Live action

Live action is a form of cinematography or videography that uses photography instead of animation. Some works combine live action with animation. Live-action is used to define film, video games or similar visual media.[1] Photorealistic animation, particularly modern computer animation, is sometimes erroneously described as “live-action” as in the case of some media reports about Disney's 2019 remake of The Lion King.[2][3] According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, live action "[involves] real people or animals, not models, or images that are drawn, or produced by computer".[4]

Overview

As the normal process of making visual media involves live action, the term itself is usually superfluous. However, it makes an important distinction in situations in which one might normally expect animation, as in a Pixar film, a video game, or when the work is adapted from an animated cartoon, such as Scooby-Doo, The Flintstones, 101 Dalmatians films, or The Tick television program.

The phrase "live action" also occurs within an animation context to refer to non-animated characters: in a live-action/animated film such as Space Jam, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, or Mary Poppins in which humans and cartoons co-exist. In this case the "live-action" characters are the "real" actors, such as Michael Jordan, Bob Hoskins and Julie Andrews, as opposed to the animated "actors", such as Roger Rabbit himself.

As use of computer-generated imagery (CGI) in films has become a major trend, some critics, such as Mark Langer, have discussed the relationship and overlap between live action and animation. New films that use computer-generated special effects can not be compared to live action films using cartoon characters because of the perceived realism of both styles combined.[5]

Live action vs. animation

In producing a movie, both live action and animation present their own pros and cons. Unlike animation, live action involves the photography of actors and actresses, as well as sets and props making the movie seem personal and as close to reality as possible. The only drawback being one's budget. On the other hand, animation works well in conveying abstract ideas and it generally takes longer to produce.[6]

Disney's live action

Disney's first live action movie was Treasure Island in 1950. Both Mary Poppins (1964) and Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) are examples of Disney's live action and animation combination movies. After witnessing the success of Marvel and Pixar, The Walt Disney Company decided to produce re-makes of earlier subjects, such as The Jungle Book in 1994 (and in 2016, another re-make was made, this time combining live action with realistic computer animation). Other successful films, such as 101 Dalmatians and Alice in Wonderland, as well as their respected sequels would again become live action movies, followed by Sleeping Beauty (narrated from Maleficent's point of view this time), Cinderella, and Beauty and the Beast.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Merriam Webster Online Dictionary". Merriam-Webster.
  2. ^ "Get It Right: Disney Is Doing An Animated—Not Live-Action—Remake of 'The Lion King'". Cartoon Brew. 2016-09-28. Retrieved 2018-11-23.
  3. ^ "No, Disney Isn't Making a 'Live-Action' Lion King Movie - Mandatory". Mandatory. 2016-09-28. Retrieved 2018-11-23.
  4. ^ "live action Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary". dictionary.cambridge.org. Retrieved 2017-11-14.
  5. ^ McMahan, Alison (2014-08-21). "Hollywood's Transition to CGI". The Films of Tim Burton: Animating Live Action in Contemporary Hollywood. Bloomsbury Publishing USA. ISBN 013210475X. Retrieved 2014-12-19.
  6. ^ "Animation vs Live Action: Which Makes the Best Corporate Video?". Retrieved 2018-03-23.
  7. ^ "Here Are All of Disney's Upcoming Live-Action Remakes". Collider. 2017-09-14. Retrieved 2017-11-14.
1990 in film

The year 1990 in film involved many significant events as shown below. Universal Pictures celebrated its 75th anniversary in 1990.

1994 in film

This is a list of films released in 1994. The top worldwide grosser was The Lion King, becoming the highest-grossing Walt Disney Feature Animation film of all-time, although it was slightly overtaken at the North American domestic box office by Forrest Gump, which won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer celebrated its 70th Anniversary in 1994.

1998 in film

The year 1998 in film involved many significant films including; Shakespeare in Love (which won the Academy Award for Best Picture), Saving Private Ryan, American History X, The Truman Show, Primary Colors, Rushmore, Rush Hour, There's Something About Mary, The Big Lebowski, and Terrence Malick's directorial return in The Thin Red Line. Animated releases included Antz, A Bug's Life, Mulan, The Prince of Egypt and The Rugrats Movie.

