List of ships of the line of Spain

This is a list of Spanish ships of the line (comprising the battlefleet) built or acquired during the period 1640-1854:
Those with 94 or more guns were three-deckers, while all the others listed were two-deckers. Those ships with secular names (e.g. royal, geographical or adjectival names) were additionally given an official religious name (or advocación) which appears below in parenthesis following the secular name.

Until 1716 there was not one single Spanish Navy but several naval forces, of which the Armada del Mar Océano was the primary one but several other distinct forces existed. The Real Armada ("Royal Navy") was created by the newly-established Bourbon government in 1716, but the other armadas (in Spanish, the word "armada" is used for both "navy" and "fleet") endured for several years thereafter. During the early 1750s, the term Real Armada was replaced by Armada Español.

The later Habsburg fleet - 1640 to 1700

  • Lion de Oro 24 guns (May 1641)
  • León Coronado 28 (launched 17 June 1651)
  • Nuestra Señora de la Concepción (c. 1656)
  • Nuestra Señora del Buen Consejo (c. 1662)
  • Santiago 58 (1662)
  • San Miguel (c. 1662)
  • San Joseph (c. 1662)
  • San Pedro y San Pablo (c. 1662)
  • San Ignacio 36 (1664)
  • San Salvador 40 (1664)
  • Nuestra Señora del Rosario 70 (1665)
  • Nuestra Señora del Pilar 64 (1668)
  • Santa Ana 54 (1668)
  • Concepcion de Napoles 40 (1672)
  • San Antonio de Napoles 44 (1672)
  • San Bernardo 44 (1672)
  • San Carlos 44 (1672)
  • Santiago 80 (1673) - not recorded after 1673
  • San Joaquín 80 (1676) - not recorded after 1676
  • Santa Rosa 56 (1677) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro, 1718, BU c. 1731
  • Nuestra Señora de la Concepción y las Animas 94 guns (1687)
  • Santisima Trinidad 80 guns (1692)
  • San Juan 56 (1683) - captured in August 1692
  • Nuestra Señora de la Concepción class. These two ships served as the capitana (flagship) and almiranta (second-in-command flagship) respectively of the Armada del Mar del Sur. They were both reduced to 30 guns when substantively rebuilt in 1726-28.
    • Nuestra Señora de la Concepción 50 (launched 1692 at Guayaquil) - broken up in 1744
    • Santisima Sacramento 50 (launched 1692 at Guayaquil) - broken up in 1743
  • San Francisco 70 (1695) - no report after 1700
  • Nuestra Señora del Rosario 42 (acquired 1696 at Veracruz). wrecked in September 1705
  • Santa Maria de Tezanos y Las Animas 60 (1697) - foundered 14 November 1701
  • Santo Cristo de San Roman 50 (1698) - wrecked 31 July 1715
  • Nuestra Señora de la Almudena y San Cayetano 50 (1699) - broken up 1708
  • San José class. These two ships served as the capitana (flagship) and almiranta (second-in-command flagship) respectively of the Armada de la Carrera de Indias.
    • San José 60 (launched 1698 at Orio) - blown up on 8 June 1708
    • San Joaquín 60 (launched 1698 at Orio) - captured on 7 August 1711
  • Nuestra Señora de Begoña 60 (1699) - broken up 1710
  • San Juan Bautista 50 (1700) - wrecked in September 1702
  • Rubí 50 (Acquired 1700) - Wrecked 1727

