List of rulers of Morocco

This is the list of rulers of Morocco, since the establishment of the first Moroccan state in 789. The common and formal titles of these rulers has varied, depending on the time period. Since 1957, the designation King has been used.

King of Morocco
ملك المغرب
Royal standard of Morocco
Royal standard of Morocco
Incumbent
King Mohammed VI
Mohammed VI
since 23 July 1999
Details
StyleHis Majesty
Heir apparentPrince Moulay Hassan
First monarch
Formation
  • 789 (Idrisid dynasty)
  • 1666 (Alaouite dynasty)
ResidenceDar al-Makhzen, Rabat

Idrisid dynasty

The first period of Fatimid overlordship lasted from 922 to 925.

The second period of Fatimid overlordship lasted from 927 to 937.

In 974, the Sultan Al-Hasan ben Kannun was defeated by Cordobese Umayyads. A period of Umayyad overlordship followed then.

Almoravid dynasty

Almohad uprising started in 1145

Almohad dynasty

Marinid overlordship, from 1248 until the fall of the Almohads in 1269

  • Umar (1248–1266) - based in Marrakech, with local power only
  • Idris II (1266–1269) - in Marrakech, with local power only

Marinid dynasty

Idrisid interlude

  • Muhammad ibn Ali Idrisi-Joutey (1465–1471)

Wattasid dynasty

Saadi dynasty

1603–1627: Succession war

Main Saadian rulers, based in Marrakesh:

Splinter faction based in Fes, with only local power:

1627–1659: Reunified rule

Dila'i interlude

Alaouite dynasty

1666–1957: Alaouite sultans of Morocco

NameLifespanReign startReign endNotesFamilyImage
Al-Rashid1631 – 9 April 1672
(aged 41)
16669 April 1672Son of Moulay SharifAlaouiteMulay al-Rashid
Ismail Ibn Sharif1634/1645 – 22 March 1727
(aged 93–82)
167222 March 1727Son of Moulay SharifAlaouiteMulay Ismail
Abu'l Abbas Ahmad
(1st reign)
1677 – 5 March 1729
(aged 52)
22 March 1727March 1728
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abdalmalik1696 – 2 March 1729
(aged 33)
March 1728July 1728
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abu'l Abbas Ahmad
(2nd reign)
1677 – 5 March 1729
(aged 52)
July 17285 March 1729Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abdallah
(1st reign)
1678 – 10 November 1757
(aged 79)
5 March 172928 September 1734
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
AliDied April 173728 September 173414 February 1736
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abdallah
(2nd reign)
1678 – 10 November 1757
(aged 79)
14 February 17368 August 1736
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Mohammed IIBorn 16948 August 173618 June 1738
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Al-Mostadi
(1st reign)
Died 175918 June 1738February 1740
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abdallah
(3rd reign)
1678 – 10 November 1757
(aged 79)
February 174013 June 1741
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Zin al-Abidin1692 – 1762
(aged 70)
13 June 174124 November 1741
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abdallah
(4th reign)
1678 – 10 November 1757
(aged 79)
24 November 17413 February 1742
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Al-Mostadi
(2nd reign)
Died 17593 February 1742May 1743
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abdallah
(5th reign)
1678 – 10 November 1757
(aged 79)
May 1743July 1747
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Al-Mostadi
(3rd reign)
Died 1759July 1747October 1748
(deposed)
Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Abdallah
(6th reign)
1678 – 10 November 1757
(aged 79)
October 174810 November 1757Son of Ismail Ibn SharifAlaouiteSin foto
Mohammed III1710 – 9 April 1790
(aged 80)
10 November 17579 April 1790Son of AbdallahAlaouiteSin foto
Yazid1750 – 23 February 1792
(aged 42)
9 April 179023 February 1792Son of Mohammed IIIAlaouiteSin foto
Slimane1760 – 28 November 1822
(aged 62)
23 February 179228 November 1822Son of Mohammed IIIAlaouiteSin foto
Abd al-Rahman1778 – 24 August 1859
(aged 81)
28 November 182224 August 1859Nephew of SlimaneAlaouiteAbderrahman Ben Hicham
Mohammed IV1802 – 16 September 1873
(aged 71)
24 August 185916 September 1873Son of Abd al-RahmanAlaouiteSin foto
Hassan I1836 – 7 June 1894
(aged 58)
16 September 18737 June 1894Son of Mohammed IVAlaouiteHassan I of Morocco
Abdelaziz24 February 1878 – 10 June 1943 (aged 65)7 June 18944 January 1908
(deposed)
Son of Hassan IAlaouiteAbd-el-aziz
Abdelhafid24 February 1876 – 4 April 1937 (aged 61)4 January 190812 August 1912
(abdicated)
Son of Hassan IAlaouiteAbdelhafid
Yusef1882 – 17 November 1927
(aged 45)
13 August 191217 November 1927Son of Hassan IAlaouiteYoucef ben hassan
Mohammed V
(1st reign)
10 August 1909 – 26 February 1961 (aged 51)17 November 192720 August 1953
(deposed)
Son of YusefAlaouiteMohammed V
Mohammed Ben Aarafa1889 – 17 July 1976
(aged 87)
20 August 195330 October 1955
(abdicated)
Distant relative of Mohammed VAlaouiteSin foto
Mohammed V
(2nd reign)
10 August 1909 – 26 February 1961 (aged 51)16 November 195514 August 1957
(proclaimed King of Morocco)
Son of YusefAlaouiteMohammed V