Warner Bros. Pictures celebrated its 75th anniversary in 1998.

1999 in film

The year 1999 in film included Stanley Kubrick's final film Eyes Wide Shut, Pedro Almodóvar's first Oscar-winning film All About My Mother, the science-fiction hit The Matrix, the Deep Canvas-pioneering Disney animated feature Tarzan and Best Picture-winner American Beauty and the well-received The Green Mile, as well as the animated works The Iron Giant, Toy Story 2, Stuart Little and South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut. Other noteworthy releases included Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman's breakout film Being John Malkovich and M. Night Shyamalan's breakout film The Sixth Sense, the controversial Fight Club and Paul Thomas Anderson's Magnolia. The year also featured George Lucas' top-grossing Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace.

Columbia Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer celebrated their 75th anniversaries in 1999.

2000 in film

The year 2000 in film involved some significant events.

The top grosser worldwide was Mission: Impossible 2. Domestically in North America, Gladiator won the Academy Awards for Best Picture and Best Actor (Russell Crowe).Dinosaur was the most expensive film of 2000 and a box-office success.

2001 in film

The year 2001 in film involved some significant events, including the first of the Harry Potter series, the first of The Fast and the Furious franchise, the first of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, the first of the Ocean's Trilogy, and the first of the Shrek franchise. Significant non-English language films released included Monsoon Wedding and Amélie.

2002 in film

The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. It included blockbuster films like Spider-Man, Die Another Day, and Signs. Major releases of sequels took place like The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones, Men in Black II, Analyze That, Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams, Stuart Little 2 and Blade II. The year also saw the 3rd installment Austin Powers in Goldmember and the 10th installment Star Trek: Nemesis. Paramount Pictures celebrated its 90th anniversary in 2002

2003 in film

The year 2003 in film involved some significant events.

2004 in film

The year 2004 in film involved some significant events. Major releases of sequels took place. It included blockbuster films like Troy, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, The Bourne Supremacy, Van Helsing, The Passion of the Christ, Resident Evil: Apocalypse, Thunderbirds, Meet the Fockers, Harold & Kumar, The Day After Tomorrow, Anchorman, Saw, Blade: Trinity, Spider-Man 2, Alien vs. Predator, The Incredibles, Kill Bill: Volume 2, Fahrenheit 9/11, I, Robot, Ocean's Twelve and Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed.

2005 in film

The year 2005 saw the release of many significant and successful films. The highest-grossing films of this year are listed below, as well as a complete list of every film released this year.

Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film

Live Action Short Film is a category at the Academy Awards, existing under various names as a single category since 1957.

From 1936 until 1956 there were two separate awards, "Best Short Subject, One-reel" and "Best Short Subject, Two-reel", referring to the running time of the short: a standard reel of film is 1000 feet, or about 11 minutes of run time. A third category "Best Short Subject, color" was used only for 1936 and 1937. From the initiation of short subject awards for 1932 until 1935 the terms were "Best Short Subject, comedy" and "Best Short Subject, novelty".

These categories were merged starting with the 1957 awards, under the name "Short Subjects, Live Action Subjects", which was used until 1970. For the next three years after that, it was known as "Short Subjects, Live Action Films". The current name for the Academy Award for Live Action Short Film was introduced in 1974.

Aladdin (2019 film)

Aladdin is an upcoming American musical fantasy film directed by Guy Ritchie, from the screenplay co-written with John August, and produced by Walt Disney Pictures. It is a live action remake of Disney's 1992 animated film of the same name, which is in turn based on the eponymous Arabic folktale from One Thousand and One Nights. The film stars Mena Massoud in the titular role, alongside Will Smith, Naomi Scott, Marwan Kenzari, Navid Negahban, Nasim Pedrad, and Billy Magnussen.

In October 2016, Disney announced Ritchie would direct a live-action Aladdin remake. Smith was the first member of the cast to join, signing on to portray Genie in July 2017, and later that month Massoud and Scott were confirmed for the two lead roles. Principal photography began that September at Longcross Studios in Surrey, England, also filming in the Wadi Rum Desert in Jordan, and lasted until January 2018.