The Early Bourbon fleet - 1701 to 1728

  • Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe 50/58 (Acquired 1703) - Wrecked 1724
  • Porto Coeli Class, 62 guns
    • Porto Coeli 62 (launched 1704 at Orio)
    • Santa Teresa 62 (launched 1704 at Orio)
  • El Salvador 66 (launched 1705 at Barcelona)
  • Nuestra Señora del Carmen y San Antonio 70 (1711)
  • Nuestra Señora del Carmen 60 (1713)
  • Real de Mazi (El Real) 60 (Acquired 1714) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro, 11 August 1718, BU c. 1731
  • Nuestra Señora de Begoña 54/70 (launched 1703 at Genoa, acquired February 1714) - Stricken 1724
  • Peibo del ler San Francisco 60 (Acquired 1714) - Wrecked 1716
  • Pembroke 60 (1694, ex-British Pembroke, acquired 1709/14) - Wrecked 1718
  • Lanfranco 60 (Acquired 1716) - Wrecked 1716
  • Nuestra Señora de Las Vinas 60 - Sunk 11 August 1718
  • San Pedro Class 60 gun
    • San Pedro 60 (launched 26 March 1716 at Pasajes) - Wrecked 31 December 1718
    • Santa Isabel 60 (launched 7 September 1716 at Pasajes) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro 11 August 1718, BU c. 1731
    • San Juan Bautista 60 (launched 1 January 1717 at Pasajes) - Wrecked 26 December 1719
    • San Luis 60 (launched 26 June 1717 at Orio) - Wrecked 10 May 1720
    • San Fernando 60 (launched 26 June 1717 at Orio) - Scuttled 14 November 1719
    • San Felipe 60 (launched 26 July 1717 at Orio)
  • San Carlos 60 (launched 1717 at Orio) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro 11 August 1718, BU c. 1731
  • San Felipe el Real 80 (launched 25 May 1716 at Sant Feliú de Guíxols) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro 11 August 1718; taken to Port Mahon (Menorca) where blew up by accident.
  • Hermione 50 (Acquired 1716) - Stricken 1721
  • San Isidro 50 (1716) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro 11 August 1718, BU c. 1731
  • Hércules 50 (Acquired 1716) - Stricken 1718
  • Príncipe de Asturias 70 (1695, ex-Genovese, sold 1717, ex-French Cumberland, sold 1715, ex-British HMS Cumberland 80, captured 1707) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Passaro 11 August 1718, sold to Austria 1720, renamed San Carlos, finally to Neapolitan Navy as San Carlo (thus earning the distinction of service in six countries' navies). BU 1733.
  • Santa Rosa Palermo (Santa Rosalia) 60 (1717?, ex-Piedmontese, captured 1718) - Scuttled 1719
  • Victoria 60 (1717?, ex-Piedmontese, captured 1718) - Scuttled 1719
  • Triunfo 60/66 (1717?, ex-Piedmontese, captured 1718) - Scuttled 1719
  • Cambi 60/66 (launched 27 November 1718 at Sant Feliú de Guíxols) - Burnt 1725
  • Catalán 62 (launched 12 January 1719 at Sant Feliú de Guíxols) - Stricken 1731
  • (6 battleships) - Burnt on stocks at Pasajes, 1719
  • (3 battleships) - Burnt on stocks at Santoña, 1719
  • Conde de Tolosa (San José) 56/58 (purchased 1718 from France) - Wrecked 15 October 1724
  • Conquistador 62/64 (ex-Genovese, sold 1720, ex-French, sold 1711, ex-British HMS Gloucester 60, captured 1709) - Stricken 16 November 1728
  • San Francisco 62 (Acquired 1720) - Wrecked 1739
  • Sanguineto (Estrella del Mar) 64 (purchased 30 July 1720 at Genoa) - Stricken 1730
  • Lanfranco (Nuestra Señora del Pilar) 62 (purchased 28 September 1720 at Genoa) - Wrecked 1739
  • Gran Princesa de los Cielos 80 (purchased 2 October 1720 at Genoa) - wrecked 1 April 1726
  • Infante 60 (purchased 15 November 1720 at Genoa) - Wrecked 15 July 1733
  • San Foit (San Jorge) 60 (purchased June 1721 at Amsterdam) - Stricken December 1721
  • Gallo Indiano 58 (purchased 1723, built at Tlacotalpan) - Wrecked 15 July 1733
  • Potencia 58 (Acquired 1723) - Stricken 1738
  • San Esteban 50 (1723) - Stricken 1745
  • San Luis Class 62 guns
    • San Luis 62 (launched 1724 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 1745
    • San Fernando 62 (launched 1724 at Guarnizo) - Hulked 1746
    • San Carlos 62 (launched 11 September 1726 at Guarnizo) - Scuttled 5 April 1741
    • San Antonio 62 (launched 1 January 1727 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 1750
  • San Francisco Javier 50/52 (1724) - Hulked 1749
  • San Juan 54/60 (1724) - Stricken 1741
  • San Felipe 70 (launched 11 September 1726 at Guarnizo) - Scuttled 5 April 1741
  • Incendio (San Lorenzo) 58 (1726) - Wrecked 1739
  • San Francisco de Asís 52 (ex-Dutch, captured 1726) - Hulked 1735
  • Retiro (San Geronimo) 54 (1727) - Sold 1737
  • Rosa 56 (1727) - Wrecked 1736
  • Paloma Indiana 52 (1727) - Stricken 1745
  • Fuerte (Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe) 60 (launched 1727 at Havana) - Sold 1739
  • Constante (San Dionisio) 60 (launched 1728 at Havana) - Wrecked 22 February 1730

