List of stratigraphic units with dinosaur body fossils

This is a list of stratigraphic units from which dinosaur body fossils have been recovered. Although Dinosauria is a clade which includes modern birds, this article covers only Mesozoic stratigraphic units. Units listed are all either formation rank or higher (e.g. group).

By diversity

Here the units are sorted by the number of genera that have been reported as being represented in their respective fossil yields. Since the creation or synonymy of genera can be subjective, the sorting of the units can only roughly approximate their known paleobiodiversities.

>20

Name Age Location Description

Bissekty Formation[1]

Late Turonian to Coniacian[1]

Cedar Mountain Formation[2]

Barremian to basal Cenomanian

Dinosaur Park Formation[3]

Late Campanian[3]

Djadochta Formation[4]

Middle Campanian[4]

has many alternate spellings

Elliot Formation[5]

Norian to Sinemurian

Hell Creek Formation[6]

Late Maastrichtian[6]

Horseshoe Canyon Formation[7]

Early Maastrichtian[7]

Jiufotang Formation[8]

Aptian[8]

Judith River Formation[9]

Late Campanian[9]

Lance Formation[10]

Late Maastrichtian[10]

Morrison Formation[11]

Kimmeridgian to Early Tithonian

Nemegt Formation[12]

Early Maastrichtian[12]

has a few alternate spellings

Shaximiao Formation[13]

Bathonian to basal Oxfordian

Two Medicine Formation[14]

Campanian[14]

Wessex Formation[15]

Barremian[15]

Yixian Formation[16]

Barremian[16]

11-20

Name Age Location Description

Aguja Formation[17]

Campanian[17]

Barun Goyot Formation[19]

Middle Campanian (?)[19]

has a few alternate spellings

Bayan Shireh Formation[20]

Cenomanian to Santonian[20]

has many alternate spellings

Ferris Formation[21]

Late Maastrichtian [22]

Frenchman Formation[23]

Late Maastrichtian[23]

Fruitland Formation[24]

Middle Campanian

Hastings Beds[25]

Late Berriasian to Valanginian[25]

Iren Dabasu Formation[26]

?Campanian[26]

Kimmeridge Clay[27]

Kimmeridgian to Late Tithonian[27]

Kirtland Formation[28]

Late Campanian[28] to Early Maastrichtian[29]

Lameta Formation[30]

Late Maastrichtian

Laramie Formation[31]

Late Maastrichtian[31]

Lower Lufeng Series[32]

Oldman Formation[33]

Late Campanian[33]

Oxford Clay[34]

Callovian[34]

Rio Colorado Formation[35]

Campanian

Scollard Formation[36]

Late Maastrichtian[36]

Tendaguru Formation[37]

Kimmeridgian[37]

Wangshi Group[38]

Xinminbao Group[39]

Barremian to Albian[39]

6-10

Name Age Location Description

Adamantina Formation[40]

Late Cretaceous [41][42]

Allen Formation[43]

Middle Campanian[43]

Almond Formation[44]

Anacleto Formation

Antlers Formation[45]

Late Aptian to Middle Albian[45]

Arén Formation[46]

Arundel Clay[47]

Middle Aptian to Early Albian.[47]

Baharija Formation[48]

Bajo Barreal Formation[49]

Cenomanian to Coniacian[49]

Bajo de la Carpa Formation

Bauxite of Cornet[50]

Bayan Mandahu Formation

Camadas de Alcobaça[51]

Kimmeridgian[51]

Camadas de Guimarota[52]

Castellar Formation[53]

Chipping Norton Formation[54]

Clarens Formation[55]

Sinemurian[55]

Cloverly Formation[56]

Late Aptian[56]

Denver Formation[57]

Maastrichtian[57]

Elrhaz Formation[58]

Late Aptian[58]

Foremost Formation[59]

Forest Marble Formation[60]

Gosau Formation[61]

Campanian[61]

Gres a reptiles[62]

Early Maastrichtian[62]

Hornerstown Formation[63]

Ischigualasto Formation[64]

Carnian[64]

Kaiparowits Formation[65]

Late Campanian[65]

Knollenmergel[66]

La Huérguina Formation[67]