Aladdin is scheduled to be theatrically released in the United States on May 24, 2019.

Dragon Ball

Dragon Ball (Japanese: ドラゴンボール, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru), sometimes styled as Dragonball, is a Japanese media franchise created by Akira Toriyama in 1984. The initial manga, written and illustrated by Toriyama, was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1984 to 1995, with the 519 individual chapters collected into 42 tankōbon volumes by its publisher Shueisha. Dragon Ball was initially inspired by the classical Chinese novel Journey to the West, as well as Hong Kong martial arts films. The series follows the adventures of the protagonist, Son Goku, from his childhood through adulthood as he trains in martial arts and explores the world in search of the seven orbs known as the Dragon Balls, which summon a wish-granting dragon when gathered. Along his journey, Goku makes several friends and battles a wide variety of villains, many of whom also seek the Dragon Balls.

Toriyama's manga was adapted and divided into two anime series produced by Toei Animation: Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z, which together were broadcast in Japan from 1986 to 1996. Additionally, the studio has developed 20 animated feature films and three television specials, as well as two anime sequel series titled Dragon Ball GT (1996–1997) and Dragon Ball Super (2015–2018). From 2009 to 2015, a revised version of Dragon Ball Z aired in Japan under the title Dragon Ball Kai, as a recut that follows the manga's story more faithfully by removing most of the material featured exclusively in the anime. Several companies have developed various types of merchandising based on the series leading to a large media franchise that includes films, both animated and live-action, collectible trading card games, numerous action figures, along with several collections of soundtracks and a large number of video games. Dragon Ball is one of the top twenty highest-grossing media franchises of all time, having generated more than $20 billion in total franchise revenue as of 2018.Since its release, Dragon Ball has become one of the most successful manga and anime series of all time, with the manga sold in over 40 countries and the anime broadcast in more than 80 countries. The manga's 42 collected tankōbon volumes have sold over 160 million copies in Japan, and are estimated to have sold more 250–300 million copies worldwide, making it the second best-selling manga series in history. Reviewers have praised the art, characterization, and humour of the story. It is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential manga series ever made, with many manga artists citing Dragon Ball as a source of inspiration for their own now popular works. The anime, particularly Dragon Ball Z, is also highly popular across the world and is considered one of the most influential in boosting the popularity of Japanese animation in Western culture. It has had a considerable impact on global popular culture, referenced by and inspiring numerous artists, athletes, celebrities, filmmakers, musicians and writers across the world.

List of Walt Disney Pictures films

This is a list of films produced by and released under the Walt Disney Pictures banner (known as that since 1983, with Never Cry Wolf as its first release) and films released before that under the former name of the parent company, Walt Disney Productions (1929–1983). Most films listed here were distributed theatrically in the United States by the company's distribution division, Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures (formerly known as Buena Vista Distribution Company [1953–1987] and Buena Vista Pictures Distribution [1987–2007]). The Disney features produced before Peter Pan (1953) were originally distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, and are now distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. Some films produced by Walt Disney Pictures are also set to be released under the parent company's streaming service, Disney+.This list is organized by release date and includes live-action feature films (including theatrical and streaming releases), animated feature films (including films developed and produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios), and documentary films (including titles from the True-Life Adventures series and films produced by the Disneynature label). For an exclusive list of animated films released by Walt Disney Pictures and its previous entities see List of Disney theatrical animated features.

This list is only for films released under the main Disney banner. The list does not include films produced or released by other existing, defunct or divested labels or subsidiaries owned by Walt Disney Studios (i.e. Marvel StudiosMVL, LucasfilmLFL, 20th Century Fox, Fox Searchlight Pictures, National Geographic Documentary Films, Touchstone Pictures, Hollywood Pictures, Miramax Films, Dimension Films, ESPN Films etc.; unless they are credited as co-production partners) nor any direct-to-video releases, TV films, theatrical re-releases, or films originally released by other non-Disney studios.