The First French phase - 1729 to 1750

  • Santa Ana class, 70 guns
    • Santa Ana 70 (launched 14 February 1729 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 30 November 1745
    • Reina 70 (launched 14 July 1729 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 3 July 1743
  • Victoria 50 (launched 14 February 1729 at Guarnizo) - Wrecked 1738
  • Santiago 60 (launched 1729 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 29 November 1745
  • Santa Isabel 80 (launched 17 January 1730 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 1747
  • Andalucia class, 62 guns
    • Andalucía (Nuestra Señora del Carmen) 62 (launched 17 January 1730 at Pasajes) - Wrecked September 1740
    • Santa Teresa 62 (launched 17 January 1730 at Pasajes) - Stricken 1 November 1743
    • Castilla 62 (launched 17 January 1730 at Pasajes) - Stricken 1736
    • Rubí 62 (launched 31 July 1731 at Pasajes) - Wrecked 15 October 1733
  • Hércules class, 60 guns
    • Hércules 60 (launched 14 April 1729 at Cadiz) - Stricken 1749
    • Real Familia 60 (launched 3 February 1732 at Cadiz) - BU 1750
  • Galicia class, 70 guns
    • Galicia 70 (launched 26 April 1730 at Grana Shipyard, Ferrol) - Scuttled 5 April 1741, captured and raised by Britain, renamed Galicia Prize, scuttled 1742(?)
    • Leon 70 (launched 19 August 1731 at Grana Shipyard, Ferrol) - taken to pieces in 1747 or 1749.
  • Conquistador 62 (launched 9 November 1730 at Havana) - Scuttled 5 April 1741
  • Príncipe class, 70 guns
    • Princesa 70 (launched 17 August 1731 at Guarnizo) - Captured by Britain 19 April 1740, renamed Princessa, sold 1784
    • Príncipe 70 (launched 17 August 1731 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 11 July 1746
  • Genovés 54 (Acquired 1730) - Wrecked 1740
  • Carmen 64 (1730) - BU 1764
  • Fama Volante 52 (Acquired 1730 at Genoa) - Stricken 1740
  • León 70 (launched 27 August 1731 at Ferrol) - Stricken 1749
  • Guipúzcoa 60/64 (launched 19 August 1731 at Pasajes) - Wrecked 1741
  • Galga 56 (1731) - Wrecked 1750
  • Real Felipe 112 (launched 1732 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 1750
  • San Isidro 62 (launched 1732 at Guarnizo) - Scuttled March 1742
  • Constante (San Cristobal) 64/66 (launched 1732 at Havana) - Sold 1746
  • África class, 60 guns
    • África (San Jose) 60 (launched 13 April 1733) - Scuttled 1741
    • Europa (Nuestra Señora del Pilar) 60 (launched May 1734 at Havana) - Scuttled 1762
    • Asia (Nuestra Señora de Loreto) 60 (launched 18 December 1735 at Havana) - Stricken 1746
    • América (Nuestra Señora de Bethlehen) 60 (launched 21 January 1736 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 1762, released?
  • Nueva España 70 (launched 1 March 1734 at Quatzalcoalcos) - Sold 1752
  • Esperanza 50 (launched 21 December 1735 at Havana) - Stricken 1747
  • Dragón (Santa Rosa de Lima) 64 (launched 28 June 1737 at Havana) - Scuttled 5 April 1741
  • Castilla (Santo Cristo de Burgos) 60 (launched 13 June 1737 at Havana) - Wrecked 1747
  • 'Invencible Class 70 guns
    • Invencible (San Ignacio) 70 (launched 4 November 1739 at Havana) - Burnt 1741
    • Glorioso (Nuestra Señora de Belen) 70 (launched 1739 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 19 October 1747
  • Bizarra (Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe) 50 (launched 13 March 1739 at Havana) - Sold 23 March 1759 at Havana
  • Poder 66 (Acquired 1740) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Toulon, 1744, recaptured and scuttled, 1744
  • Soberbio 66 (Acquired 1740) - Sold 1746
  • Brillante 66 (Acquired 1740) - Sold 1746
  • Neptuno 66 (Acquired 1740) - Sold 1748
  • Halcón 60 (Acquired 1740) - Sold 1748
  • Oriente 64 (Acquired 1740) - Sold 1746
  • Ave de Gracia 50 (Acquired 1742) - Sold 1744
  • Reina class, 70 guns
    • Reina 70 (launched 27 May 1743 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 1762, same name, sold 1775
    • Invencible (San Jose) 70 (launched 19 December 1743 at Havana) - Burnt 1750
  • San Felipe 70 (launched 23 December 1743 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 14 January 1762
  • Conquistador class, 70 guns
    • Conquistador (Jesus, Maria y José) 64 (launched 28 January 1745 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 1748
    • Dragón 60 (launched 2 May 1745 at Havana) - Wrecked 29 May 1783
  • África class, 70 guns
    • África (San Francisco de Asis) 70 (launched 17 August 1746 at Havana) - Scuttled 1748
    • Vencedor (Santo Tomas) 70 (launched 22 December 1746 at Havana) - Burnt 1750
    • Tigre (San Lorenzo) 70/74 (launched 17 December 1747 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, same name, sold 1784
  • Rayo class, both ordered 1 July 1847 at Havana
  • Princesa class, ordered 1847-48 at Havana
    • Princesa (Santa Barbara) 74 (launched 15 September 1750 at Havana) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Santa Maria, 16 January 1780, renamed HMS Princessa, BU 1809
    • Infante (San Luis Gonzaga) 70/74 (launched 20 June 1750 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, renamed HMS Infanta, sold 1775
    • Galicia (Santiago el Mayor) 70/74 (launched 3 August 1750 at Havana) - Stricken 1797

