo Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  39. ^ "Willie Stargell Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  40. ^ "Johnny Bench Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  41. ^ "Don Sutton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  42. ^ "Lou Brock Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  43. ^ "Don Kessinger Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  44. ^ "Phil Niekro Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  45. ^ "Tony Pérez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  46. ^ "Tommy John Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  47. ^ "Ron Cey Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  48. ^ "Mike Schmidt Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  49. ^ "Steve Garvey Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  50. ^ "Dale Murphy Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  51. ^ "George Brett Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  52. ^ "Rick Sutcliffe Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  53. ^ "Buddy Bell Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  54. ^ "Ozzie Smith Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  55. ^ "Glenn Davis Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  56. ^ "Kent Hrbek Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  57. ^ "Cal Ripken Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  58. ^ "Don Mattingly Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  59. ^ "Barry Larkin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  60. ^ "Curt Schilling Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  61. ^ "Brett Butler Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  62. ^ "Paul Molitor Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  63. ^ "Tony Gwynn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  64. ^ "Mark McGwire Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  65. ^ "Todd Stottlemyre Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  66. ^ "John Franco Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  67. ^ "Danny Graves Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  68. ^ "Jamie Moyer Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  69. ^ "Jim Thome Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  70. ^ "John Smoltz Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  71. ^ "Trevor Hoffman Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  72. ^ "Mike Timlin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  73. ^ "Shane Victorino Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  74. ^ "Albert Pujols Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  75. ^ "Derek Jeter Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  76. ^ "Ryan Zimmerman Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  77. ^ "Barry Zito Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 14, 2013.
  78. ^ "Josh Hamilton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 28, 2014.
  79. ^ "Adrián Beltré Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  80. ^ "Curtis Granderson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 19, 2016.
  81. ^ "José Altuve Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 19, 2016.
  82. ^ "Joey Votto Lou Gehrig Award Winner". phideltatheta.org. Phi Delta Theta. Retrieved March 30, 2018.
1964 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1970 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1976 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1984 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1984 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1985 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1985 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

Atlanta Braves award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Atlanta Braves professional baseball franchise, including its years in Boston (1871–1952) and Milwaukee (1953–1965).

Cliff Garrison

Clifford Raymond Garrison (August 13, 1906 – February 9, 1994) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox during the 1928 and 1929 seasons. Drafted in the second round of the 1928 Major League Baseball Draft and listed at 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 180 lb., Garrison batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Bowling Green, Ohio.

Garrison attended North Baltimore High School, where he set a school record 57 touchdowns in his three years, a record that remains unbroken today. While attending Ohio State University, he was initiated as a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Initially, Garrison went to Ohio State on a football scholarship, where he was preparing to pursue a degree in engineering. However, before his first semester, under the influence of Boston Red Sox manager Lee Fohl, he was advised to play on a summer professional baseball team under a false name, Clifford Lewis, despite the fact that it could jeopardize his collegiate sports eligibility.

Professionally, Garrison posted a 2.08 ERA with ninety-four strikeouts and 112.0 innings of work in sixteen appearances. His record was 11–2 with three no decisions. Due to an unfortunate car accident in 1929, rendering him unable to pitch, Garrison's career was cut short midway through his second season in Boston. Nonetheless, Garrison continued his involvement in the game of baseball by founding the C. R. Garrison Fellowship Fund, raising money for economically disadvantaged athletes who aspired to play at the collegiate level. With such outstanding success in the field of philanthropy, Garrison became just the fifth man to be awarded the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1959 given annually to a Major League Baseball player who, both on and off the field, best exemplifies the character and integrity of Baseball Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig.

Cliff Garrison died of natural causes at the age of 87 in Palm Beach, Florida with support from his wife of sixty-seven years, Denise, two sons Harry & Robert, grandkids, Rick, Rod, Randy, and the favorite of all, Melissa.

Don Kessinger

Donald Eulon Kessinger (born July 17, 1942 in Forrest City, Arkansas) is an American former professional baseball player and manager. He played in Major League Baseball as a shortstop from 1964 to 1979 for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and the Chicago White Sox. A six-time All-Star, he was a light-hitting, defensive specialist who spent the majority of his career as the Chicago Cubs starting shortstop. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he was considered one of the best shortstops in baseball. Kessinger is also notable for being the last player-manager in American League history.

Houston Astros award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Houston Astros professional baseball team.

Jim Thome

James Howard Thome (; born August 27, 1970) is an American former professional baseball player who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), from 1991 to 2012. He played for six different teams, most notably the Cleveland Indians, during the 1990s and early 2000s. A prolific power hitter, Thome hit 612 home runs during his career — the eighth-most all time — along with 2,328 hits, 1,699 runs batted in (RBIs), and a .276 batting average. He was a member of five All-Star teams and won a Silver Slugger Award in 1996.