Lecho Formation[68]

Maevarano Formation[69]

Campanian[69]

Milk River Formation[70]

Early Campanian[70]

Minhe Formation[71]

Niobrara Chalk[72]

Coniacian to Early Campanian[72]

Prince Creek Formation[73]

Rio Neuquen Formation[74]

Sânpetru Formation[75]

Late Maastrichtian[75]

Sao Khua Formation[76]

Hauterivian to Valanginian[76]

Stubensandstein[77]

Middle Norian[77]

Tugulu Group[78]

?Valanginian to Albian[78]

Unidade Bombarral[79]

Indeterminate

This list includes stratigraphic units that have produced dinosaur remains, although none of these remains have been referred to a specific genus.

By preservation

Bone beds and mass graves

Name Age Location Description

Morrison Formation[11]

Jurassic

Lagerstatten

Name Age Location Description

Solnhofen limestone

Kimmeridgian[80]

Yixian Formation[16]

Barremian[16]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b "Bissekty Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 594.
  2. ^ "Cedar Mountain Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 554, 579.
  3. ^ a b c "Dinosaur Park Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 576-78.
  4. ^ a b c d "Djadochta Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 596-98.
  5. ^ a b c "Elliot Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 528-529, 536.
  6. ^ a b c "Hell Creek Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 584-586.
  7. ^ a b c "Horseshoe Canyon Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 577.
  8. ^ a b c "Jiufotang Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 565-66.
  9. ^ a b c "Judith River Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 583.
  10. ^ a b c "Lance Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 585-586.
  11. ^ a b c "Morrison Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 543-545.
  12. ^ a b c "Nemegt Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 596-597.
  13. ^ a b "Shaximiao Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 542, 550-1.
  14. ^ a b c "Two Medicine Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 582-583.
  15. ^ a b c "Wessex Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 558-559.
  16. ^ a b c d e f "Yixian Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 566-567.
  17. ^ a b c "Late Cretaceous; North America; Texas; Aguja Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pp. 581-582.
  18. ^ "Late Cretaceous; North America; Estado de Chihuahua, Mexico; Aguja Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 588.
  19. ^ a b "Barun Goyot Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 595-597.
  20. ^ a b "Bayan Shireh Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 596-597.
  21. ^ a b "Ferris Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 585.
  22. ^ Hartman, Joseph Herbert; Johnson, Kirk R.; Nichols, Douglas J. (2002). The Hell Creek Formation and the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary in the Northern Great Plains: An Integrated Continental Record of the End of the Cretaceous. Geological Society of America. ISBN 9780813723617.
  23. ^ a b c "Frenchman Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 578.
  24. ^ a b "Fruitland Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 580.
  25. ^ a b c "Hastings Beds Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 559.
  26. ^ a b c "Iren Dabasu Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 598.
  27. ^ a b c "Kimmeridge Clay Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 546.
  28. ^ a b "Lower Kirtland Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 580.
  29. ^ a b "Upper Kirtland Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 580-581.
  30. ^ "Lameta Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 595.
  31. ^ a b c "Laramie Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 581.
  32. ^ a b "Lower Lufeng Series Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 534.
  33. ^ a b c "Oldman Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 576.
  34. ^ a b c "Oxford Clay Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 539-540.
  35. ^ a b "Rio Colorado Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 603-4.
  36. ^ a b c "Scollard Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 578.
  37. ^ a b c "Tendaguru Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 552.
  38. ^ "Wangshi Group." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 598, 600.
  39. ^ a b c "Xinminbao Group Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 567.
  40. ^ Weishampel, David B; et al. (2004). "Dinosaur distribution (Late Cretaceous, South America)." In: Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 600-604. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
  41. ^ Turner, A.H.; Calvo, J.O. (2005). "A new sebecosuchian crocodyliform from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25 (1): 87–98. doi:10.1671/0272-4634(2005)025[0087:ANSCFT]2.0.CO;2.
  42. ^ Marco Brandalise de Andrade; Reinaldo J. Bertini (2008). "A new Sphagesaurus (Mesoeucrocodylia: Notosuchia) from the Upper Cretaceous of Monte Alto City (Bauru Group, Brazil), and a revision of the Sphagesauridae". Historical Biology. 20 (2): 101–136. doi:10.1080/08912960701642949.
  43. ^ a b c "Late Cretaceous; South America; Provincia de Río Negro, Argentina; Allen Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 604.
  44. ^ "Almond Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 584.
  45. ^ a b c "Early Cretaceous; North America; "Texas" and "Oklahoma;" Antlers Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 555.
  46. ^ "Aréen Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 591.
  47. ^ a b "Early Cretaceous; North America; "Maryland" and "Washington, D.C.;" Arundel Clay)." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 556.
  48. ^ "Baharija Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 605.
  49. ^ a b "Bajo Barreal Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 602.
  50. ^ "Bauxite of Cornet." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 562.
  51. ^ a b "Camadas de Alcobaça." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 548-549.
  52. ^ "Camadas de Guimarota." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 548.
  53. ^ "Castellar Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 560-1.
  54. ^ "Chipping Norton Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 538,540.
  55. ^ a b "Clarens Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 536.
  56. ^ a b "Cloverly Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 556.
  57. ^ a b "Denver Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 581.
  58. ^ a b c "Elrhaz Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 572.
  59. ^ "Foremost Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 576.
  60. ^ "Forest Marble Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 538-40.
  61. ^ a b c "Gosau Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 592.
  62. ^ a b c "Gres a reptiles Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 589-90.
  63. ^ "Hornerstown Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 586.
  64. ^ a b c "Ischigualasto Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 528.
  65. ^ a b c "Kaiparowits Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 579-80.
  66. ^ "Knollenmergel Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 524.
  67. ^ "La Huergina Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 561-62.
  68. ^ "Lecho Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 603.
  69. ^ a b c "Maevarano Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 605.
  70. ^ a b "Milk River Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 576.
  71. ^ "Minhe Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 598-9.
  72. ^ a b c "Niobrara Chalk Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 582,586.
  73. ^ "Prince Creek Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 587.
  74. ^ "Rio Neuquen Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 603.
  75. ^ a b c "Sânpetru Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 592-593.
  76. ^ a b c "Sao Khua Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 569.
  77. ^ a b c "Stubensandstein Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 524.
  78. ^ a b c "Tugulu Group Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 567.
  79. ^ "Unidade Bombarral." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 548-9.
  80. ^ a b "Solnhofen Formation." Weishampel, et al. (2004). Pg. 549.

