List of religious populations

This is a list of religious populations by number of adherents and countries.

Adherent estimates in 2012

Adherents.com says "Sizes shown are approximate estimates, and are here mainly for the purpose of ordering the groups, not providing a definitive number".[2]

Religion Adherents Percentage
Christianity 2.4 billion[3] 33%
Islam 1.8 billion[3] 24.1%
Secular[a]/Nonreligious[b]/Agnostic/Atheist 1.2 billion 16%
Hinduism 1.15 billion 15%
Buddhism 521 million 7%
Chinese traditional religion[c] 394 million 5.50%
Ethnic religions excluding some in separate categories 300 million 4.19%
African traditional religions 100 million[5] 1.40%
Sikhism 30 million 0.32%
Spiritism 15 million 0.21%
Judaism 14.5 million[6] 0.20%
Bahá'í 7.0 million 0.10%
Jainism 4.2 million 0.06%
Shinto 4.0 million 0.06%
Cao Dai 4.0 million 0.06%
Zoroastrianism 2.6 million 0.04%
Tenrikyo 2.0 million 0.02%
Neo-Paganism 1.0 million 0.01%
Unitarian Universalism 0.8 million 0.01%
Rastafari 0.6 million 0.01%
total 7.167 billion 100%

Notes

  1. ^ These figures may incorporate populations of secular/nominal adherents as well as syncretist worshipers, although the concept of syncretism is disputed by some.
  2. ^ Nonreligious includes agnostic, atheist, secular humanist, and people answering 'none' or no religious preference. Half of this group is theistic but nonreligious.[2] According to a 2012 study by Gallup International "59% of the world said that they think of themselves as religious person, 23% think of themselves as not religious whereas 13% think of themselves as convinced atheists".[4]
  3. ^ Chinese traditional religion is described as "the common religion of the majority Chinese culture: a combination of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism, as well as the traditional non-scriptural/local practices and beliefs."

By proportion

Christians

Countries with the greatest proportion of Christians from Christianity by country (as of 2010):

  1.   Vatican City 100% (100% Roman Catholic)
  2.  Pitcairn Islands 100% (100% Seventh-day Adventist)[7]
  3.  Samoa ~99% (mostly Protestant)[8]
  4.  Romania 99% (mostly Romanian Orthodox)
  5.  American Samoa 98.3% (mostly Protestant)[9]
  6.  Malta 98.1%[10] (mostly Roman Catholic)
  7.  Venezuela 98%[11] (71% Roman Catholic)
  8.  Greece 98% [12] (95% Greek Orthodox)
  9.  Marshall Islands 97.2% (mostly Protestant)[13]
  10.  Tonga 97.2% (mostly Protestant)[14]
  11.  San Marino 97%[15] (~97% Roman Catholic)
  12.  Paraguay 96.9%[16] (mostly Roman Catholic)
  13.  Peru 96.5%[17] (mostly Roman Catholic)
  14.  El Salvador 96.4% (mostly Roman Catholic)[18]
  15.  Kiribati 96% (mostly Protestant)[19]
  16.  Federated States of Micronesia ~96% (mostly Protestant)[20]
  17.  Barbados 95.1% (mostly Protestant)[21]
  18.  Papua New Guinea 94.8% (mostly Protestant)[22]
  19.  East Timor 94.2%[23][24] (mostly Roman Catholic)
  20.  Armenia 93.5%[25] (mostly Armenian Orthodox)

Muslims

Countries with the greatest proportion of Muslims from Islam by country (as of 2010) (figures excluding foreign workers in parenthesis):

