Locus Award

The Locus Awards are an annual set of literary awards by the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus, a monthly based in Oakland, California, United States. The award winners are selected by polling magazine readers.

The awards are presented at an annual banquet. The publishers of winning works are honored with certificates, which is unique in the field.[1]

The Locus list was inaugurated in 1971 for publication year 1970 and was originally more of a list than an award, intended to predict the Hugo Awards, and then to provide suggestions and guidance for them.[1][2]

Winners

The following have won the most awards as of July 2011:[3]

* indicates that all wins came in editing categories.
** indicates that all wins came in art-related categories.

Categories

Inactive categories

There are several categories that no longer receive Locus Awards:[4]

  • Locus Award for Best Original Anthology (1972-1975)[5]
  • Locus Award for Best Reprint Anthology/Collection (1972-1975)[6]
  • Locus Award for Best Fanzine (1971-1977)[7]
  • Locus Award for Best Single Fanzine Issue (1971)[8]
  • Locus Award for Best Critic (1974-1977)[9]
  • Locus Award for Best Fan Writer (1971-1973)[10]
    • 1971: Harry Warner, Jr.
    • 1972: Charlie Brown
    • 1973: Terry Carr
  • Locus Award for Best Fan Critic (1971)[11]
    • 1971: Ted Pauls
  • Locus Award for Best Publisher - Hardcover (1975-1976)[12]
    • 1975: Science Fiction Book Club
    • 1976: Science Fiction Book Club
  • Locus Award for Best Publisher - Paperback (1975-1976)[13]
  • Locus Award for Best Paperback Cover Artist (1971-1973)[14]
    • 1971: Leo & Diane Dillon
    • 1972: Gene Szafran
    • 1973: Frank Kelly Freas
  • Locus Award for Best Magazine Artist (1972-1973)[15]
    • 1972: Frank Kelly Freas
    • 1973: Frank Kelly Freas
  • Locus Award for Best Fan Artist (1971-1975)[16]
    • 1971: Alicia Austin
    • 1972: Bill Rotsler
    • 1973: Bill Rotsler
    • 1974: Tim Kirk
    • 1975: Tim Kirk
  • Locus Award for Best Fan Cartoonist (1971)[17]
    • 1971: Bill Rotsler
  • Locus Award for Best Convention (1971)[18]
    • 1971: Noreascon

References

  1. ^ a b "About the Locus Awards" Archived 2013-08-28 at the Wayback Machine.. The Locus Index to SF Awards. Locus. Retrieved 12 April 2012.
  2. ^ Locus Science Fiction Award
    Locus nominations are presented annually to twenty publishers through a process of nomination by readers of Locus magazine. In 1971, when the first such list was compiled, it was not so much an award as an informal poll designed to predict the outcome of (and clarify the choices for) the Hugo awards.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-12-01. Retrieved 2008-12-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Locus Award Winners by Category Archived 2013-10-02 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  5. ^ Locus Awards for Best Original Anthology Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  6. ^ Locus Award for Best Reprint Anthology/Collection Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  7. ^ Locus Award for Best Fanzine Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  8. ^ Locus Award for Best Single Fanzine Issue Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  9. ^ Locus Award for Best Critic Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  10. ^ Locus Award for Best Fan Writer Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  11. ^ Locus Award for Best Fan Critic Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  12. ^ Locus Award for Best Publisher - Hardcover Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  13. ^ Locus Award for Best Publisher - Paperback Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  14. ^ Locus Award for Best Paperback Cover Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  15. ^ Locus Award for Best Magazine Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  16. ^ Locus Award for Best Fan Artist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  17. ^ Locus Award for Best Fan Cartoonist Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013
  18. ^ Locus Award for Best Convention Archived 2008-12-01 at the Wayback Machine. accessed 14 June 2013