Thome grew up in Peoria, Illinois, as part of a large blue-collar family of athletes, who predominantly played baseball and basketball. After attending Illinois Central College, he was drafted by the Indians in the 1989 draft, and made his big league debut in 1991. Early in his career, Thome played third base, before eventually becoming a first baseman. With the Indians, he was part of a core of players that led the franchise to two World Series appearances in three years during the mid-1990s. Thome spent over a decade with the Tribe, before leaving via free agency after the 2002 season, to join the Philadelphia Phillies, with whom he spent the following three seasons. Traded to the Chicago White Sox before the 2006 season, he won the American League (AL) Comeback Player of the Year Award that year and joined the 500 home run club during his three-season tenure with the ChiSox. By this point in his career, back pain limited Thome to being a designated hitter. After stints with the Los Angeles Dodgers and Minnesota Twins, he made brief returns to Cleveland and Philadelphia, before ending his career with the Baltimore Orioles. Upon retiring, Thome accepted an executive position with the White Sox.

Throughout his career, Thome's strength was power hitting. In six different seasons, he hit more than 40 home runs, and in 2003, he led the National League in home runs with 47. Thome’s career on-base plus slugging (OPS) of .956 is 19th, all-time. In 2011, he became only the eighth MLB player to hit 600 home runs. As of 2017, Thome is the career leader in walk-off home runs with 13. One of his trademarks was his unique batting stance, in which he held the bat out with his right hand and pointed it at right field before the pitcher threw, something he first saw in The Natural. Thome was known for his consistently positive attitude and "gregarious" personality. An active philanthropist during his playing career, he was honored with two Marvin Miller Man of the Year Awards and a Lou Gehrig Memorial Award, for his community involvement. In 2018, Thome was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

List of Atlanta Braves first-round draft picks

The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Atlanta, Georgia. They play in the National League East division. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur clubs to its franchises. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks. Since the establishment of the draft in 1965, the Braves have selected 56 players in the first round.

Of those 56 players, 27 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 15 of these were right-handed, while 12 were left-handed. The Braves have also selected eight outfielders, seven shortstops, five catchers, four third basemen, three first basemen, and two second basemen in the initial round of the draft. The franchise has drafted nine players from colleges or high schools in the state of Florida, more than any other state. Eight more selections have come from their home state of Georgia. Two selections have come from outside the 50 United States: Luis Atilano (2003) is from the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and Scott Thorman (2000) is from Ontario, Canada.

Four of these players have won a World Series championship with the Braves—Kent Mercker, Steve Avery, Chipper Jones, and Mike Kelly—all as part of the 1995 championship team. The team's 1974 selection, Dale Murphy, won consecutive National League Most Valuable Player Awards (NL MVP) in 1982 and 1983, the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1985, and the Roberto Clemente Award in 1988. Bob Horner, the Braves' 1978 selection, won the National League Rookie of the Year Award in the same year. Chipper Jones, drafted by the Braves in 1990, won the NL MVP Award in 1999. The Braves have held the first overall pick twice; in 1978 they used it to select Horner, and in 1990 they chose Chipper Jones.

Atlanta has made 13 selections in the supplemental round of the draft. They have also received three compensatory picks since the first draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Braves failed to sign 1995 selection Chad Hutchinson, for which they received the 35th overall pick in the 1996 draft, which they used to draft Jason Marquis.

List of Baltimore Orioles awards

This is a list of award winners and single-season league leaders for the Baltimore Orioles professional baseball team.

List of Cincinnati Reds first-round draft picks

The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Cincinnati, Ohio. They play in the National League Central division. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur clubs to its franchises. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks. Since the establishment of the draft in 1965, the Reds have selected 58 players in the first round.

Of those 58 players, 28 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 22 of these were right-handed, while 6 were left-handed. The Reds have also selected 12 outfielders, eight shortstops, four catchers, four third basemen and two first basemen. They have never selected a second baseman in the initial round of the draft. The franchise has drafted eleven players from colleges or high schools in California, while another eight were drafted out of Texas. The only first-round pick out of the Reds' home state of Ohio was Barry Larkin, a native of Cincinnati.One of these picks has been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame; Barry Larkin, drafted in 1985, was elected to the Hall in his third year of eligibility in 2012. Five of these picks have won a World Series championship with the Reds. Don Gullett & Gary Nolan won two consecutive Series with the Reds, 1975 and 1976, and Gullett won again in 1977 as a member of the New York Yankees. Three of the Reds first-round picks participated in the team's 1990 championship: Larkin, Scott Scudder, and Jack Armstrong. In addition to eventually reaching the Hall of Fame, Larkin was awarded the Roberto Clemente Award in 1993, the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1994, and named the National League Most Valuable Player in 1995.Cincinnati has made ten selections in the supplemental round of the draft, but has never held the first overall pick. They have also had two compensatory picks since the first draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Reds have failed to sign their first-round pick twice. Mike Miley, selected in 1971, chose to attend college at Louisiana State University; he would later be drafted by the California Angels in 1974. The Reds did not receive a compensatory pick for failing to sign Miley. Jeremy Sowers, the Reds' 2001 choice, decided to attend Vanderbilt University, and was selected in the first round of the 2004 draft by the Cleveland Indians. Sowers' MLB debut came in 2006 against Cincinnati. For failing to sign Sowers, the Reds received the 40th pick in the 2002 draft, which they used to select Mark Schramek.