The English phase - 1750 to 1769

Note that surviving 68-gun ships were re-rated as 70 guns at end 1766 and as 74-gun ships in 1793.

  • San Fernando class
    • San Fernando 64 (launched 1751 at Ferrol) - Wrecked 3 January 1769
    • Castilla 64 (launched 1751 at Ferrol) - wrecked 1771
    • Asia 64 (launched 17 March 1752 at Ferrol) - Scuttled 11 June 1762
  • Septentrion 64 (launched 26 December 1751 at Cartagena) - Wrecked 1783
  • África class all ordered 1751-57 at Cadiz (Carraca Dyd), 68 guns
    • África 68 (launched 20 November 1752 at Cadiz) - stricken 8 August 1806 and BU 1809
    • Firme 68 (launched 22 June 1754 at Cadiz) - Captured by Britain 22 July 1805, retaining same name, BU 1814
    • Aquiles 68 (launched 5 September 1754 at Cadiz) - Stricken 7 August 1790
    • España 68 (launched 1 June 1757 at Cádiz) - Stricken to BU 12 December 1807
  • Eolo class all ordered 1752 at Ferrol (Esteiro Dyd), 68 guns
    • Eolo (San Juan de Dios) 68 (launched 1753 at Ferrol) - Stricken 20 March 1864
    • Oriente (San Diego de Alcala) 68 (launched 15 August 1753 at Ferrol) - Stricken 27 September 1806
    • Aquilón (San Dámaso) 68 (launched 10 March 1754 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, retaining same name, later renamed HMS Moro, BU 1770
    • Neptuno (San Justo) 68 (launched 6 July 1754 at Ferrol) - Scuttled 11 August 1762
    • Magnánimo (San Pastor) 68 (launched 30 November 1754 at Ferrol) - Wrecked 12 July 1794
    • Gallardo (San Juan de Sahagún) 68 (launched 18 October 1754 at Ferrol) - Scuttled 16 February 1797
    • Brillante (San Dionisio) 68 (launched 20 August 1754 at Ferrol) - Burnt 10 October 1790
    • Vencedor (San Julian) 68 (launched 11 June 1755 at Ferrol) - transferred to France 1806, renamed Argonaute, captured by Spain 1808, renamed Vencedor, wrecked 1810
    • Glorioso (San Francisco Javier) 74 (launched 29 January 1755 at Ferrol) - stricken 5 May 1818 to BU
    • Guerrero (San Raimundo) 68 (launched 27 March 1755 at Ferrol) - BU 1844
    • Soberano (San Gregorio) 68 (launched 9 August 1755 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, retaining same name, BU 1770
    • Héctor (San Bernardo) 68 (launched 22 September 1755 at Ferrol) - stricken 11 June 1768 and BU 1790
  • Serio class, all ordered April 1852 at Guarnizo
    • Serio 68 (launched December 1753 at Guarnizo) - BU 1805
    • Poderoso 68 (launched January 1754 at Guarnizo) - Wrecked 1779
    • Soberbio 68 (launched March 1754 at Guarnizo) - Stricken 23 June 1764
    • Arrogante 68 (launched March 1754 at Guarnizo) - Scuttled 16 February 1797
    • Hércules 68 (launched 1755 or 56 at Guarnizo) - stricken 4 July 1761
    • Contento 68 (launched 1756 at Guarnizo) - stricken 6 October 1761
  • Tridente 64 (launched 15 July 1754 at Cartagena) - Stricken 1771
  • Terrible class both ordered 1754 at Cartagena, 68 guns
    • Terrible 68 (launched 10 November 1754 at Cartagena) - Stricken 1811
    • Atlante 68 (launched 21 December 1754 at Cartagena) - transferred to France 22 September 1801, renamed Atlas 1803, captured by Spain 1808, same name, BU 1817
  • Arrogante 74 (-) - Burnt on stocks at Ferrol, 1754
  • Triunfante class all ordered 1752-54 at Ferrol (Esteiro Dyd), 68 guns
    • Triunfante 68 (launched 1 February 1756 at Ferrol) - Wrecked 5 January 1795
    • Dichoso 68 (launched 18 March 1756 at Ferrol) - Stricken 15 October 1784
    • Monarca 68 (launched 13 June 1756 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Santa Maria, 1780, retaining same name, sold 1791
