List of volcanoes in China

This is a list of active and extinct volcanoes in China.

Name Elevation Location
coordinates
Last eruption
meters feet
Changbai Mountain 2744 9003 41°59′N 128°05′E / 41.98°N 128.08°E 1903
Honggeertu 1700 5577 41°28′N 113°00′E / 41.47°N 113.00°E Holocene
Jingpo Lake 500 1640 44°05′N 128°50′E / 44.08°N 128.83°E 520 BC
23 peaks in the Keluo field 670 2198 49°22′N 125°55′E / 49.37°N 125.92°E Holocene
Kunlun
(See also Kunlun Mountains)
5808 19,055 35°30′N 80°12′E / 35.50°N 80.20°E 1951
74 others in the Leizhou Peninsula fields 259 850 20°50′N 109°47′E / 20.83°N 109.78°E Holocene
Longgang 1000 3281 42°20′N 126°30′E / 42.33°N 126.50°E 350
Several around Tengchong County 2865 9399 25°14′N 98°30′E / 25.23°N 98.50°E 5050 BC
Tianshan Volcanic Group - - 42°30′N 86°30′E / 42.50°N 86.50°E 650
Tianyang (田洋) 20°31′N 110°18′E / 20.52°N 110.30°E Holocene
Turfan - - 42°54′N 89°15′E / 42.90°N 89.25°E 1120 (±150 years)
Northern Tibet volcanic field 5400 17716 35°51′N 91°42′E / 35.85°N 91.70°E Holocene
Wudalianchi 597 1959 48°43′N 126°07′E / 48.72°N 126.12°E 1776
Yingfengling 20°34′N 110°11′E / 20.56°N 110.19°E Holocene
72 peaks of Mount Xiqiao 346 1156 22°35′N 112°35′E / 22.58°N 112.58°E Eocene (Extinct)

Volcanic Fields in China

References

  1. ^ "Arshan". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  2. ^ "Honggeertu". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  3. ^ "Jingbo". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  4. ^ "Keluo". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  5. ^ "Kunlun Volcanic Group". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  6. ^ "Longgang Group". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  7. ^ "Hainen Dao". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  8. ^ "Leizhou Bandao". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  9. ^ "Tengchong". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  10. ^ "Tianshan Volcanic Group". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
  11. ^ "Wudalianchi". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2015-11-07.
Haikou Volcanic Cluster Global Geopark

Haikou Volcanic Cluster Global Geopark (Chinese: 雷琼世界地质公园), also known as Haikou Scenic-Shishan Volcano Cluster, Leiqiong Global Geopark, Haikou Crater Park, and Hainan Crater Park is a national park located approximately 15 km west of Haikou, Hainan, China. It is named for a crater, one of many extinct volcanoes on the island.The park has a total area of 118 square kilometres. It contains the two towns Shishan Town and Yongxing Town, and more than 40 Quaternary volcanoes. Part of the area is called Mount Maanling (Saddle) Crater Scenic Area. This area consists of the two major volcanoes, Mount Fengliung (furnace) and Mount Baoziling. Together they appear as a saddle, hence the name. Adjacent to these, there are another two volcanoes, one of which is called Mount Yanjinglin.

Jingpo Lake

Jingpo Lake or Lake Jingpo (Chinese: 镜泊湖) is a lake located in the upper reaches of the Mudan River among the Wanda Mountains in Ningan County, Heilongjiang, in the People's Republic of China. Earlier names for the lake include Meituohu Lake (湄沱湖), Huhanhai Lake (忽汗海), and Bilten Lake (Manchurian: ᠪᡳᠯᡨᡝᠨ ;Chinese: 畢爾騰湖).

The length of the lake from north to south is 45 kilometers (28 mi) and the widest distance between east and west is only 6 kilometers (3.7 mi). The area is 95 km2 (37 sq mi) and the storage capacity is 1.63 billion m3. The south part of lake is shallow with the deepest place in the northern part at 62 meters (203 ft).

The lake was created about 10,000 years ago when volcanic eruptions in the region blocked the flow of the Mudanjiang River.

The northern side of the river cascades down the Diaoshuilou Falls, a 40 m (130 ft) waterfall formed by the lake. This lake is famous for its craggy limestone cliffs (similar to those of Guilin) and its turquoise-colored waters containing 40 types of fish and fresh water coral.

On Titan, the largest moon of the planet Saturn, there is a large surface body of liquid hydrocarbons, Jingpo Lacus, named after Jingpo Lake.

Keluo

Keluo (Chinese: 科洛, p Kēluò) is a dormant volcanic field 310 kilometers (190 mi) north-by-northwest of Daquijin in northeastern China. It is located at an intersection of regional lineaments trending northeast and northwest; the volcanoes were erupted through basement igneous and sedimentary rocks from the Jurassic to Cretaceous, through granite, and through pre-Permian metasediments. Like the Wudalianchi volcanic to its south, it contains high-potassium basaltic cinder cones.The field possesses 23 cones over an area of 350 km2 (140 sq mi). There are reports of historical activity, but these remain unconfirmed. The morphology of a number of the cones—including Nanshan (南山), Gushan (孤山), Jianshan (尖山), Dayishan (大椅山), and Xiaoyishan (小椅山)—suggests their formation during the last 10,000 years (the Holocene). Most cones to the northeast, however, probably date from the Pleistocene to the Tertiary.Other peaks include Dangzishan, Heishan, and Muhenanshan.

Lists of volcanoes

Below is a list of (almost) all volcanoes in the world.

Paektu Mountain

Paektu Mountain, also known as Baekdu Mountain, and in China as Changbai Mountain, is an active supervolcano on the Chinese–North Korean border. At 2,744 m (9,003 ft), it is the highest mountain of the Changbai and Baekdudaegan ranges. Koreans assign a mythical quality to the volcano and its caldera lake, considering it to be their country's spiritual home. It is the highest mountain in North Korea, the Korean Peninsula, and Northeast China.A large crater lake, called Heaven Lake, is in the caldera atop the mountain. The caldera was formed by the VEI 7 "Millennium" or "Tianchi" eruption of 946, which erupted about 100–120 km3 (24–29 cu mi) of tephra. This was one of the largest and most violent eruptions in the last 5,000 years (alongside the Minoan eruption, the Hatepe eruption of Lake Taupo in around AD 180, the 1257 eruption of Mount Samalas near Mount Rinjani, and the 1815 eruption of Tambora).

The mountain plays an important cultural role in the societies and civil religions of both contemporary Korean states, for instance, it is mentioned in both of their national anthems and is depicted on the national emblem of North Korea.

Volcanoes of China

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