Lists of sportspeople

There are a variety of articles listing sportspeople of a particular sport.

See also

Awards of Olympic Committee of Serbia

Awards of Olympic Committee of Serbia are proclaimed since 1994, at the end of each calendar year, to the most successful athletes. From 1994 to 2003 name was FR Yugoslavia and from 2003 to 2006 Serbia and Montenegro. Initially declared sportswoman and sportsman, and later introduced the award for best the women's team, the men's team, coach and young sportsperson. The competition includes results from current Olympic sports, also and from Chess Olympiad.

Awards of the Montenegrin Olympic Committee

Awards of the Montenegrin Olympic Committee (Montenegrin: Nagrade Crnogorskog olimpijskog komiteta) are proclaimed since 1999, at the end of each calendar year, to the most successful athletes. Initially declared Young Male Athlete, Young Female Athlete, Men's Team and Woman's Team, awards for the Sportsman of the Year were introduced in 2011. The competition includes results from current Olympic sports.

DSL Sport

Sport (Serbian Cyrillic: Спорт) was a Serbian daily sports newspaper. Тhе first edition was published on 5 May 1945 under the name Fiskultura and the last edition went out on 17 September 2016. Since the mid-2000s it was billed as "Dnevni sportski list" (daily sporting newspaper), while previously it used to be known as "Jugoslovenski sportski list" (Yugoslav sporting newspaper).

Editions were written in Serbian Cyrillic, at 24 to 32 pages, publishing news, results, reports, interviews from Serbia and the rest of the world, following more than 60 sports.

List of Luxembourgish sports players

This is a list of Luxembourgish sports players.

List of competitive eaters

The following is a list of notable competitive eaters.

Chis George Silviu (2015–present)

Sean Balls (2017–present)

Jimmy Cheema (2017–present)

Furious Pete (2004–present)

Patrick Bertoletti (2007–present)

Eric Booker (2001–present)

Joey Chestnut (2005–present)

Jesse Pynnönen (2013-present)

Crazy Legs Conti (2002–present)

Tim Janus (2004–2016),

Takeru Kobayashi (2001–present)

Rich LeFevre (2002–present)

Edward "Cookie" Jarvis (2001-2006)

Dominic "The Doginator" Cardo (2001-present)

Yasir Salem (2012–present)

Bob Shoudt (2002–present)

Matt Stonie (2009–present)

Miki Sudo (2011–present)

Sonya Thomas (2003–present)

Molly Schuyler (2012–present)

L.A. Beast (2010–present)

Beard Meats Food

Nela Zisser

Toby Lewis (Grove Champion)

Randy "Atlas" Santel

List of doping cases in sport

sporting body (an international governing body, a national federation, or a professional league), the outcome of a legal case, or their public admission.-->

The following is an incomplete list of sportspeople who have been involved in doping offences. It contains those who have been found to have, or have admitted to having, taken illegal performance-enhancing drugs, prohibited recreational drugs or have been suspended by a sports governing body for failure to submit to mandatory drug testing.

List of orienteers

This is a list of all orienteering competitors found in Wikipedia and notable within the orienteering sport.

List of sumo tournament second division champions

This is a list of wrestlers who have won the sumo second division jūryō championship since 1909, when the current championship system was established. These official tournaments are held exclusively in Japan.The wrestler who has won the most jūryō championships is Masurao, with five. Wakanami and Tagaryū are the only wrestlers to have won a jūryō championship after winning a top division or makuuchi title. The only wrestlers to win the jūryō championship but never earn promotion to the top division are Genbuyama (1927), Sagahikari (1957), Tochiizumi (1983), Hidenohana (1988) and Daigaku (1991).

List of sumo tournament top division runners-up

The table below lists the runners up (jun-yusho) in the top makuuchi division at official sumo tournaments or honbasho since the six tournaments per year system was instituted in 1958. The runner up is determined by the wrestler(s) with the second highest win-loss score after fifteen bouts, held at a rate of one per day over the duration of the 15-day tournament.

Names in italics mark a jun-yusho performance by a maegashira or lower ranked wrestler. Figures in brackets mark the number of jun-yusho earned up to that tournament for wrestlers who were runner up more than once. Those with a P after their name means they were the runner up after a playoff.