    • Diligente 68 (launched 25 September 1756 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Santa Maria, 1780, renamed HMS Diligence, BU 1784
  • Peruano 50 (launched 1757 at Guayaquil) - Sold 26 January1790
  • Campeón 60 (launched 27 January 1758 at Ferrol) - Hulked 1778, BU 1824
  • Conquistador 60 (launched 29 July 1758 at Cádiz) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, retaining same name, stricken 1782
  • Astuto (San Eustaquio) 58/60 (launched 10 April 1759 at Havana) - BU 1810
  • Príncipe Class 68 guns
    • Príncipe 74 (launched 23 December 1759 at Guarnizo) - Sold 15 May 1776
    • Victorioso 74 (launched early 1760 at Guarnizo) - Sold 15 May 1776
  • San Carlos Class, 80 guns
      • San Carlos 80 (-) - Destroyed on stocks at Havana, 1762
  • Santiago 80 (-) - Destroyed on stocks at Havana, 1762
  • Buen Consejo 60 (purchased 18 November 1761 at Genoa) - stricken 8 July 1762
  • San Genaro 60 (launched 27 October 1761 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, retaining same name, lost 1763
  • San Antonio 60 (launched 17 December 1761 at Havana) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, retaining same name, sold 1775
  • Velasco class all ordered 1762-64 at Cartagena, 68/70 guns
    • Velasco 68 (launched 18 August 1764 at Cartagena) - stricken 4 September 1796
    • San Genaro 68 (launched 23 December 1765 at Cartagena) - transferred to France on 24 July 1801, renamed Ulysse, later renamed Tourville, stricken 1822
    • Santa Isabel 70 (launched 30 April 1767 at Cartagena) - BU 1803
  • San Vicente Ferrer Class 80 guns.
    • San Vicente Ferrer 80 (launched 23 April 1768 at Cartagena) - Scuttled 16 February 1797
    • San Nicolás Bari 80 (launched 5 April 1769 at Cartagena) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, renamed HMS San Nicholas, sold 1814
    • San Rafael 80 (-) - Destroyed by fire on stocks at Havana 1769
  • San Carlos class. Built (all at Havana) as 80-gun (Third Rate) ships, with a length of 197 Burgos feet (180 British feet), these ships were later reconstructed as 94-gun Second Rates, and in the case of the San Carlos, as a First Rate (three-decker) of 112 guns.
    • San Carlos 80 (launched 30 April 1765) - Converted to 112-gun 3-decker in 1801, BU 1819
    • San Fernando 80 (launched 29 July 1765) - Stricken 8 October 1813 and sold 1815
    • San Luis 80 (launched 30 September 1767) - Stricken 4 August 1789 and BU
  • América (or Santiago) 64 (launched 7 August 1766 at Havana) - BU 1823
  • San Juan Nepomuceno class all ordered 1763-67 at Guarnizo, 70 guns
  • San Isidro class both ordered 1766 at Ferrol (Esteiro Dyd), 70 guns
    • San Isidro 70 (launched 2 May 1768 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, sold 1814
    • San Julián 70 (launched 10 December 1768 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain and recaptured at the Battle of Cape Santa Maria, 1780, wrecked 1780
  • San Francisco de Paula class ordered 1766 at Havana, 70 guns
    • San Francisco de Paula 70 (launched 12 January 1769 at Havana) - Burned 1784
    • San José 70 (launched 14 December 1769 at Havana) - Wrecked 8 April 1780
  • San Rafael 80 (launched 8 August 1771 at Havana) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape Finisterre, 22 July 1805, retaining same name, sold 1810
  • Nuestra Señora de la Santísima Trinidad 112, later 120 (1769) - Converted to 144-gun 4-decker in 1796, reduced to 136, captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar, 1805, sank the next day[5]