References

  • Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. 861 pp. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
Fruitland Formation

The Fruitland Formation is a sedimentary geological formation containing layers of sandstone, shale, and coal. It was laid down in marshy delta conditions, with poor drainage and frequent flooding, under a warm, humid and seasonal climate. It is found in the San Juan Basin in the states of New Mexico and Colorado, in the United States of America. The Fruitland Formation contains beds of bituminous coal that are mined in places along the outcrop. Since the 1980s, the coal beds of the Fruitland Formation have yielded large quantities of coalbed methane. The productive area for coalbed methane straddles the Colorado-New Mexico state line, and is one of the most productive areas for coalbed methane in the United States.

Kirtland Formation

The Kirtland Formation (originally the Kirtland Shale) is a sedimentary geological formation. It is the product of alluvial muds and overbank sand deposits from the many channels draining the coastal plain that existed on the inland seashore of North America, in the late Cretaceous period. It overlies the Fruitland Formation. It is found in the San Juan Basin in the states of New Mexico and Colorado, in the United States of America.

The base of the Kirtland Formation and its lowest sub-unit, the Hunter Wash member, has been dated to 74.55 ± 0.29 Ma. Together with the upper part of the underlying Fruitland Formation, this contains fossils representing the Hunter Wash local fauna. The border between the Hunter Wash member and overlying Farmington member dates to approximately 74 million years ago. The top of the Farmington member and bottom of the overlying De-na-zin member has been radiometrically dated to 73.37 ± 0.28 Ma ago. The top of the De-na-zin member, which contains the Willow Wash local fauna, has been dated to 73.04 ± 0.25 Ma ago.Overlying the De-na-zin member is a unit called the Naashoibito member This has often been considered to be part of the Kirtland formation, but more recently has been transferred back to the overlying Ojo Alamo Formation, which it had originally been part of.

Lists of dinosaur-bearing stratigraphic units

This list of dinosaur-bearing rock formations is a list of geologic formations in which dinosaur fossils have been documented.

