Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire. Since 1711, all Lords Lieutenant have also been Custos Rotulorum of Bedfordshire.

References

  • J.C. Sainty (1970). "Lieutenancies of Counties, 1585–1642". Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research (Special Supplement No. 8).
  • J.C. Sainty (1979). List of Lieutenants of Counties of England and Wales 1660-1974. London: Swift Printers (Sales) Ltd.
  • Sainty, J. C. "Lord-Lieutenants of Counties (England & Wales) 1974-2005". Retrieved 2008-06-07.
  • Previous Lord Lieutenants
  1. ^ The London Gazette, issue 8435, 25 May 1745
  2. ^ The London Gazette, issue 17334, 21 February 1818
  3. ^ The London Gazette, issue 22332, 2 December 1859
  4. ^ The London Gazette, issue 22569, 26 November 1861
  5. ^ The London Gazette, issue 27849, 31 October 1905
  6. ^ The London Gazette, issue 28629, 23 July 1912
  7. ^ London Gazette, issue no.34241, 10 January 1936
  8. ^ London Gazette, issue no.36039, 1 June 1943
  9. ^ London Gazette, issue no.41095, 7 June 1957
  10. ^ London Gazette, issue no.47522, 28 April 1978
  11. ^ London Gazette, issue no.52466, 5 March 1991
  12. ^ London Gazette, [1]
Beauchamp St John, 17th Baron St John of Bletso

Beauchamp Moubray St John, 17th Baron St John of Bletso (4 December 1844 – 10 May 1912) was an English peer.

St John was born at Melchbourne, the second son of St Andrew St John, 15th Baron St John of Bletso and his wife Eleanor Hussey. He served in the Highland Light Infantry until 1867. He inherited the title Baron St John of Bletso on the death of his brother in 1887 without male heir to become the 17th Baron, and moved to Melchbourne Park, Bedfordshire. He served as Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire from 1905 to 1912.

St John married Helen Charlotte Thornton in 1869 and had a very large family.

His eldest son Henry succeeded to the title, followed by his second son Mowbray.

His daughter Edith married George Lawson Johnston, 1st Baron Luke. Helen died in 1909 and Beauchamp married, secondly, in 1911, to Ethel Susan Lutley (died 1945), daughter of John H. Lutley of Brockhampton Park, Hereford.

Charles Grey, 7th Earl of Kent

Charles Grey (1540s – 26 September 1623) was Earl of Kent from 1615 to his death.

Custos Rotulorum of Bedfordshire

This is a list of people who have served as Custos Rotulorum of Bedfordshire. Since 1711, the function of Custos Rotulorum has been carried out by the Lords Lieutenant of the county.

John Mordaunt, 1st Baron Mordaunt bef. 1544 – aft. 1547

Oliver St John, 1st Baron St John of Bletso bef. 1558 – 1582

John St John, 2nd Baron St John of Bletso bef. 1584 – 1596

Oliver St John, 3rd Baron St John of Bletso 1596–1618

Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Cleveland 1618–1667

Oliver St John, 2nd Earl of Bolingbroke 1667–1681 jointly with

Robert Bruce, 1st Earl of Ailesbury 1671–1685

Thomas Bruce, 2nd Earl of Ailesbury 1685–1689

Paulet St John, 3rd Earl of Bolingbroke 1689–1711For later custodes rotulorum, see Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire.

Dealtry Charles Part

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Dealtry Charles Part (28 February 1882 – 9 February 1961) was sheriff and Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire and an owner of race horses.

Part was the son of Charles Part and Isabella Mackintosh (of Mackintosh). He was educated at Harrow School and was commissioned into the 3rd militia battalion of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders in 1899. He was promoted Lieutenant in 1901. He was commissioned into the regular army as a second-lieutenant in the 21st Lancers on 26 March 1902, was promoted Lieutenant in 1907 and Captain in 1911. He retired before the First World War, but was employed in the Remount Service from 1915 and ended the war as a lieutenant-colonel.

He was High Sheriff of Bedfordshire in 1926 and Lord Lieutenant of the County from 1943 to 1957. He lived at Houghton Hall, Houghton Regis Bedfordshire, and was Joint Master of the Hertfordshire Hounds. He also owned Morvich in Sutherland. In 1938 his horse, Morse Code, ridden by D Morgan, won the Cheltenham Gold Cup. He was knighted in 1957.

His first wife was Edith Christie-Miller and after her death in 1957 he married Avice Myrtilla Long. His funeral at Aldenham parish church in 1961 was conducted by the Bishop of Bedford.