External links

A Game of Thrones

A Game of Thrones is the first novel in A Song of Ice and Fire, a series of fantasy novels by American author George R. R. Martin. It was first published on August 1, 1996. The novel won the 1997 Locus Award and was nominated for both the 1997 Nebula Award and the 1997 World Fantasy Award. The novella Blood of the Dragon, comprising the Daenerys Targaryen chapters from the novel, won the 1997 Hugo Award for Best Novella. In January 2011 the novel became a New York Times Bestseller and reached #1 on the list in July 2011.In the novel, recounting events from various points of view, Martin introduces the plot-lines of the noble houses of Westeros, the Wall, and the Targaryens. The novel has inspired several spin-off works, including several games. It is also the namesake and basis for the first season of Game of Thrones, an HBO television series that premiered in April 2011. A March 2013 paperback TV tie-in re-edition was also titled Game of Thrones, excluding the indefinite article "A".

Ancillary Justice

Ancillary Justice is a science fiction novel by the American writer Ann Leckie, published in 2013. It is Leckie's debut novel and the first in her "Imperial Radch" space opera trilogy, followed by Ancillary Sword (2014) and Ancillary Mercy (2015). The novel follows Breq, the sole survivor of a starship destroyed by treachery and the vessel of that ship's artificial consciousness, as she seeks revenge against the ruler of her civilization.

Ancillary Justice received critical praise, won the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, BSFA Award, Arthur C. Clarke Award and Locus Award, and was nominated for several other science fiction awards. The cover art is by John Harris.

Another novel, Provenance (2017) and two short stories, "Night's Slow Poison" and "She Commands Me and I Obey", by the author are set in the same fictional universe.

Grotto of the Dancing Deer

"Grotto of the Dancing Deer" is one of Clifford D. Simak's later short stories. It won the 1980 Nebula Award for Best Short Story and the 1981 Hugo Award for Best Short Story and Locus Award for Best Short Story. It involves an archaeologist discovering an ancient painting and its painter, an immortal.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties

For the film based on the story, see How to Talk to Girls at Parties (film)"How to Talk to Girls at Parties" is a science fiction short story written in 2006 by Neil Gaiman.

It is about a couple of British 1970s teen-aged boys, Enn and Vic, who go to a party to meet girls, only to find that the girls are very different from the boys' expectations.

"How to Talk to Girls at Parties" was nominated for the 2007 Hugo Award for Best Short Story and won the Locus Award for Best Short Story. In 2009 it was the inspiration for a limited-edition poster with art by Camilla d'Errico, which was sold through Gaiman's merchandising site Neverwear. The poster had a limited run of 1200 numbered copies, and 10% of the proceeds were donated to the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, a favourite charity of Gaiman's.

Lavinia (novel)

Lavinia is a Locus Award-winning 2008 novel by American author Ursula K. Le Guin. It relates the life of Lavinia, a minor character in Virgil's epic poem the Aeneid.

List of awards and nominations received by Stephen King

Stephen King is an American author of contemporary horror, supernatural fiction, suspense, science fiction, crime fiction, and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies, many of which have been adapted into feature films, miniseries, television shows, and comic books. King has published 54 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman and six non-fiction books. He has written nearly 200 short stories, most of which have been collected in book collections.

King has received multiple awards and nominations for his work, including multiple Bram Stoker Awards, World Fantasy Awards, and British Fantasy Society Awards as well as the National Medal of Arts, Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and the O. Henry Award. He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his entire oeuvre, such as the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement (2004), the Canadian Booksellers Association Lifetime Achievement Award (2007), and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America (2007).

Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel

The Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel is a literary award given annually by Locus Magazine as part of their Locus Awards.

Locus Award for Best First Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best First Novel, awarded by the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year. The award for Best First Novel was first presented in 1981.

Locus Award for Best Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best Novel, awarded by Locus magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The award for Best Novel was presented from 1971 (when the awards began) to 1979. Since 1980, awards have been presented for Best SF Novel and Best Fantasy Novel.

Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best SF Novel, awarded by the Locus magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The award for Best Science Fiction Novel was first presented in 1980, and is among the awards still presented (as of 2016). Previously, there had simply been an award for Best Novel. A similar award for Best Fantasy Novel was also introduced in 1980.

Making Money

Making Money is a fantasy novel by British writer Terry Pratchett, part of his Discworld series, first published in the UK on 20 September 2007. It is the second novel featuring Moist von Lipwig, and involves the Ankh-Morpork mint and specifically the introduction of paper money to the city. The novel won the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel in 2008, and was nominated for the Nebula Award the same year.

Mirror Dance

Mirror Dance is a Hugo- and Locus-award-winning science fiction novel by Lois McMaster Bujold. Part of the Vorkosigan Saga, it was first published by Baen Books in March 1994, and is included in the 2002 omnibus Miles Errant.

N. K. Jemisin

Nora K. Jemisin (born September 19, 1972) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer and a psychologist. Her fiction explores a wide variety of themes, including cultural conflict and oppression. She has won several awards for her work, including the Locus Award. As of her August 2018 win, the three books of her Broken Earth series have made her the only author to have won the Hugo Award for Best Novel in three consecutive years.

In 2009 and 2010, Jemisin's short story "Non-Zero Probabilities" was a finalist for the Nebula and Hugo Best Short Story Awards, respectively. Her debut novel, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, the first volume in her Inheritance Trilogy, was nominated for the 2010 Nebula Award, and short-listed for the James Tiptree Jr. Award. In 2011, it was nominated for the Hugo Award, World Fantasy Award, and Locus Award, winning the 2011 Locus Award for Best First Novel. The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms also won the Sense of Gender Awards in 2011. It was followed by two further novels in the same trilogy – The Broken Kingdoms in 2010 and The Kingdom of Gods in 2011.

In 2016, Jemisin's novel The Fifth Season won the Hugo Award for Best Novel, making her the first African-American writer to win a Hugo award in that category. Its sequels, The Obelisk Gate and The Stone Sky, won the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

Prentice Alvin

Prentice Alvin (1989) is an alternate history/fantasy novel by American writer Orson Scott Card. It is the third book in Card's The Tales of Alvin Maker series and is about Alvin Miller, the Seventh son of a seventh son. Prentice Alvin won the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel in 1990, was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1989, and the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1990.

Red Prophet

Red Prophet (1988) is an alternate history/fantasy novel by American writer Orson Scott Card. It is the second book in Card's The Tales of Alvin Maker series and is about Alvin Miller, the seventh son of a seventh son. Red Prophet won the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel in 1989, was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1988, and the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1989.

Ringworld

Ringworld is a 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe and considered a classic of science fiction literature. Niven later added four sequels and four prequels. (The Fleet of Worlds series, co-written with Edward M. Lerner, provides the four prequels, as well as Fate of Worlds, the final sequel.) These books tie into numerous other books set in Known Space. Ringworld won the Nebula Award in 1970, as well as both the Hugo Award and Locus Award in 1971.

Stephen King bibliography

The following is a complete list of books published by Stephen King, an American author of contemporary horror, suspense, science fiction, and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies, and many of them have been adapted into feature films, television movies and comic books. King has published 59 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman, and five non-fiction books. He has written over 200 short stories, most of which have been compiled in book collections. Many of his stories are set in his home state of Maine.

Tales from Earthsea

Tales from Earthsea is a collection of fantasy stories and essays by American author Ursula K. Le Guin, published by Harcourt in 2001. It accompanies five novels (1968 to 2001) set in the fictional archipelago Earthsea.Tales from Earthsea won the annual Endeavour Award, for the best book by a writer from the Pacific Northwest, and Locus Award, Best Collection, for speculative fiction collections.

Two of the five collected stories were previously published, "Darkrose and Diamond" (1999) and "Dragonfly" (1998), and both had been nominated for annual awards.

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