1957–Present: Alaouite kings of Morocco

NameLifespanReign startReign endNotesFamilyImage
Mohammed V
  • محمد الخامس
10 August 1909 – 26 February 1961 (aged 51)14 August 195726 February 1961Son of YusefAlaouiteMohammed V
Hassan II
  • الحسن الثاني
9 July 1929 – 23 July 1999 (aged 70)26 February 196123 July 1999Son of Mohammed VAlaouiteKing Hassan II
Mohammed VI
  • محمد السادس
21 August 1963 (age 55)23 July 1999IncumbentSon of Hassan IIAlaouiteKing Mohammed VI

Royal Standard

Royal standard of Morocco

Royal Standard of Morocco.

See also

External links

Abdallah al-Ghalib

Abdallah al-Ghalib Billah (1517 – 22 January 1574, reigned 1557–74) was the second Saadian sultan of Morocco. He succeeded his father Mohammed ash-Sheikh as Sultan of Morocco.

With his first wife, Mohammed ash-Sheikh had three sons, but the two oldest had died while he was still alive (in 1550 and in 1551). Abdallah, the third, was 40 years old when he became sultan and received the name al-Ghalib Billah. Before that he had been vice-king of Marrakesh and governor of Fes.

Shortly after Abdallah came to power, three of his younger brothers fled the country and joined the Ottoman Turks. Abd al-Malik and Ahmad, both future Sultans of Morocco, spent 17 years in exile in the Ottoman Empire, moving between Algiers and Constantinople, where they were trained by the Ottomans.During a relatively peaceful reign Abdallah succeeded in warding off both the Spanish and the Turks and in consolidating the sovereignty of the Saadians over Morocco.

He fought the invading Turks in 1558 at the Battle of Wadi al-Laban, the Ottomans had to retreat because the Spaniard were launching an expedition on Oran. The Moroccan ruler formed an alliance with the Spanish against the Ottomans. After his victory he even occupied Tlemcen for a short period. The Spaniard, and the Moroccans were destroyed at the expedition of Mostaganem in 1558 by the Ottomans. In 1568 he supported the insurrection of the Moriscos in Spain.

Abdallah al-Ghalib Billah died on 22 January 1574 of an asthma attack. After his reign a period of civil war was to follow that lasted four years.

During his reign, Abdallah al-Ghalib Billah resided in Marrakesh. He had the Muassin mosque constructed in the city, along with a maristan (a hospital usually attached to a mosque) and the Ben Youssef Medrassa. He also reconstructed the al-Mansouria mosque.

He was succeeded by his son Abdallah Mohammed, despite a Saadian inheritance rule that decreed that the throne pass on to his eldest surviving brother, the exiled Abd al-Malik.

Abu Abdallah Mohammed II Saadi

Abu Abdallah Mohammed II, Al-Mutawakkil, often simply Abdallah Mohammed (died 4 August 1578) was Sultan of Morocco from 1574 to 1576. He was the oldest son of Abdallah al-Ghalib and became Sultan after his father's death.

Immediately after his accession to the throne he had one of his brothers executed and another (Mulay en-Naser, the governor of Tadla) imprisoned.

Abu Abdallah's uncle Abd al-Malik, who was like Abdallah al-Ghalib a son of Mohammed ash-Sheikh, had already fled to Constantinople in the Ottoman Empire in 1574. Back in Ottoman Algeria, Abd al-Malik succeeded in organising his own army, consisting of Ottoman soldiers, and in 1576 he invaded Morocco and conquered Fez from his nephew, in the Capture of Fez. The first battle was in al-Rukn in the lands of Banu waritin, near Fez. In a second battle near Salé (Rabat) in Jandaq al-Rayhan, Abd al-Malik also defeated his nephew. A third battle, also won by Abd al-Malik, took place in Taroudannt.

Both Abd al-Malik and Abu Abdallah died two years later in the Battle of Alcácer Quibir, in 1578. In that battle, Abu Abdallah fought his last battle against his uncle Abd al-Malik with the help of his Portuguese allies.