List of films with live action and animation

This is a list of films with live action and animation, films that combine live action and animated elements, typically interacting.

List of programs broadcast by Nickelodeon

This is a list of television programs broadcast by Nickelodeon in the United States. The channel was launched on December 1, 1977 (as Pinwheel) and on April 1, 1979 (as Nickelodeon), and airs a mix of animated and live-action shows.

Live action role-playing game

A live action role-playing game (LARP) is a form of role-playing game where the participants physically portray their characters. The players pursue goals within a fictional setting represented by the real world while interacting with each other in character. The outcome of player actions may be mediated by game rules or determined by consensus among players. Event arrangers called gamemasters decide the setting and rules to be used and facilitate play.

The first LARPs were run in the late 1970s, inspired by tabletop role-playing games and genre fiction. The activity spread internationally during the 1980s and has diversified into a wide variety of styles. Play may be very game-like or may be more concerned with dramatic or artistic expression. Events can also be designed to achieve educational or political goals. The fictional genres used vary greatly, from realistic modern or historical settings to fantastic or futuristic eras. Production values are sometimes minimal, but can involve elaborate venues and costumes. LARPs range in size from small private events lasting a few hours to large public events with thousands of players lasting for days.

Neon Genesis Evangelion

Neon Genesis Evangelion (Japanese: 新世紀エヴァンゲリオン, Hepburn: Shinseiki Evangerion, literally "The Gospel of the New Century") is a Japanese mecha anime television series produced by Gainax and Tatsunoko Production, directed by Hideaki Anno and broadcast on TV Tokyo from October 1995 to March 1996. The cast included Megumi Ogata as Shinji Ikari, Megumi Hayashibara as Rei Ayanami, and Yūko Miyamura as Asuka Langley Soryu. The music was composed by Shirō Sagisu.

Evangelion is set fifteen years after a worldwide cataclysm, particularly in the futuristic fortified city of Tokyo-3. The protagonist is Shinji, a teenage boy who was recruited by his father to the shadowy organization Nerv to pilot a giant bio-machine mecha called an "Evangelion" into combat with alien beings called "Angels". The series explores the experiences and emotions of Evangelion pilots and members of Nerv as they try to prevent any and all of the Angels from causing another cataclysm, and as they deal with the quest of finding out the real truth behind events and organizational moves. The series features imagery derived from Kabbalah, Christianity, and Judaism.

Neon Genesis Evangelion received critical acclaim, and garnered controversy. Particularly controversial were the last two episodes of the show, leading the team behind the series to produce the original intended version of the ending in the 1997 film The End of Evangelion. Regarded as a deconstruction of the mecha genre, the original TV series led to a rebirth of the anime industry and has become a cultural icon. Film, manga, home video, and other products in the Evangelion franchise have achieved record sales in Japanese markets and strong sales in overseas markets, with related goods selling over ¥150 billion by 2007 and Evangelion pachinko machines selling ¥700 billion by 2015.

Star Wars

Star Wars is an American epic space-opera media franchise created by George Lucas. The franchise began with the eponymous 1977 film and quickly became a worldwide pop-culture phenomenon.

The first film, later subtitled Episode IV – A New Hope, was followed by two sequels, Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Episode VI – Return of the Jedi (1983), collectively referred to as the original trilogy. A subsequent prequel trilogy, consisting of Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999), Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) and Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005), completed what Lucas later called the "tragedy of Darth Vader". Finally, a sequel trilogy began with Episode VII – The Force Awakens (2015), continued with Episode VIII – The Last Jedi (2017), and will conclude with Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker (2019). The first eight films were nominated for Academy Awards (with wins going to the first two released) and were commercially successful. Together with the theatrical anthology films Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) and Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018), the films combined box office revenue equates to over US$9 billion, and is currently the second-highest-grossing film franchise.The film series expanded into other media, including television series, video games, novels, comic books, theme park attractions and themed areas, resulting in an all encompassing fictional universe. Star Wars holds a Guinness World Records title for the "Most successful film merchandising franchise". In 2018, the total value of the Star Wars franchise was estimated at US$65 billion, and it is currently the fifth-highest-grossing media franchise of all-time.

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