  1.  Maldives 100% (mostly Sunni)[26]
  2.  Mauritania 100% (mostly Sunni)
  3.  Saudi Arabia Reported to be 100%[27] (90–95% Sunni, 5–10% Shi'a[27])
  4.  Turkey 99.8% (75% Sunni, 25% Shi'a)[28]
  5.  Somalia 99.8% (mostly Sunni)[29]
  6.  Afghanistan ~99%[30] (mostly Sunni, 20% Shi'a)[31]
  7.  Yemen 99.1% (99.9%) (53% Sunni, 47% Shi'a[32])
  8.  Morocco 98.7% (mostly Sunni)
  9.  Algeria 98.3%[33] (mostly Sunni)
  10.  Iran 98% (mostly Shi'a)[34]
  11.  Tunisia 98% (mostly Sunni)
  12.  Comoros 98% (mostly Sunni)[35]
  13.  Pakistan 97%[36] (85% Sunni, 15% Shi'a)[37]
  14.  Sudan 97%[38] (mostly Sunni)
  15.  Libya 96.6% (99%)[39] (Sunni)
  16.  Iraq 95% (Mostly Shi'a)[40]
  17.  Kuwait 95% (Mostly Sunni)[41]
  18.  Djibouti 94% (mostly Sunni)[42]
  19.  Niger 93% (mostly Sunni)[43]
  20.  Azerbaijan 91.6[44] (mostly Shi'a)[45]
  21.  Bangladesh 89.4% (Sunni)[46]
  22.  Egypt 89.3% (Sunni)[47]
  23.  Indonesia 87.18% (99% Sunni)[48]
  24.  Bahrain 79%[49] (Mostly Shi'a)[32]
  25.  Malaysia 61.30% (mostly Sunni).[50]

Remarks: Saudi Arabia does not include other religious beliefs in their census, the figures for these other religious groups could be higher than reported in the nation. While conversion to Islam is among its most supported tenets, conversion from Islam to another religion is considered to be the sin of apostasy[51] and could be subject to the death penalty in the country.

Irreligious and atheist

Countries with the greatest proportion of people without religion (including agnostics and atheists) from Irreligion by country (as of 2007):

  1.  Estonia 71–82% (77%)
  2.  Czech Republic 70-81% (76%)
  3.  Japan 64–88% (76%)[54]
  4.  Denmark 72%
  5.  Sweden 46–82% (64%)
  6.  Vietnam 44–81% (63%)
  7.  Macau 62%[55]
  8.  Hong Kong 57%[56]
  9.  France 43–64%[57] (54%)
  10.  Norway 31–72% (52%)
  11.  China 47%[58] (details)
  12.  Netherlands 39–55% (47%)
  13.  Finland 28–60% (44%)
  14.  New Zealand 42%[59]
  15.  United Kingdom 31–52% (42%)[57]
    1.  England and  Wales 25% [60]
  16.  South Korea 30–52% (41%)
  17.  Germany 25[61]–55%[62] (40%)
  18.  Hungary 32–46% (39%)
  19.  Belgium 42–43% (39%)
  20.  Bulgaria 34–40% (37%)
  21.  Slovenia 35–38% (37%)
  22.  Russia[63] 13–48% (31%)

Remarks: Ranked by mean estimate which is in brackets. Irreligious includes agnostic, atheist, secular believer, and people having no formal religious adherence. It does not necessarily mean that members of this group don't belong to any religion. Some religions have harmonized with local cultures and can be seen as a cultural background rather than a formal religion. Additionally, the practice of officially associating a family or household with a religious institute while not formally practicing the affiliated religion is common in many countries. Thus, over half of this group is theistic and/or influenced by religious principles, but nonreligious/non-practicing and not true atheists or agnostics.[2] See Spiritual but not religious.

Hindus

Countries with the greatest proportion of Hindus from Hinduism by country (as of 2010):

  1.    Nepal 81.3%[64]
  2.  India 79.8%[65]
  3.  Mauritius 54%[66]
  4.  Fiji 33.7%[67]
  5.  Guyana 28%[68]
  6.  Bhutan 25%[69]
  7.  Suriname 22.3%[70]
  8.  Trinidad and Tobago 18.2%[71]
  9.  United Arab Emirates 15%[72]
  10.  Sri Lanka 12.6%[73]
  11.  Kuwait 12%[74]
  12.  Bangladesh 9.6%[75]
  13.  Bahrain 8.1%[76]
  14.  Réunion 6.7%[77]
  15.  Malaysia 6.3%[78]
  16.  Singapore 5.1%
  17.  Oman 3%
  18.  Seychelles 2.1%[79]
  19.  New Zealand 2.0%[80]
  20.  Pakistan 1.8%
  21.  Indonesia 1.7%[81]
  22.  United Kingdom 1.7%[82]
  23.  United States 0.7%[83]

Buddhists

Countries with the greatest proportion of Buddhists from Buddhism by country (as of 2010):[84]

