Locus (magazine)

Locus: The Magazine of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field, is an American magazine published monthly in Oakland, California. It is the news organ and trade journal for the English language science fiction and fantasy fields.[1] It also publishes comprehensive listings of all new books published in the genres.[2] The magazine also presents the annual Locus Awards. Locus Online was launched in April 1997, as a semi-autonomous web version of Locus Magazine.[3]

Locus
EditorLiza Groen Trombi
FrequencyMonthly
Year founded1968
CountryUnited States
Based inOakland, California
LanguageEnglish
Websitelocusmag.com
ISSN0047-4959

History

Charles N. Brown, Ed Meskys, and Dave Vanderwerf founded Locus in 1968 as a news fanzine to promote the (ultimately successful) bid to host the 1971 World Science Fiction Convention in Boston, Massachusetts. Originally intended to run only until the site-selection vote was taken at St. Louiscon, the 1969 Worldcon in St. Louis, Missouri, Brown decided to continue publishing Locus as a mimeographed general science fiction and fantasy newszine. Locus succeeded the monthly newszine Science Fiction Times (formerly Fantasy Times, founded 1941), when SFT ceased publication in 1970. Brown directed Locus as publisher and editor-in-chief for more than 40 years, from 1968 until his death at age 72 in July 2009.

Locus announced that the magazine would continue operations, with executive editor Liza Groen Trombi succeeding Brown as editor-in-chief.[4] The magazine and the Charles N. Brown Collection are now owned by the Locus Science Fiction Foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, nonprofit corporation.[5]

Locus publishes:

  • News about the science fiction, fantasy, and horror publishing field—stories about publishers, awards, and conferences—including "The Data File", "People & Publishing" (rights sold, books sold, books resold, books delivered, publishing news, promotions; people news and photos about vacations, weddings, and births), and obituaries
  • Interviews with well-known and up-and-coming writers (and sometimes editors and artists), usually two per issue
  • Reviews of new and forthcoming books, usually 20–25 per issue, by notable SF critics including Gary K. Wolfe, Faren Miller, Nick Gevers, Jonathan Strahan, Adrienne Martini, Russell Letson, Gwenda Bond, Stefan Dziemanowicz, Carolyn Cushman, Karen Burnham, and Richard Lupoff plus short fiction reviews by Gardner Dozois and Rich Horton[6][7]
  • A bimonthly commentary column by Cory Doctorow
  • Reports from around the world about the SF scenes in various countries
  • Listings of US and UK books and magazines published (monthly), bestsellers (monthly), and forthcoming books (every three months)
  • Convention reports, with many photos
  • Annual year-in-review coverage, with extensive recommended reading lists and the annual Locus Poll and Survey
  • Letters and classified ads

Locus has won many Hugo Awards, first the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine, and then in 1984 when the new category "Best Semiprozine" was established. As of 2012, Locus won the award for "Best Fanzine" eight times and for "Best Semiprozine" 22 times during the category's first 29 years. In 2012 "Best Semiprozine" was redefined to exclude all small, independent genre magazines as "professional publications" if they had either "(1) provided at least a quarter the income of any one person or, (2) was owned or published by any entity which provided at least a quarter the income of any of its staff and/or owner."; this included Locus.[8] There is no longer a "Professional Magazine" Hugo Award; that original category was replaced in 1973 by the current "Best Editor."

Authors Arthur C. Clarke, Connie Willis, Robert A. Heinlein, and Terry Pratchett, and The New York Times, have all cited the value of Locus to the field.

Locus Press has published several books, including Fantasy: The Very Best of 2005 and Science Fiction: The Very Best of 2005.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Charles N. Brown: Sci-Fi enthusiast and founder of 'Locus' magazine". The Independent. London, England. 2 September 2009. Obituaries. Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  2. ^ "Locus Online: The Website of The Magazine of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Field". Locus Online. Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  3. ^ "Locus Online: About the Website". Locus Online. Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  4. ^ "Charles N. Brown, 1937-2009". Locus Online. 13 July 2009. Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  5. ^ "Working to Promote and Preserve Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror". Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  6. ^ "Staff". Locus Online. Retrieved 2017-09-18.
  7. ^ "Index to Locus Magazine". Locus Online. Retrieved 2017-09-18.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2017-04-05.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

Ann Leckie

Ann Leckie (born 1966) is an American author and editor of science fiction and fantasy. Her 2013 debut novel Ancillary Justice won the 2014 Hugo Award for Best Novel as well as the Nebula Award, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the BSFA Award. The sequels Ancillary Sword and Ancillary Mercy each won the Locus Award and were nominated for the Nebula Award.