The Second French phase - 1770 to 1782

  • San Pedro Apóstol class
    • San Pedro Apóstol 74 (launched 31 December 1770 at Ferrol) - Stricken 1801
    • San Pablo 74 (launched 15 March 1771 at Ferrol) - Renamed Soberano 1814, BU January 1856
    • San Gabriel 74 (launched 5 March 1772 at Ferrol) - Stricken 10 August 1909
  • San Joaquín class
    • San Joaquín (originally begun as San Pedro de Alcántara) 74 (launched 14 June 1771 at Cartagena) - BU 1817
    • San Juan Bautista 74 (launched 1 August 1772 at Cartagena) - Stricken 5 April 1809
    • Ángel de la Guarda 74 (launched 18 September 1773 at Cartagena) - BU 1810
    • San Dámaso 74 (launched 30 March 1776 at Cartagena) - Scuttled 16 February 1797, captured by Britain and refloated, sold 1814
  • San Miguel 74 (launched January 1774 at Havana) - Stranded and captured by Britain 11 October 1782, retaining same name, sold 1791
  • San Ramón 68 (launched 6 April 1775 at Havana) - Aground in storm and burnt by the French 1810
  • San Eugenio 80 (launched 29 June 1775 at Ferrol) - BU 1804
  • San Isidoro 64 (ex-Neapolitan, transferred 1776) - Wrecked 26 October 1794
  • San Leandro 64 (ex-Neapolitan, transferred 1776) - Sold 1784
  • Purísima Concepción class
  • Miño 54 (launched 1 February 1779 at Ferrol) - BU 1814
  • Castilla (or San Félix) 64 (launched 1 February 1779 at Ferrol) - Aground in storm & burnt by the French 1810
  • San Justo 74 (launched 11 November 1779 at Cartagena) - BU 1824[6] or 1828
  • Santo Domingo Class 60 guns
    • Santo Domingo 60 (launched 26 January 1781 at Ferrol) - BU 1807
    • San Felipe Apostol 60 (launched 22 June 1781 at Ferrol) - Sold to the Netherlands on 8 July 1794, renamed Overijssel, captured by Britain 1795, retaining same name, sold 1822
  • San Julián 60 (launched 31 August 1781 at Cartagena) - BU 1830
  • San Fermín 74 (launched 29 March 1782 at Pasajes) - BU 1808
  • San Sebastián 74 (launched 1783 at Pasajes) - transferred to France in May 1799, renamed Alliance, stricken 1807

[Note that the Guipuzcoano 64 - captured by the United Kingdom in 1780 and renamed Prince William - was a private ship of the Real Compañía Guipuzcoana de Caracas, and was not part of the Spanish Navy.]

The Period of Spanish Consolidation - 1782 to 1807

  • Santa Ana class (also called los Meregildos)
    • Santa Ana 112 (launched 29 September 1784 at Ferrol) - Stricken 1812[7]
    • Mejicano (San Hipólito) 112 (launched 20 January 1786 at Havana) - Stricken 8 October 1813 and sold 1815
    • Conde de Regla 112 (launched 4 November 1786 at Havana) - Strricken 14 July 1810 and BU 1811
    • Salvador del Mundo 112 (launched 2 May 1787 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, retaining same name, BU 1815
    • Real Carlos 112 (launched 4 November 1787 at Havana) - Blew up in action, 12 July 1801
    • San Hermenegildo 112 (launched 20 January 1789 at Havana) - Blew up in action, 12 July 1801
    • Reina Luisa 112 (launched 12 September 1791 at Ferrol) - Renamed Fernando VII 1809, wrecked 9 December 1815
    • Príncipe de Asturias 112 (launched 28 January 1794 at Havana) - Stricken 1812,[8] BU 1814
  • Bahama 74 (launched 11 March 1784 at Havana) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805, retaining same name, BU 1814[9]
  • San Antonio 74 (launched 16 July 1785 at Cartagena) - transferred to France on 21 March 1801, renamed Saint Antoine, captured by Britain 1801, renamed San Antonio, sold 1828
  • San Ildefonso class 74 guns - designed by Romero y Landa
    • San Ildefonso 74 (launched 22 January 1785 at Cartagena) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805, retaining same name, BU 1816[10]
    • San Telmo 74 (launched 20 June 1788 at Ferrol) - Lost off Cape Horn 1819
    • San Francisco de Paula 74 (launched 20 December 1788 at Cartagena) - BU 1823
    • Europa 74 (launched 19 October 1789 at Ferrol) - Stricken 1801
    • Intrépido 74 (launched 20 November 1790 at Ferrol) - transferred to France 1 July 1801, renamed Intrépide, captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar and sank in storm, 1805
    • Conquistador 74 (launched 9 December 1791 at Cartagena) - transferred to France 23 April 1802, renamed Conquérant, stricken 1804
    • Infante Don Pelayo 74 (launched 22 November 1792 at Havana) - transferred to France 23 April 1802, renamed Desaix, stricken 1804
    • Monarca 74 (launched 17 March 1794 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar and wrecked in storm, 23 October 1805[11]
  • San Fulgencio Class 60 guns, designed by Romero y Landa as "reduced" version of his 74-gun San Ildefonso class.
    • San Fulgencio 60 (aunched 3 November 1787 at Cartagena) - Foundered 1814 at Havana
    • San Leandro 60 (launched 27 November 1787 at Ferrol) - Wrecked 1814[12]
    • San Pedro Alcántara 64 (launched 27 June 1788 at Havana) - Burned 24 April 1815
  • Asia 68 (launched 9 December 1789 at Havana) - crew mutinied and handed ship over to Mexico 1825, becoming Mexican Congreso Mexicano; BU 1830
  • Soberano 74 (launched 25 August 1790 at Havana) - BU 1809
  • Le Ferme 74 (1785, ex-French Phocion, defected 1793, ex-La Ferme, renamed 1792) - Stricken 1808
  • Montañés class. Two were ordered at Ferrol in late 1792 and the third in November 1795. Although the first of these ships was rated at 74 guns and the other two at 80 guns, all three were built to the same design (by Julian Retamosa) and each actually carried 80 guns.
  • Censeur 74 (1782, ex-French, transferred 1799) - BU
  • Argonauta 74 (1789, ex-French Argonaute, transferred 1808) - Wrecked 1810
  • Héroe 80 (1801, ex-French Heros, captured 1808 at Cadiz) - Stricken 1839
  • Algeciras 80 (1804, ex-French Algésiras, captured 1808 at Cadiz) - Stricken 1826
  • Neptuno 80 (1803, ex-French Neptune, captured 1808 at Cadiz) - BU 1820
  • Plutón 74 (1805, ex-French Pluton, captured 1808 at Cadiz) - Renamed Montañés, BU 1816
  • Emprendedor 86 (-) - BU 1808 or later (never completed)
  • Tridente 76 (-) - BU 1808 or later (never completed)
  • Real Familia 114 (-) - BU 1808 or later (never completed)