Taoists/Confucianists/Chinese traditional religionists

As a spiritual practice, Taoism has made fewer inroads in the West than Buddhism and Hinduism. Despite the popularity of its great classics the I Ching and the Tao Te Ching, the specific practices of Taoism have not been promulgated in America with much success;[85] these religions are not ubiquitous worldwide in the way that adherents of bigger world religions are, and they remain primarily an ethnic religion. Nonetheless, Taoist ideas and symbols such as Taijitu have become popular throughout the world through Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, and various martial arts.[86]

  1.  Taiwan 33–80%[87]
  2.  China 30%[88]
  3.  Hong Kong 28%[56]
  4.  Macau 13.9%[55]
  5.  Singapore 8.5%[89]
  6.  Malaysia 2.6%[90]
  7.  South Korea 0.2–1%[91]
  8.  Vietnam
  9.  Philippines 0.01–0.05%
  10.  Indonesia 0.05%

The Chinese traditional religion has 184,000 believers in Latin America, 250,000 believers in Europe, and 839,000 believers in North America as of 1998.[92][93]

Ethnic and indigenous

All of the below come from the U.S. Department of State 2009 International Religious Freedom Report,[94] based on the highest estimate of people identified as indigenous or followers of indigenous religions that have been well-defined. Due to the syncretic nature of these religions, the following numbers may not reflect the actual number of practitioners.

  1.  Haiti 50%[95]
  2.  Guinea-Bissau 50%
  3.  Cameroon 40%
  4.  Togo 33%[96]
  5.  Côte d'Ivoire 25%
  6.  Sudan 25%[97]
  7.  Benin 23%
  8.  Burundi 20%
  9.  Burkina Faso 15%
  10.  New Zealand 15%[98]
  11.  South Africa 15%[99]
  12.  Democratic Republic of the Congo 12%
  13.  Central African Republic 10%
  14.  Gabon 10%
  15.  Lesotho 10%
  16.  Nigeria 10%
  17.  Sierra Leone 10%[100]
  18.  Indonesia 9%[101]
  19.  Kenya 9%
  20.  Palau 9%[102]
  21.  Ghana 8.5%
  22.  Guinea 5%

Sikhism

Countries with the greatest proportion of Sikhs:

  1.  India 1.9%
  2.  United Kingdom 1.2%[103][104]
  3.  Canada 0.9%[105]
  4.  Malaysia 0.5%[106]
  5.  Fiji 0.3%[107]
  6.  Singapore 0.3%[108]
  7.  United States 0.2%[109][110]
  8.  New Zealand 0.2%[111]
  9.  Australia 0.1%[112][113]
  10.  Italy 0.1%[114]

The Sikh homeland is the Punjab state, in India, where today Sikhs make up approximately 61% of the population. This is the only place where Sikhs are in the majority. Sikhs have emigrated to countries all over the world – especially to English-speaking and East Asian nations. In doing so they have retained, to an unusually high degree, their distinctive cultural and religious identity. Sikhs are not ubiquitous worldwide in the way that adherents of larger world religions are, and they remain primarily an ethnic religion. But they can be found in many international cities and have become an especially strong religious presence in the United Kingdom and Canada.[115]

Spiritism

  1.  Cuba 10.3%
  2.  Jamaica 10.2%
  3.  Brazil 4.8%
  4.  Suriname 3.6%
  5.  Haiti 2.7%
  6.  Dominican Republic 2.2%
  7.  The Bahamas 1.9%
  8.  Nicaragua 1.5%
  9.  Trinidad and Tobago 1.4%
  10.  Guyana 1.3%
  11.  Venezuela 1.1%
  12.  Colombia 1.0%
  13.  Belize 1.0%
  14.  Honduras 0.9%
  15.  Puerto Rico 0.7%
  16.  Panama 0.5%
  17.  Iceland 0.5%
  18.  Guadeloupe 0.4%
  19.  Argentina 0.2%
  20.  Guatemala 0.2%

[116]

Note that all these estimates come from a single source. However, this source gives a relative indication of the size of the Spiritist communities within each country.