List of table tennis players

This list of table tennis players is alphabetically ordered by surname. The main source of the information included in this page is the official International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) database. More detailed information about their careers is available in the individual players' articles, and in the ITTF database.

List of underwater divers

This is a list of underwater divers whose exploits have made them notable.

List of volleyball players

This is a list of top international volleyball players.

List of yokozuna

This is a list of all sumo wrestlers who have reached the sport's highest rank of yokozuna. It was not recorded on the banzuke until 1890 and was not officially recognised as sumo's highest rank until 1909. Until then, yokozuna was merely a licence given to certain ōzeki to perform the dohyō-iri ceremony. It was not always the strongest ōzeki but those with the most influential patrons who were chosen.

The first list of yokozuna (with 17 names in total) was compiled by the 12th yokozuna Jinmaku Kyūgorō in 1900 but was not regarded as official until 1926 when it was published by the newly formed Japan Sumo Association and updated to 31 names. Since that time, 41 more yokozuna have been promoted. The Sumo Association have overseen all promotions since Chiyonoyama's in 1951. Two consecutive tournament championships or an "equivalent performance" are the minimum requirement for promotion to yokozuna in modern sumo.

The longest serving yokozuna was the 36th, Haguroyama Masaji from Nakanokuchi, Niigata. He was promoted in May 1941 and held the rank until his retirement in 1953, an all-time record of 12 years and three months.

The number of top division championships won by each yokozuna is also listed. Those listed for yokozuna active before the summer tournament of 1909 are historically conferred from the win/loss records of the time as no system of championships existed up to this time.

Professional Squash Association

The Professional Squash Association (PSA) is the governing body for the men's and women's professional squash circuit. The body operates in a similar fashion to the ATP and the WTA for tennis. The PSA World Tour involves over 200 tournaments annually all over the globe. Over 800 players from all the 5 continents (over 60 different countries represented ) are registered with the PSA and rankings are updated monthly based on players' performances.

In November 2014, the WSA and the PSA announced a historic merger between the two associations. A decision was reached to designate the PSA operate as the governing body for both the women's and men's ranks from January 1, 2015.

Sportspeople who died during their careers

Lists of sportspeople who died during their careers:

List of American football players who died during their careers

List of association footballers who died while playing

List of association footballers who died during their careers

List of Australian rules footballers who died during their careers

List of basketball players who died during their careers

List of baseball players who died during their careers

List of deaths due to injuries sustained in boxing

List of fatal accidents in cricket

List of professional cyclists who died during a race

List of ice hockey players who died during their careers

List of marathon fatalities

List of fatal accidents in motorboat racing

Rider deaths in motorcycle racing

Driver deaths in motorsport

List of Billown Course fatal accidents

List of Brands Hatch Circuit fatal accidents

List of fatal Champ Car accidents

List of Daytona International Speedway fatalities

List of Dundrod Circuit fatal accidents

List of fatal Formula One accidents

List of Hockenheimring fatal accidents

List of fatalities at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

List of Kyalami Grand Prix Circuit fatal accidents

List of 24 Hours of Le Mans fatal accidents

List of Autodromo Nazionale Monza fatal accidents

List of NASCAR fatal accidents

List of Nürburgring fatal accidents

Driver and co-driver deaths in rallying events

List of Dakar Rally fatal accidents

List of fatal World Rally Championship accidents

List of Snaefell Mountain Course fatal accidents

List of Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps fatal accidents

List of Suzuka Circuit fatal accidents

List of Watkins Glen International fatalities

List of deaths on eight-thousanders

List of people who died climbing Mount Everest

List of fatal accidents in sailboat racing

List of premature professional wrestling deaths

Sudden cardiac death of athletes

Women's Squash Association

The Women's Squash Association (WSA) was the governing body for the women's professional squash circuit between 2011 and 2014. It was based in London, England. The body operated in a similar fashion to the WTA for tennis. The WSA World Tour involved over 100 tournaments annually all over the globe. Over 250 players were registered with the WSA and rankings were updated monthly based on players' performances. In November 2014, the WSA and the PSA announced a historic merger between the two associations.[3] A decision was reached that will see the PSA operate as the governing body for both the women's and men's ranks from January 1, 2015.

Basket sports
Football codes
Bat-and-ball games
Stick and ball sports
Net sports
Other sports

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