Litae

Litae /ˈlaɪˌtiː/ (Greek: Λιταί meaning 'Prayers') are personifications in Greek mythology.

They appear in Homer's Iliad in Book 9 as the lame and wrinkled daughters of Zeus (no mother named and no number given) who follow after Zeus' exiled daughter Até ('Folly') as healers but who cannot keep up with the fast-running Até. They bring great advantage to those who venerate them; but if someone dishonors them, then they go to Zeus and ask that Até be sent against that person.[1]

This is an obvious allegory on the supposed power of prayer to mitigate the misfortunes into which one's folly has led one.

References

  1. ^ Homer, Iliad, 9. 502 ff; see also Quintus Smyrnaeus, Fall of Troy, 10. 302
Aceso

Aceso (Greek: Ἀκεσώ) was the Greek goddess of the healing process.

Achlys

Achlys (Ancient Greek: Ἀχλύς "mist" or "darkness") is an ancient Greek goddess, symbol mist of death; in Greek mythology, according to some ancient cosmogonies, is the eternal Night before Chaos. If Achlys was a daughter of Nyx (Night) then she may have been numbered amongst the Keres.

Aglaea

Aglaea () or Aglaïa (; Greek: Ἀγλαΐα "splendor, brilliant, shining one") is the name of several figures in Greek mythology, the best known of which is one of the three Charites or Graces.

Apollonis

Apollonis (; Ancient Greek: Ἀπoλλωνίς means "of Apollo") was one of the three younger Mousai Apollonides (Muses) in Greek mythology and daughters of Apollo who were worshipped in Delphi where the Temple of Apollo and the Oracle were located. The three sisters, Cephisso, Apollonis, and Borysthenis, are also known as Nētē, Mesē, and Hypatē where their names are synonymous with those of the lowest, middle, and highest chords of a lyre, further characterizing the Muses as the daughters of Apollo.

Atë

Atë, Até or Aite ( or UK: ; Ancient Greek: ἄτη) is the Greek goddess of mischief, delusion, ruin, and folly. Até also refers to the action performed by a hero, usually because of hubris, that often leads to their death or downfall. Mythology personifies Atë as the daughter either of Zeus or of Eris.

Dolos (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Dolos or Dolus (Ancient Greek: Δόλος "Deception") is the spirit of trickery and guile. He is also a master at cunning deception, craftiness, and treachery. He was the son of Gaia (Earth) and Aether (Hyginus, Fabulae Theogony 3) or Erebus and Nyx (Cicero, De Natura Deorum 3.17).Dolos is an apprentice of the Titan Prometheus and a companion of the Pseudologi (Lies). His female counterpart is Apate, who is the goddess of fraud and deception. His Roman equivalent is Mendacius. There are even some stories of Dolos tricking gods into lies.

Epimetheus

In Greek mythology, Epimetheus (; Greek: Ἐπιμηθεύς, which might mean "hindsight", literally "afterthinker") was the brother of Prometheus (traditionally interpreted as "foresight", literally "fore-thinker"), a pair of Titans who "acted as representatives of mankind" (Kerenyi 1951, p 207). They were the sons of Iapetus, who in other contexts was the father of Atlas. While Prometheus is characterized as ingenious and clever, Epimetheus is depicted as foolish.

Erebus

In Greek mythology, Erebus , also Erebos (Ancient Greek: Ἔρεβος, Érebos, "deep darkness, shadow" or "covered"), was often conceived as a primordial deity, representing the personification of darkness; for instance, Hesiod's Theogony identifies him as one of the first five beings in existence, born of Chaos.

Green manakin

The green Manakin (Cryptopipo holochlora) is a species of bird in the Pipridae family. It occurs in humid forest in lowlands and foothills. The distribution is disjunct, with one population in the western Amazon Basin and adjacent east Andean foothills in south-eastern Colombia, eastern Ecuador and eastern Peru, and another population in the humid Chocó in eastern Panama, western Colombia and north-western Ecuador. It has been suggested that the latter population may be a separate species, the Lita Manakin (Cryptopipo litae). As suggested by its common name both the male and the female of the green manakin are overall green. It remains fairly common locally (but is easily overlooked), and is consequently considered to be of least concern by BirdLife International and IUCN.

Hemera

In Greek mythology Hemera (; Ancient Greek: Ἡμέρα [hɛːméra] "Day") was the personification of day and one of the Greek primordial deities. She is the goddess of the daytime and, according to Hesiod, the daughter of Erebus and Nyx (the goddess of night).

Limos

Limos (Greek: Λιμός; "starvation"), Roman Fames , was the goddess of starvation in ancient Greek religion. She was opposed by Demeter, goddess of grain and the harvest with whom Ovid wrote Limos could never meet, and Plutus, the god of wealth and the bounty of rich harvests.

Lita woodpecker

The Lita woodpecker (Piculus litae) is a species of bird in the family Picidae.

It is found in western Colombia and northwestern Ecuador.

Litai (disambiguation)

Litai usually refers to Lithuanian litas (plural litai).

Litai may also refer to:

Litae, daughters of Zeus in Greek mythology

Litai, Shandong, a town in Yanggu County, Shandong, China

Litai Township, a township in Xianyang, Shaanxi, China

Megaera

Megaera (; Ancient Greek: Μέγαιρα, English translation: "the jealous one") is one of the Erinyes, Eumenides or "Furies" in Greek mythology. Lamprière's Classical Dictionary states "According to the most received opinions, they were three in number, Tisiphone, "Megaera ... daughter of Nox and Acheron", and Alecto".Megaera is the cause of jealousy and envy, and punishes people who commit crimes, especially marital infidelity. Like her sisters Alecto and Tisiphone, as well as the Melian Nymphs, she was born of the blood of Uranus when Cronus castrated him.In modern French (mégère), Portuguese (megera), Modern Greek (μέγαιρα), Italian (megera) and Russian (мегера), this name denotes a jealous or spiteful woman - Google translates all five as "shrew".

Nesoi

The Nesoi (Greek Nῆσοι "islands"), in ancient Greek religion, were the goddesses of islands. Each island was said to have its own personification. They were classified as one of the Protogenoi, otherwise known as ancient elemental Greek primordial deities. The Nesoi were thought to have been Ourea who were cast under the sea during one of Poseidon's rages.

Perses (Titan)

Perses (; Ancient Greek: Πέρσης) was the son of the Titan Crius and Eurybia. His name is derived from the Ancient Greek word perthō (πέρθω – "to sack", "to ravage", "to destroy"), the fact of which may have given scholars the impression that Perses was perhaps the Titan god of destruction. He was wed to Asteria (daughter of Phoebe and Coeus). They had one child noted in mythology, Hecate, honoured by Zeus above all others as the goddess of magic, crossroads, and witchcraft.

Phanes

Phanes (Ancient Greek: Φάνης, genitive Φάνητος) or Protogonus (Greek: Πρωτογόνος, "first-born") was the mystic primeval deity of procreation and the generation of new life, who was introduced into Greek mythology by the Orphic tradition; other names for this Classical Greek Orphic concept included Ericapaeus (Ἠρικαπαῖος or Ἠρικεπαῖος "power") and Metis ("thought").

Piculus

Piculus is a genus of bird in the family Picidae.

Theia

In Greek mythology, Theia (; Ancient Greek: Θεία, romanized: Theía, also rendered Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa "wide-shining", is a Titaness. Her brother/consort is Hyperion, a Titan and god of the sun, and together they are the parents of Helios (the Sun), Selene (the Moon), and Eos (the Dawn). She may be the same with Aethra, the consort of Hyperion and mother of his children in some accounts.

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