Judaism

Countries with the greatest proportion of Jews (as of 2017):

  1.  Israel 73.6%[6]
  2.  Gibraltar 2.0%[6]
  3.  United States 1.76%[6]
  4.  Canada 1.07%[6]
  5.  France 0.7%[6]
  6.  Hungary 0.485%[6]
  7.  Uruguay 0.483%[6]
  8.  Australia 0.47%[6]
  9.  United Kingdom 0.44%[6]
  10.  Argentina 0.41%[6]
  11.  U.S. Virgin Islands 0.36%[6]
  12.  Belgium 0.259%[6]
  13.  Panama 0.250%[6]
  14.  Latvia 0.24%[6]
  15.   Switzerland 0.22%[6]
  16.  Netherlands 0.17%[6]
  17.  New Zealand 0.16%[6]
  18.  Estonia 0.154%[6]
  19.  Bermuda 0.154%[6]
  20.  Sweden 0.152%[6]
  21.  Germany 0.14%[6]
  22.  South Africa 0.124%[6]
  23.  Ukraine 0.124%[6]
  24.  Russia 0.122%[6]
  25.  Denmark 0.112%[6]

Bahá'ís

Countries with the greatest proportion of Bahá'ís (as of 2010) with a national population ≥200,000:

  1.  Belize 2.5% (The 2010 Belize Population Census recorded 202 Bahá'ís out of a total population of 304,106,[117][118] yielding a proportion of 0.066%)
  2.  Bolivia 2.2%
  3.  Zambia 1.8%
  4.  Mauritius 1.8% (The 2011 Mauritius census recorded 639 Bahá'ís out of a total population of 1,236,817[119] yielding a proportion of 0.05%)
  5.  Guyana 1.6% (The 2002 Guyana census recorded 500 Bahá'ís out of a total population of 751,223[120] yielding a proportion of 0.067%)
  6.  Vanuatu 1.4%
  7.  Barbados 1.2% (The 2010 Barbados census recorded 178 Bahá'ís out of a total population of 250,010[121] yielding a proportion of 0.07%)
  8.  Trinidad and Tobago 1.2%
  9.  Panama 1.2%
  10.  Kenya 1.0%
  11.  Lesotho 0.9%
  12.  Papua New Guinea 0.9%
  13.  Réunion 0.9%
  14.  Chad 0.9%
  15.  Botswana 0.8%
  16.  Gambia 0.8%
  17.  Suriname 0.8%
  18.  Congo, Republic of the 0.6%
  19.  Solomon Islands 0.6%
  20.  Venezuela 0.6%
  • Remarks and sources: "Most Baha'i Nations (2010)". QuickLists > Compare Nations > Religions. The Association of Religion Data Archives. 2010. Retrieved 2013-08-20. which used the "World Christian Database" for adherents estimates based on information provided by the World Christian Encyclopedia and "World Christian Trends". A source whose only systematic flaw was to consistently have a higher estimate of Christians than other cross-national data sets.[122] See "The Largest Baha'i Communities". Largest Religious Communities. Adherents.com. 2013. Retrieved 2013-08-20. for 2000 estimates among all nations. Various census figures of some of these countries vary significantly. See Bahá'í statistics.

Jainism

  1.  India 0.3%
  2.  Suriname 0.3%
  3.  Fiji 0.2%
  4.  Kenya 0.2%
  5.    Nepal 0.1%

By population

Christians

Largest Christian populations (as of 2011):

  1.  United States 229,157,250[123] (details)
  2.  Brazil 169,213,130[124]
  3.  Russia 114,198,444[125]
  4.  Mexico 106,204,560[126]
  5.  Nigeria 80,510,000[127]
  6.  Philippines 78,790,000[128]
  7.  China 67,070,000[127]
  8.  Democratic Republic of the Congo 63,150,000[127]
  9.  France 55,948,600
  10.  Italy 55,832,000
  11.  Ethiopia 51,477,950
  12.  Germany 50,752,580[129]
  13.  Colombia 44,502,000
  14.  Ukraine 41,973,000
  15.  South Africa 40,243,000
  16.  Spain 38,568,000
  17.  Poland 36,526,000
  18.  Kenya 33,625,790
  19.  Argentina 33,497,100
  20.  United Kingdom 33,200,417
  21.  Uganda 29,943,000
  22.  India 28,436,000
  23.  Venezuela 28,340,790
  24.  Peru 27,365,100
  25.  Indonesia 24,123,000

Hindus

Largest Hindu populations (as of 2010):

  1.  India 957,636,314
  2.    Nepal 21,354,570
  3.  Bangladesh 14,274,430
  4.  Indonesia 4,012,470[81]
  5.  Pakistan 2,603,895
  6.  Sri Lanka 2,554,606
  7.  Malaysia 1,700,100
  8.  United States 1,543,730
  9.  United Arab Emirates 1,239,610
  10.  South Africa 749,870
  11.  Mauritius 665,820
  12.  United Kingdom 630,000
  13.  Canada 497,960
  14.  Tanzania 403,570
  15.  Kuwait 328,440
  16.  Australia 275,500
  17.  Singapore 264,370
  18.  Fiji 261,097[67]
  19.  Trinidad and Tobago 240,100[71]
  20.  Myanmar 203,000[130]
  21.  Bhutan 177,100
  22.  Germany 120,000

Muslims

Muslim population map 2009
Muslim population by country, 2009.