The Final phase - 1808 to 1854

Spain built no further ships of the line after 1808 for nearly half a century, although five 74-gun ships were acquired from Russia. Finally, two 86-gun ships were ordered in 1850 and laid down on 19 November and 2 December 1850 respectively.

  • Fernando VII 74 (1813, ex-Russian Neptunus, sold 1818) - Stricken 1823
  • Alejandro I 74 (1813, ex-Russian Drezden, sold 1818) - Stricken 1823
  • Numancia I 74 (1813, ex-Russian Liubek, sold 1818) - BU 1823
  • España 74 (1811, ex-Russian Nord-Adler, sold 1818) - Stricken 1821
  • Velasco 74 (1810, ex-Russian Tri Sviatitelei, sold 1818) - Stricken 1821
  • Reina Doña Isabel II 86 (launched 13 October 1852 at Carraca) - stricken 18 July 1867 but still extant 1885, BU
  • Rey Don Francisco de Asís 86 (launched 18 September 1854 at Ferrol) - Decommissioned 1876, BU

References

  1. ^ p208-9, 217-8, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  2. ^ p208-9, 230-2, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  3. ^ p208-9, 227, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  4. ^ p208-9, 226-7, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  5. ^ p208-212, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  6. ^ p208-9, 232-3, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  7. ^ p208-9, 214-7, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  8. ^ p208-9, 212-4, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  9. ^ p208-9, 23-5, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  10. ^ p208-9, 228-30, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  11. ^ p208-9, 225-6, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  12. ^ p208-9, 233-4, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  13. ^ p208-9, 220-1, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  14. ^ p208-9, 222-3, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  15. ^ p208-9, 219-20, Goodwin The Ships of Trafalgar, the British, French and Spanish Fleets October 1805
  • Harbron, John, Trafalgar and the Spanish navy (1988) ISBN 0-87021-695-3
  • García-Torralba Pérez, Enrique, Navíos de la Real Armada 1700-1860 (2014) ISBN 978-84-939303-4-9

See also

Media related to Ships of the line of Spain at Wikimedia Commons

Dalupaon, Camarines Sur

Dalupaon is the second largest barangay in the town of Pasacao, Camarines Sur, Philippines. According to the 2006 census, it has a population of 3,901 people in 615 households.

Both Dalupaon Elementary School and Dalupaon National High School are located in the village.

Dalupaon is known for hosting the shipyard of two Spanish galleons named Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe and Ángel de la Guarda. These two are among the List of ships of the line of Spain.

Dalupaon Elementary School

The Dalupaon Elementary School (DES) is a government primary school in Pasacao Town, Philippines. It was founded in 1966 at Barangay Dalupaon.

The Dalupians is the official primary student publication of the Dalupaon Elementary School.