Earl of Upper Ossory

Earl of Upper Ossory was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created on 5 October 1751 for John FitzPatrick, 2nd Baron Gowran, who later represented Bedfordshire in the House of Commons. He was the son of Richard FitzPatrick, who had been created Baron Gowran on 27 April 1715, also in the Peerage of Ireland. Lord Gowran had represented Harristown and Queen's County in the Irish House of Commons before his elevation to the peerage. The first Earl's son, the second Earl, also sat as Member of Parliament for Bedfordshire and was Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire. In 1794, he was created Baron Upper Ossory, of Ampthill in the County of Bedford, in the Peerage of Great Britain. However, all three titles became extinct on his death in 1818.

The Honourable Richard FitzPatrick, younger son of the first Earl, was a soldier and politician. John FitzPatrick, son of the second Earl, was created Baron Castletown in 1869. (His parents were married by a Catholic priest and therefore under English law at the time he was legally "illegitimate")

Francis Cowper, 7th Earl Cowper

Francis Thomas de Grey Cowper, 7th Earl Cowper (11 June 1834 – 18 July 1905), known as Viscount Fordwich from 1837 to 1856, was a British Liberal politician. He was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1880 to 1882.

Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford

Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford (13 May 1788 – 14 May 1861), styled Marquess of Tavistock from 1802 to 1839, was a British peer and Whig politician.

George Lawson Johnston, 1st Baron Luke

George Lawson Johnston, 1st Baron Luke, KBE (9 September 1873 – 23 February 1943), was a British businessman.

Henry Grey, 10th Earl of Kent

Henry Grey, 10th Earl of Kent (24 November 1594 – 28 May 1651), known as Lord Ruthin from 1639 to 1643, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640 and succeeded to the title Earl of Kent in 1643.Grey was the eldest son of Rev. Anthony Grey, 9th Earl of Kent, and his wife Magdalene Purefoy, daughter of William Purefoy of Caldecote, Warwickshire. His father was rector of Aston Flamville, Leicestershire. Grey became Lord Ruthin on 21 November 1639. In April 1640 he was elected Member of Parliament for Leicestershire for the Short Parliament but did not sit in the Long Parliament.

On 4 June 1642 Grey was chosen by the parliament as first commissioner of the militia in Leicestershire. He inherited the title as Earl of Kent on the death of his father in 1643. On 16 August 1644 he became a commissioner of martial law and on 24 August be became Lord Lieutenant of Rutland. He became speaker of the House of Lords on 13 February 1645. He was resworn first commissioner of the great seal on 20 March 1645, and continued in office until 30 October 1646, when the seal was given to the speakers of the two houses. He was Custos Rotulorum of Bedfordshire and was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire by parliament on the Long Parliament on 2 July 1646 and held the position until his death.Grey became speaker of the House of Lords on 6 September 1647 and became a member of the committee of the navy and customs on 17 December 1647. He was one of the lords commissioners who took the four bills to the king at the Isle of Wight, and had to bring them back unsigned. In January 1648, he was selected to replace Earl of Essex as one of the seven peers on the Derby House Committee soon after it replaced the Committee of Both Kingdoms as Parliament's principal proto-executive body. On 17 March 1648, he was renominated chief commissioner of the great seal together with another lord and two commoners, but took no part in the trial or death of the king. He remained in office until the commons voted the abolition of the House of Lords on 6 February 1649, and two days after placed the seal in other hands.Grey married firstly Mary Courteen, daughter of Sir William Courteen and had a son Henry Grey who is believed to have died young. Mary died on 9 March 1644 and he married secondly on 1 August 1644 Annabel or Amabel Benn, daughter of Sir Anthony Benn and widow of Anthony Fane, the third surviving son of Francis Fane. They had two children: Anthony, who inherited the earldom, and Elizabeth, who married Banastre Maynard, 3rd Baron Maynard.Grey died aged 56 and a monument to his memory was erected by his widow in Flitton Church, Bedfordshire.

Henry Grey, 6th Earl of Kent

Henry Grey, 6th Earl of Kent (1541 – 31 January 1615) was an English peer.

He was a son of Henry Grey (1520–1545) and Margaret St. John and grandson of Henry Grey, 4th Earl of Kent.

He was a younger brother of Reginald Grey, 5th Earl of Kent and an older brother of Charles Grey, 7th Earl of Kent.

He was married to Mary Cotton, daughter of Sir George Cotton and Mary Onley. There were no known children from this marriage.