Outline of dinosaurs

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to dinosaurs:

Dinosaurs – diverse group of animals of the clade and superorder Dinosauria. They were the dominant terrestrial vertebrates for over 160 million years, from the late Triassic period (about 230 million years ago) until the end of the Cretaceous (66 million years ago), when the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event led to the extinction of all non-avian dinosaurs at the close of the Mesozoic era.

The fossil record indicates that birds evolved within theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period. Some of them survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, including the ancestors of all modern birds. Consequently, in modern classification systems, birds are considered dinosaurs—the only group which survived to the present day. The outline of birds covers these avian dinosaurs.

Río Colorado Subgroup

The Río Colorado Subgroup, formerly named as Río Colorado Formation, is a Late Cretaceous (Santonian to Early Campanian) geologic subgroup of the Neuquén Basin in northern Patagonia, Argentina. It belongs to the Neuquén Group and contains the Anacleto and Bajo de la Carpa Formations. The subgroup overlies the Río Neuquén Subgroup and is overlain by the Allen Formation of the Malargüe Group, separated by an unconformity dated to 79 Ma. Dinosaur remains diagnostic to the genus level are among the fossils that have been recovered from the formation.

Tendaguru Formation

The Tendaguru Formation, or Tendaguru Beds are a highly fossiliferous formation and Lagerstätte in southeastern Tanzania. The formation represents the oldest sedimentary unit of the Mandawa Basin, overlying Neoproterozoic basement, separating by a long hiatus and unconformity. The formation reaches a total sedimentary thickness of more than 110 metres (360 ft). The formation ranges in age from the late Middle Jurassic to the early Early Cretaceous, Oxfordian to Hauterivian stages, with the base of the formation possibly extending into the Callovian.

The Tendaguru Formation is subdivided into six members; from oldest to youngest Lower Dinosaur Member, the Nerinella Member, the Middle Dinosaur Member, Indotrigonia africana Member, the Upper Dinosaur Member, and the Rutitrigonia bornhardti-schwarzi Member. The succession comprises a sequence of sandstones, shales, siltstones, conglomerates with minor oolitic limestones, deposited in an overall shallow marine to coastal plain environment, characterized by tidal, fluvial and lacustrine influence with a tsunami deposit occurring in the Indotrigonia africana Member. The climate of the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous was semi-arid with seasonal rainfall and the eustatic sea level was rising in the Late Jurassic from low levels in the Middle Jurassic. Paleogeographical reconstructions show the Tendaguru area was located in the subtropical southern hemisphere during the Late Jurassic.

The Tendaguru Formation is considered the richest Late Jurassic strata in Africa. The formation has provided a wealth of fossils of different groups; early mammaliaforms, several genera of dinosaurs, crocodyliforms, amphibians, fish, invertebrates and flora. More than 250 tonnes (250 long tons; 280 short tons) of material was shipped to Germany during early excavations in the early twentieth century. The faunal assemblage of the Tendaguru is similar to the Morrison Formation of the central-western United States, with an additional marine interbed fauna not present in the Morrison.

The dinosaur fauna found in the formation is similar to that of other highly fossiliferous stratigraphic units of the Late Jurassic; among others the Kimmeridge and Oxford Clays of England, the Sables de Glos, Argiles d'Octeville, Marnes de Bléville of France, the Alcobaça, Guimarota and Lourinhã Formations of Portugal, the Villar del Arzobispo Formation of Spain, the Shishugou, Kalazha and Shangshaximiao Formations in China, the Toqui Formation of Chile and Cañadón Calcáreo Formation of Argentina and the Morrison Formation, with the presence of dinosaurs with similar counterparts, e.g., Brachiosaurus and Stegosaurus in the Morrison, and Giraffatitan and Kentrosaurus in the Tendaguru.

Wessex Formation

The Wessex Formation is a fossil-rich English geological formation that dates from the Berriasian to Barremian stages (about 145–125 million years ago) of the Early Cretaceous. It forms part of the Wealden Group and underlies the younger Vectis Formation and overlies the Durlston Formation. The dominant lithology of this unit is mudstone with some interbedded sandstones.

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