Asimov's Science Fiction

Asimov's Science Fiction (ISSN 1065-2698) is an American science fiction magazine which publishes science fiction and fantasy named after science fiction author Isaac Asimov. It is currently published by Penny Publications. From January 2017, the publication frequency is bimonthly (six issues per year).Circulation in 2012 was 22,593, as reported in the annual Locus magazine survey.

Charles N. Brown

Charles Nikki Brown (June 24, 1937 – July 12, 2009) was an American publishing editor, the co-founder and editor of Locus, the long-running news and reviews magazine covering the genres of science fiction and fantasy literature. Brown was born on June 24, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York. He attended City College until 1956, when he joined the military at age 18; Brown served in the United States Navy for three years. Following his discharge from navy service, he went to work as a nuclear engineer but later on changed careers and entered the publishing field; Brown became a full-time science fiction editor with Locus in 1975.Along with Ed Meskys and Dave Vanderwerf, Charles N. Brown founded Locus in 1968 as a news fanzine to promote a bid to host the 1971 World Science Fiction Convention in Boston. Originally intended to run only until the site-selection vote was taken at St. Louiscon, the 1969 Worldcon in St. Louis, Missouri, Brown decided to continue publishing Locus as a general science fiction and fantasy news fanzine. It quickly began to fill the void left when the decades-old news fanzine Science Fiction Times (formerly Fantasy Times, founded 1941) ceased publication in 1970 during the same time period. Locus gradually evolved into the field's professional trade journal and remains so today. In 1970 it was first nominated in the category of Hugo Award for Best Fanzine. The following year at the 29th Worldcon, the first Noreascon that Locus was founded to promote and support, Brown's news fanzine won its first of a record 29 Hugo Awards (as of 2008).Brown died peacefully in his sleep at the age of 72. He previously had been announced as one of the guests of honor at Renovation, the 69th World Science Fiction Convention in Reno, Nevada. In accordance with established Worldcon tradition, he was retained as a guest of honor in memory of his longtime contributions to the science fiction field.

Locus Award

The Locus Awards are an annual set of literary awards by the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus, a monthly based in Oakland, California, United States. The award winners are selected by polling magazine readers.

The awards are presented at an annual banquet. The publishers of winning works are honored with certificates, which is unique in the field.The Locus list was inaugurated in 1971 for publication year 1970 and was originally more of a list than an award, intended to predict the Hugo Awards, and then to provide suggestions and guidance for them.

Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel

The Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel is a literary award given annually by Locus Magazine as part of their Locus Awards.

Locus Award for Best First Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best First Novel, awarded by the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year. The award for Best First Novel was first presented in 1981.

Locus Award for Best Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best Novel, awarded by Locus magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The award for Best Novel was presented from 1971 (when the awards began) to 1979. Since 1980, awards have been presented for Best SF Novel and Best Fantasy Novel.

Locus Award for Best Novelette

The Locus Award for Best Novelette is one of a series of Locus Awards given annually by Locus Magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The first award in this category was presented in 1975.

Locus Award for Best Novella

The Locus Award for Best Novella is one of a series of Locus Awards given out each year by Locus Magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The first award in this category was presented in 1973.

Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best SF Novel, awarded by the Locus magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The award for Best Science Fiction Novel was first presented in 1980, and is among the awards still presented (as of 2016). Previously, there had simply been an award for Best Novel. A similar award for Best Fantasy Novel was also introduced in 1980.

Locus Award for Best Short Story

The Locus Award for Best Short Story is one of a series of Locus Awards given every year by Locus Magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The first award in this category was presented in 1971.

Locus Award for Best Young Adult Book

Winners of the Locus Award for Best Young Adult Book, awarded by the Locus magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The award for Best Young Adult Book was first presented in 2003, and is among the awards still presented.