He served as Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire from 1586 to his death.

Henry Grey, 8th Earl of Kent

Henry Grey, 8th Earl of Kent (c. 1583 – 21 November 1639) was Earl of Kent from 1623 to his death.

He was born the only son of Charles Grey, 7th Earl of Kent and his wife Susan Cotton and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge.

On 16 November 1601, at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Henry married Elizabeth Talbot (1582 – 7 December 1651), a daughter of Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury and Mary Cavendish. There were no known children from this marriage. He was knighted in 1603.

He was elected Member of Parliament for Tavistock in 1601 and knight of the shire for Bedfordshire in 1614.

He served as Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire from 1621 to 1627 and again from 1629 to his death. From 1621 to 1623, Henry held the title jointly with his father Charles Grey, 7th Earl of Kent. From 1625 to 1627 and again from 1629 to his death, he held the title jointly with Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Cleveland.

He died childless and his primary title as Earl of Kent was inherited by his closest male-line relative, Anthony Grey, 9th Earl of Kent. Anthony was a second cousin of his father as they were both great-grandsons of George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent. His sister Susan Grey married Sir Michael Longueville; they were parents to Charles Longueville, 12th Baron Grey de Ruthyn.

John FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Upper Ossory

John FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Upper Ossory FRS DL (2 May 1745 – 13 February 1818), styled 'Lord Gowran' from 1751 to 1758, was an Irish peer and member of parliament.

Lord Edward Russell (1642–1714)

Lord Edward Russell (1643 – 30 June 1714) was an English politician, known as Hon. Edward Russell until 1694. He married Francis Lloyd, a widow, in 1688. They had no children.

Edward Russell was son of William Russell, 1st Duke of Bedford (1616–1700). Edward was educated privately and at the University of Padua. At the time of the 1st Duke's death, Edward was the oldest surviving son, but the dukedom passed instead to Edward's nephew, the young Wriothesley Russell, 2nd Duke of Bedford. This was because Wriothesley was the son of Edward's elder brother William Russell, Lord Russell.

Edward Russell represented Tavistock in Parliament from 13 February 1679 to 23 March 1683. Russell was appointed Custos Rotulorum of Caernarvonshire in 1689 at the Glorious Revolution, and was Treasurer of the Chamber from 1694 to 1702. He was briefly the Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire, Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire, Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex, and Custos Rotulorum of Middlesex from 1700 until 1701, when his nephew Wriothesley Russell, 2nd Duke of Bedford reached his majority and assumed those offices.

Oliver St John, 1st Earl of Bolingbroke

Oliver St John, 1st Earl of Bolingbroke (1580? – June/July 1646), known from 1618 until 1624 as 4th Baron St John of Bletso, was an English nobleman and politician.

Robert Bruce, 1st Earl of Ailesbury

Robert Bruce, 1st Earl of Ailesbury (later styled Aylesbury) and 2nd Earl of Elgin, PC, FRS (ca. March 1626 – 20 October 1685), was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1660 to 1663, when he inherited his father's title as Earl of Elgin.

Samuel Whitbread

Samuel Whitbread may refer to:

Samuel Whitbread (1720–1796), English brewer and Member of Parliament

Samuel Whitbread (1764–1815), his son, English politician

Samuel Charles Whitbread, his son, British Member of Parliament for Middlesex, 1820–1830

Samuel Whitbread (1830–1915), his son, British Member of Parliament for Bedford, 1852–1895

Samuel Howard Whitbread, his son, British Member of Parliament for Luton, 1892–1895, and Huntingdon, 1906–1910

Sam Whitbread, his grandson, former chairman of Whitbread & Co. and Lord Lieutenant of BedfordshireIt may also refer to:

Samuel Whitbread Academy, a secondary school in Shefford, Bedfordshire

Samuel Whitbread (Liberal politician)

Samuel Howard Whitbread (8 January 1858 – 29 July 1944) was a British Member of Parliament and a member of the Whitbread brewing family.

Thomas Bruce, 2nd Earl of Ailesbury

Thomas Bruce, 2nd Earl of Ailesbury (later styled Aylesbury) and 3rd Earl of Elgin (1656 – 16 December 1741) was an English politician and memoirist. He was the son of Robert Bruce, 2nd Earl of Elgin, and Lady Diana Grey. His maternal grandparents were Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford, and Lady Anne Cecil, daughter of William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter. His Memoirs, which were not published until long after his death, are a valuable source for English history in the last quarter of the seventeenth century.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.