Largest Muslim populations (as of 2017):

  1.  Indonesia 245,000,000[81]
  2.  Pakistan 203,000,000
  3.  India 182,000,000
  4.  Bangladesh 142,937,800
  5.  Nigeria 90,000,000
  6.  Iran 73,238,340
  7.  Egypt 70,056,000
  8.  Turkey 70,036,838
  9.  Algeria 36,092,810
  10.  Morocco 31,351,800
  11.  Afghanistan 30,112,680
  12.  Sudan 30,064,180
  13.  Iraq 29,767,300
  14.  Ethiopia 28,120,050
  15.  Saudi Arabia 26,624,560
  16.  Uzbekistan 25,628,240
  17.  Russia 25,000,000[131]
  18.  Yemen 23,836,523
  19.  China 20,095,870
  20.  Syria 19,601,750
  21.  Malaysia 17,085,402

Buddhists

Largest Buddhist populations

  1.  China 244,130,000
  2.  Thailand 64,420,000
  3.  Japan 45,820,000
  4.  Burma 38,410,000
  5.  South Korea 10,500,000
  6.  India 9,250,000
  7.  Malaysia 5,010,000
  8.  Sri Lanka 4,450,000
  9.  Vietnam 4,380,000
  10.  United States 3,800,023
  11.  Cambodia 3,690,000
  12.  Indonesia 1,710,000

Sikhs

Largest Sikh populations

  1.  India 22,892,600
  2.  United Kingdom 853,000
  3.  Canada 620,200
  4.  United States 500,010
  5.  Malaysia 120,000
  6.  Bangladesh 100,000[132]
  7.  Australia 72,300
  8.  Italy 70,000
  9.  Thailand 70,000
  10.  Myanmar 70,000
  11.  United Arab Emirates 50,000
  12.  Pakistan 50,000
  13.  Germany 40,000
  14.  Mauritius 37,700
  15.  Kenya 20,000
  16.  Kuwait 20,000
  17.  Philippines 20,000
  18.  New Zealand 17,400
  19.  Indonesia 15,000
  20.  Singapore 14,500

Jews

Largest Jewish populations (as of 2017):

  1.  Israel 6,451,000[6]
  2.  United States 5,700,000[6]
  3.  France 456,000[6]
  4.  Canada 390,000[6]
  5.  United Kingdom 289,500[6]
  6.  Argentina 180,500[6]
  7.  Russia 176,000[6]
  8.  Germany 116,500[6]
  9.  Australia 113,200[6]
  10.  Brazil 93,800[6]
  11.  South Africa 69,300[6]
  12.  Ukraine 53,000[6]
  13.  Hungary 47,500[6]
  14.  Mexico 40,000[6]
  15.  Netherlands 29,800[6]
  16.  Belgium 29,300[6]
  17.  Italy 27,300[6]
  18.   Switzerland 18,700[6]
  19.  Chile 18,300[6]
  20.  Uruguay 16,900[6]
  21.  Turkey 15,300[6]
  22.  Sweden 15,000[6]
  23.  Spain 11,800[6]
  24.  Belarus 10,000[6]
  25.  Panama 10,000[6]

Bahá'ís

Largest Bahá'í populations (as of 2010) in countries with a national population ≥200,000:[133]

  1.  India 1,897,651 (The 2011 Census of India recorded 4,572 Bahá'ís[134][135])
  2.  United States 512,864
  3.  Kenya 422,782
  4.  Vietnam 388,802
  5.  Congo, Democratic Republic of the 282,916
  6.  Philippines 275,069
  7.  Iran 251,127
  8.  Zambia 241,112
  9.  South Africa 238,532
  10.  Bolivia 215,359
  11.  Tanzania 190,419
  12.  Venezuela 169,811
  13.  Uganda 95,098
  14.  Chad 94,499
  15.  Pakistan 87,259
  16.  Burma (Myanmar) 78,915
  17.  Colombia 70,504
  18.  Malaysia 67,549
  19.  Thailand 65,096
  20.  Papua New Guinea 59,898