List of Philadelphia Phillies award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Philadelphia Phillies professional baseball team.

Lou Gehrig

Henry Louis Gehrig (born Heinrich Ludwig Gehrig; June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American professional baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (1923–1939). Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, which earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse". He was an All-Star seven consecutive times, a Triple Crown winner once, an American League (AL) Most Valuable Player twice, and a member of six World Series champion teams. He had a career .340 batting average, .632 slugging average, and a .447 on base average. He hit 493 home runs and had 1,995 runs batted in (RBI). In 1939, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame and was the first MLB player to have his uniform number (4) retired by a team.

A native of New York City and a student at Columbia University, Gehrig signed with the Yankees in 1923. He set several major-league records during his career, including the most career grand slams (23) (since broken by Alex Rodriguez) and most consecutive games played (2,130), a record that stood for 56 years and was long considered unbreakable until surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr., in 1995. Gehrig's consecutive game streak ended on May 2, 1939, when he voluntarily took himself out of the lineup, stunning both players and fans, after his performance on the field became hampered by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, an incurable neuromuscular illness; it is now commonly referred to in North America as "Lou Gehrig's disease". The disease forced him to retire at age 36, and was the cause of his death two years later. The pathos of his farewell from baseball was capped off by his iconic 1939 "Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth" speech at Yankee Stadium.

In 1969, the Baseball Writers' Association of America voted Gehrig the greatest first baseman of all time, and he was the leading vote-getter on the MLB All-Century Team chosen by fans in 1999. A monument in Gehrig's honor, originally dedicated by the Yankees in 1941, currently resides in Monument Park at Yankee Stadium. The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is given annually to the MLB player who best exhibits Gehrig's integrity and character.

New York Yankees award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the New York Yankees professional baseball team.

Seattle Mariners award winners and league leaders

The following is a list of Seattle Mariners professional baseball players and managers who have won various awards or other accolades from Major League Baseball or other organizations or have led the American League in some statistical category at the end of the season.

Shane Victorino

Shane Patrick Victorino (born November 30, 1980), nicknamed "The Flyin' Hawaiian", is an American former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers, Boston Red Sox, and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. He was primarily a switch-hitter until the 2013 season, when discomfort from various hamstring, back, and knee problems forced him to become an exclusively right-handed batter.

Victorino made his MLB debut with the Padres in 2003. He played for the Phillies from 2005 through 2012. With the Phillies, Victorino won three Gold Glove Awards, was named to two MLB All-Star Games, and was a member of the 2008 World Series champions. With the Red Sox, Victorino won a Gold Glove Award and was a member of the 2013 World Series champions. He also won the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 2008 and the Branch Rickey Award in 2011. On July 27, 2015 Victorino was traded from the Red Sox to the Angels.

St. Louis Cardinals award winners and league leaders

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). Before joining the NL in 1892, they were also a charter member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. Although St. Louis has been the Cardinals' home city for the franchise's entire existence, they were also known as the Brown Stockings, Browns, and Perfectos.

In 134 seasons, the franchise has won more than 10,000 regular season games and appeared in 27 postseasons while claiming 12 interleague championships and 23 league pennants. Eleven of the interleague championships are World Series titles won under the modern format since 1903; 19 of the league pennants are NL pennants, and the other four are AA pennants. Their 11 World Series titles represent the most in the NL and are second in MLB only to the New York Yankees' 27.

The first major award MLB presented for team performance occurred with the World Series champions in 1903, and for individual performance, in 1911 in the American League with the Chalmers Award. The first major award which the National League presented for individual performance was the League Award in 1924, the predecessor of the modern Most Valuable Player Award (MVP). Rogers Hornsby earned the League Award in 1925 making him the first winner of an MVP or its equivalent in franchise history. The following season, the Cardinals won their first modern World Series. They won the first World Series Trophy, following their 1967 World Series title, which, before that year, the World Series champion had never received any kind of official trophy.

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