Locus Online

Locus Online (founded 1997) is the online component of Locus Magazine. It publishes news briefs related to the science fiction, fantasy and horror publishing world, along with original reviews and feature articles, and excerpts of articles that appeared in the print edition. Information for Locus Online is compiled and edited by Mark R. Kelly. In 2002, Locus Online won the first Hugo Award for Best Web Site. It was nominated again in 2005.In January 2016, longtome short-fiction reviewer Lois Tilton announced her resignation. She wrote, "Without consulting or informing me, they had begun deleting material they considered negative from my reviews. To me, this is censorship and completely unacceptable."

Morlock Night

Morlock Night is a science fiction novel by American writer K. W. Jeter. It was published in 1979. In a letter to

Locus Magazine in April 1987, Jeter coined the word "steampunk" to describe it and other novels by James Blaylock and Tim Powers.

Morlock Night uses the ideas of H. G. Wells in which the Morlocks of The Time Machine themselves use the device to travel back into the past and menace Victorian London. King Arthur and Merlin appear as England's saviors.

Nancy Kress

Nancy Anne Kress (born January 20, 1948) is an American science fiction writer. She began writing in 1976 but has achieved her greatest notice since the publication of her Hugo and Nebula-winning 1991 novella Beggars in Spain, which she later expanded into a novel with the same title. She has also won the Nebula Award for Best Novella in 2013 for After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall, and in 2015 for Yesterday's Kin.

In addition to her novels, Kress has written numerous short stories and is a regular columnist for Writer's Digest. She is a regular at Clarion writing workshops. During the Winter of 2008/09, Nancy Kress was the Picador Guest Professor for Literature at the University of Leipzig's Institute for American Studies in Leipzig, Germany.

Sam J. Miller

Sam J. Miller is a science fiction, fantasy and horror short fiction author. His stories have appeared in publications such as Clarkesworld, Asimov's Science Fiction, and Lightspeed, along with over fifteen "year's best" story collections. A finalist for multiple Nebula Awards along with the World Fantasy and Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Awards, he won the 2013 Shirley Jackson Award for his short story "57 Reasons for the Slate Quarry Suicides."

The Cherryh Odyssey

The Cherryh Odyssey is a 2004 collection of essays by various academics, critics and authors about American Hugo Award-winning science fiction and fantasy author, C. J. Cherryh. It was edited by author and academic, Edward Carmien, and was published by Borgo Press, an imprint of Wildside Press as part of its Author Study series. Locus Magazine put the book on its "2004 Recommended Reading List", and Carmien received a nomination for the 2005 Locus Award for Best Non-fiction book for The Cherryh Odyssey.The book's cover was painted by Cherryh's brother, David Cherry. He had originally intended it to be used for the cover of Cherryh's 1986 collection of short fiction, Visible Light, but it was "not warmly received by the publisher".

The Internet Review of Science Fiction

The Internet Review of Science Fiction was an American webzine devoted to science fiction criticism. It featured critical articles as well as reviews of short fiction and novels.

Tim Pratt

Tim Pratt (born December 12, 1976) is a science fiction and fantasy writer and poet. He grew up in the vicinity of Dudley, North Carolina, and attended Appalachian State University, where he earned a Bachelor's in English. In 1999 he attended the Clarion East Writing Workshop. He moved to Santa Cruz, California in 2000, and currently resides in Oakland with his wife Heather Shaw and son River. He currently works as a senior editor at Locus Magazine.

Pratt's work has appeared in a number of markets, including Asimov's Science Fiction, Realms of Fantasy, Orson Scott Card's InterGalactic Medicine Show, and Strange Horizons. His story "Little Gods" (online) (2002) was nominated for Nebula Award for the Best Short Story. His story "Hart & Boot," first published in Polyphony 4, was reprinted in Best American Short Stories: 2005. His "Impossible Dreams" (Asimov's July 2006) won the Hugo Award in the Best Short Story category. Collection Hart & Boot & Other Stories was a World Fantasy Award finalist in 2008.

He has also had stories and poems published in various other markets and Year's Best collections.

In 2009, he donated his archive to the department of Rare Books and Special Collections at Northern Illinois University.

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