This historical school is known for keeping the remnants of a huge sawmill, which was called "Camarin" by Spaniards and natives of Dalupaon. This was used by Spaniards in constructing two galleons during the governorship of Juan de Silva (1609-1926) that were named Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe and Ángel de la Guarda. These two are among the List of ships of the line of Spain.

List of Spanish sail frigates

This is a list of Spanish sail frigates built or acquired during the period 1710-1854

Spanish frigates generally had religious names, often the names of saints or "our Lady". Those with primarily secular names (such as royal, geographical or adjectival names) usually had additionally a religious name (Avocación or alias), which is listed below in the second column where known.

An asterisk (*) in the "Launch date" column indicates the date of acquisition (purchase or capture) for vessels not built for the Spanish Navy.

List of battleships of Spain

In the latter half of the 19th century, the Spanish Navy had built a series of ironclad warships that culminated in the barbette ship Pelayo in the 1880s. Following the destruction of much of the Spanish fleet in the Spanish–American War in 1898, Spain slowly began to rebuild its navy. In the early 20th century, the Spanish Navy built three battleships and planned several more; the three ships that were completed were the vessels of the España class. These ships were the smallest dreadnought-type battleships ever built. A further three ships of the Reina Victoria Eugenia class were authorized by the Navy Law of 1913, but the outbreak of World War I prevented these ships from being built, as Spain was heavily dependent on Great Britain for material and technical expertise. The three completed battleships all served in the Rif War in North Africa, where the lead ship, España, ran aground and was wrecked.

Following the end of the First World War, occasional plans for the construction of new battleships were proposed, including a small design deriving from Britain's powerful Nelson-class battleships. However, nothing had come of these efforts by the time of the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War. Following the victory of Francisco Franco's Nationalists in that conflict, in which both of the surviving Spanish battleships—one serving on the side of the Nationalists, the other on that of the Republicans—had been destroyed, proposals for the construction of four fast battleships to an Italian design, as well as the construction of "large cruisers" - the only battlecruiser designs proposed for or by Spain - were made. However, the outbreak of the Second World War resulted in these plans being disrupted.

List of ship launches in 1668

The list of ship launches in 1668 includes a chronological list of some ships launched in 1668.

Outline of Spain

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Spain:

Spain – sovereign state located on the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe. Spanish territory also includes the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean, the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean off the African coast, three exclaves in North Africa, Ceuta, Melilla, and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera that border Morocco, and the islands and peñones (rocks) of Alborán, Chafarinas, Alhucemas, and Perejil. Spain is a democracy organized in the form of a parliamentary government under a constitutional monarchy. It is a developed country with the 13th largest economy in the world. It is a member of the European Union, United Nations, NATO, OECD, WTO and many other international organizations.

San Telmo (ship)

San Telmo ("Saint Peter Gonzalez" or "Saint Erasmus of Formiae") was a Spanish 74-gun ship of the line, launched in 1788.

In 1819 the San Telmo commanded by Captain Joaquín de Toledo y Parra was the flagship of a Spanish naval squadron under Brigadier Rosendo Porlier y Asteguieta bound for Callao (Peru) to reinforce colonial forces there fighting the independence movements in Spanish America. Damaged by severe weather in the Drake Passage, south of Cape Horn, it sank in September 1819.

The 644 officers, soldiers and seamen lost on board the San Telmo were the first known people to die in Antarctica, as parts of her wreckage were found months later by the early sealers visiting Livingston Island. Indeed, if somebody of the San Telmo survived to set foot there they would have been the first known person in history to reach Antarctica.

San Telmo Island off the north coast of Livingston Island is named after the ship.

Ship of the line

A ship of the line was a type of naval warship constructed from the 17th through to the mid-19th century. The ship of the line was designed for the naval tactic known as the line of battle, which depended on the two columns of opposing warships maneuvering to fire with the cannons along their broadsides. In conflicts where opposing ships were both able to fire from their broadsides, the side with more cannons, and therefore more firepower typically had an advantage. Since these engagements were almost invariably won by the heaviest ships carrying the most powerful guns, the natural progression was to build sailing vessels that were the largest and most powerful of their time.From the end of the 1840s, the introduction of steam power brought less dependence on the wind in battle and led to the construction of screw-driven, wooden-hulled, ships of the line; a number of pure sail-driven ships were converted to this propulsion mechanism. However, the introduction of the ironclad frigate in about 1859 led swiftly to the decline of the steam-assisted ships of the line. The ironclad warship became the ancestor of the 20th-century battleship, whose very designation is itself a contraction of the phrase "ship of the line of battle" or, more colloquially, "line-of-battle ship".

The term "ship of the line" has fallen into disuse except in historical contexts, after warships and naval tactics evolved and changed from the mid 19th century.

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