Abu Marwan Abd al-Malik I Saadi

Abu Marwan Abd al-Malik I (Arabic: أبو مروان عبد الملك الغازي‎), often simply Abd al-Malik or Mulay Abdelmalek (died 4 August 1578), was the Saadi Sultan of Morocco from 1576 until his death right after the Battle of Ksar El Kebir against Portugal in 1578.

Alaouite dynasty

The Alaouite dynasty, or Alawite dynasty (Arabic: سلالة العلويين الفيلاليين‎, Sulālat al-ʿAlawiyyīn al-Fīlālīyn), is the current Moroccan royal family. The name Alaouite comes from the ‘Alī of ‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib, Muhammad's son-in-law and cousin, whose descendant Sharif ibn Ali became Prince of Tafilalt in 1631. His son Mulay Al-Rashid (1664–1672) was able to unite and pacify the country. The Alaouite family claim descent from the Islamic prophet Muhammad, through his daughter Fāṭimah az-Zahrah and her husband ‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib.

Line of succession to the Moroccan throne

According to Article 20 of the Constitution, the crown of Morocco passes according to agnatic primogeniture among the descendants of King Hassan II – unless the reigning monarch designates a younger son as heir apparent – failing which it devolves to "the closest male in the collateral consanguinity".

List of ambassadors of China to Morocco

The Chinese ambassador in Rabat is the official representative of the Government in Beijing to the Government of Morocco.

List of ambassadors of Iran to Morocco

The Iranian ambassador in Rabat was the official representative of the Government in Tehran to the Government of Morocco.

Direction of the Embassy:

Ambassade Imperiale de l'Iran 7 Rue Al-Qassar

Interest Section: Avenue Bir Kacem

List of ambassadors of Morocco to China

The Moroccan ambassador in Beijing is the official representative of the Government in Rabat to the Government of the People's Republic of China.

List of ambassadors of Morocco to Russia

The Moroccan ambassador in Moscow is the official representative of the Government in Rabat to the Government of Russia.

He is concurrently accredited in Astana (Kazakhstan) and Minsk (Belarus).

List of ambassadors of Morocco to Saudi Arabia

The Moroccan ambassador in Riyadh is the official representative of the Government in Rabat to the Government of Saudi Arabia.

List of heads of government of Morocco

This is a list of heads of government of Morocco since the formation of the post of President of the Government of Morocco in 1955, to the present day.

A total of sixteen people have served as President of the Government of Morocco (not counting two periods of direct rule by the King of Morocco). Additionally, one person, Mohammed Karim Lamrani, has served on three non-consecutive occasions.

Mohammed Karim Lamrani died in 2018.

List of kingdoms and royal dynasties

Monarchism is a movement that supports the monarchy as a form of government.

Lists of office-holders

These are lists of incumbents (individuals holding offices or positions), including heads of states or of subnational entities.

A historical discipline, archontology, focuses on the study of past and current office holders.

Incumbents may also be found in the countries' articles (main article and "Politics of") and the list of national leaders, recent changes in 2007 in politics, and past leaders on State leaders by year and Colonial governors by year.

Various articles group lists by title, function or topic: e.g. abdication, assassinated persons, cabinet (government), chancellor, ex-monarchs (20th century), head of government, head of state, lieutenant governor, mayor, military commanders, minister (and ministers by portfolio below), order of precedence, peerage, president, prime minister, Reichstag participants (1792), Secretary of State.

Wattasid dynasty

The Wattasid dynasty (Berber languages: ⵉⵡⴻⵟⵟⴰⵙⴻⵏ, Iweṭṭasen; Arabic: الوطاسيون‎, al-waṭṭāsīyūn) was a ruling dynasty of Morocco. Like the Marinid dynasty, its rulers were of Zenata Berber descent. The two families were related, and the Marinids recruited many viziers from the Wattasids. These viziers assumed the powers of the Sultans, seizing control of the Marinid dynasty's realm when the last Marinid, Abu Muhammad Abd al-Haqq, who had massacred many of the Wattasids in 1459, was murdered during a popular revolt in Fez in 1465.

Abu Abd Allah al-Sheikh Muhammad ibn Yahya was the first Sultan of the Wattasid Dynasty. He controlled only the northern part of Morocco, the south being divided into several principalities. The Wattasids were finally supplanted in 1554, after the Battle of Tadla, by the Saadi dynasty princes of Tagmadert who had ruled all of southern Morocco since 1511.

History
Geography
Politics
Economy
Culture
Rulers of Morocco
Idrisid dynasty
(788–974)
Almoravid dynasty
(1040–1147)
Almohad dynasty
(1121–1269)
Marinid dynasty
(1244–1465)
Idrisid interlude
(1465–1471)
Wattasid dynasty
(1471–1549, 1554)
Saadi dynasty
(1549–1659)
Dila'i interlude
(1659–1663)
Alaouite dynasty
(1666–present)
Years in Morocco (1956–present)
Heads of state and government of Africa
Heads of state
Heads of government
Defunct states
and governments

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