Lists of stars

The following are lists of stars. These are astronomical objects that spend some portion of their existence generating energy through thermonuclear fusion.

By location

By name

By proximity

By physical characteristic

By variability or other factor

Other star listings

Other stars

The following is a list of particularly notable actual or hypothetical stars that have their own articles in Wikipedia, but are not included in the lists above.

See also

References

Specific
  1. ^ Kelly, Patrick L.; et al. (2 April 2018). "Extreme magnification of an individual star at redshift 1.5 by a galaxy-cluster lens". Nature. 2: 334–342. arXiv:1706.10279. Bibcode:2018NatAs...2..334K. doi:10.1038/s41550-018-0430-3. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  2. ^ Howell, Elizabeth (2 April 2018). "Rare Cosmic Alignment Reveals Most Distant Star Ever Seen". Space.com. Retrieved 2 April 2018.

External links

  • International Astronomical Union: IAU
  • Sol Station — information on nearby and bright stars.
Historical brightest stars

The Solar System and all of the visible stars are in different orbits about the core of the Milky Way galaxy. Thus, their relative positions change over time, and for the nearer stars this movement can be measured. As a star moves toward or away from us, its apparent brightness changes. Sirius is currently the brightest star in Earth's night sky, but it has not always been so. Canopus has persistently been the brightest star over the ages; other stars appear brighter only during relatively temporary periods, during which they are passing the Solar System at a much closer distance than Canopus.

Working out exactly which stars were or will be the brightest at any given point in the past or future is difficult since it requires precise 3D proper motions of large numbers of stars and precise distances. This information only started to become available with the 1997 Hipparcos satellite data release. Jocelyn Tomkin used this data to compile a list of brightest star in Earth's night sky at each period within the last or next 5 million years. Reanalysis of the Hipparcos data and new data from the Gaia spacecraft have rendered the list somewhat outdated. For example, it doesn't include Gliese 710 which in about 1.35 million years time is expected to be close enough to have a magnitude of −2.7.

List of X-ray pulsars

This is a partial list of known accretion-powered pulsars, as of 1997.

List of black holes

This is a list of black holes (and stars considered probable candidates) organized by size (including black holes of undetermined mass); some items in this list are galaxies or star clusters that are believed to be organized around a black hole. Messier and New General Catalogue designations are given where possible.

List of brightest stars

This is a list of stars down to magnitude +2.50, as determined by their maximum, total, or combined visual magnitudes as viewed from Earth. Although several of the brightest stars are known binary or multiple star systems and are relatively close to Earth, they appear to the naked eye as single stars. The list below combines/adds the magnitudes of bright individual components. Most of the proper names in this list are those approved by the Working Group on Star Names. Popular star names here that have not been approved by the IAU appear with a short note.

List of hottest stars

This is a list of hottest stars so far discovered (excluding degenerate stars), arranged by decreasing temperature. The stars with temperatures higher than 60,000 K are included.

List of nearest black holes

This list contains all known black holes relatively near the Solar System (within our Milky Way galaxy). To make it easier to compare distances, our nearest star aside from the Sun – Proxima Centauri – is about 4.24 light years away and our Milky Way galaxy is 180,000 light years in diameter.

List of stars in Caelum

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Caelum, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Corvus

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Corvus, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Dorado

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Dorado, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Equuleus

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Equuleus, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Horologium

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Horologium, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Mensa

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Mensa, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Pyxis

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Pyxis, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Reticulum

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Reticulum, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars in Volans

This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Volans, sorted by decreasing brightness.

List of stars with proplyds

This is a list of stars with proplyds (protoplanetary discs) and includes whether they have gaps or planets.

List of white dwarfs

This is a list of exceptional white dwarfs.

Lists of stars by constellation

All stars but one can be associated with an IAU constellation. IAU constellations are areas of the sky. Although there are only 88 IAU constellations, the sky is actually divided into 89 irregularly shaped boxes as the constellation Serpens is split into two separate sections, Serpens Caput (the snake's head) to the west and Serpens Cauda (the snake's tail) to the east.

The only star that does not belong to a constellation is the Sun. The Sun travels through the 13 constellations along the ecliptic, the 12 of the Zodiac and Ophiuchus.

Among the remaining stars, the nearer ones exhibit proper motion, so it is only a matter of time before some of them cross a constellation boundary and switch constellations as a consequence. In 1992, Rho Aquilae became the first star to have its Bayer designation "invalidated" by moving to a neighbouring constellation—it is now a star of the constellation Delphinus.

Timeline of white dwarfs, neutron stars, and supernovae

Timeline of neutron stars, pulsars, supernovae, and white dwarfs

Note that this list is mainly about the development of knowledge, but also about some supernovae taking place. For a separate list of the latter, see the article List of supernovae. All dates refer to when the supernova was observed on Earth or would have been observed on Earth had powerful enough telescopes existed at the time.

Formation
Evolution
Spectral
classification
Remnants
Hypothetical
Nucleosynthesis
Structure
Properties
Star systems
Earth-centric
observations
Lists
Related articles

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.