Jainism

As of 2005:[136]

  1.  India 5,146,697
  2.  United States 79,459
  3.  Kenya 68,848
  4.  United Kingdom 35,000
  5.  Canada 12,101
  6.  Tanzania 9,002
  7.    Nepal 6,800
  8.  Uganda 2,663
  9.  Burma 2,398
  10.  Malaysia 2,052
  11.  South Africa 1,918
  12.  Fiji 1,573
  13.  Japan 1,535
  14.  Belgium 1,500
  15.  Australia 1,449
  16.  Suriname 1,217
  17.  Ireland 1,000
  18.  Réunion 981
  19.  Yemen 229

See also

Religions:

References

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  2. ^ a b c "Major Religions of the World Ranked by Number of Adherents". Adherents.com. 2005. Retrieved 19 Jun 2010.
  3. ^ a b http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/04/05/christians-remain-worlds-largest-religious-group-but-they-are-declining-in-europe/
  4. ^ "Global Index of Religion and Atheism: Press Release" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 October 2012. Retrieved 1 July 2015.
  5. ^ Lugira, Aloysius M., African Traditional Religions (New York: Chealsea House, 2009), p. 36 [in] Varghese, Roy Abraham, Christ Connection: How the World Religions Prepared the Way for the Penomenon of Jesus, Paraclete Press (2011), p. 1935, ISBN 9781557258397 [1] (Retrieved 24 March 2019)
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay "Jewish population - world 2017"" (PDF). www.jewishdatabank.org. Jewish data bank. Retrieved 25 April 2019.
  7. ^ "The World Factbook". Cia.gov. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
  8. ^ "Catholic Church". Gcatholic.org. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
  9. ^ "The Association of Religion Data Archives – National Profiles". Thearda.com. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
  10. ^ "The World Factbook". Cia.gov. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
  11. ^ "The World Factbook". Cia.gov. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
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External links

Adherents.com

Adherents.com is a website that collects and presents information on religious demographics, established in 1998. It is the largest pool of such data freely available on the internet. As of January 2010, the site contained approximately 44,000 references on over 4,300 faith groups. The site's information is arranged geographically, focusing on the number of adherents of a given denomination in a specific region or country.

According to the site, Adherents.com presents "data from both primary research sources such as government census reports, statistical sampling surveys and organizational reporting, as well as citations from secondary literature which mention adherent statistics." The website is a private project by Preston Hunter, a computer programmer of Texas, USA. It is neither supported by or affiliated with any organization.

Buddhism by country

Buddhism is a religion practiced by an estimated 488 million in the world, 495 million, or 535 million people as of the 2010s, representing 9% to 10% of the world's total population.

China is the country with the largest population of Buddhists, approximately 244 million or 18.2% of its total population. They are mostly followers of Chinese schools of Mahayana, making this the largest body of Buddhist traditions. Mahayana, also practised in broader East Asia, is followed by over half of the world's Buddhists.The second largest body of Buddhist schools is Theravada, mostly followed in Southeast Asia. The third and smallest body of schools Vajrayana, is followed mostly in Tibet, the Himalayan region, Mongolia and parts of Russia, but is disseminated throughout the world.

According to a demographic analysis reported by Peter Harvey (2013):

Eastern Buddhism (Mahayana) has 360 million adherents;

Southern Buddhism (Theravada) has 150 million adherents; and

Northern Buddhism (Vajrayana) has 18.2 million adherents.

Seven million additional Buddhists are found outside Asia.

Christianity in Europe

Christianity is the largest religion in Europe. Christianity has been practiced in Europe since the first century, and a number of the Pauline Epistles were addressed to Christians living in Greece, as well as other parts of the Roman Empire.

According to a 2010 study by the Pew Research Center, 76.2% of the European population identified themselves as Christians.As 2010 Catholics were the largest Christian group in Europe, accounting for more than 48% of European Christians. The second-largest Christian group in Europe were the Orthodox, who made up 32% of European Christians. About 19% of European Christians were part of the Protestant tradition. Russia is the largest Christian country in Europe by population, followed by Germany and Italy.Since at least the legalization of Christianity by the Roman Emperor Constantine in the 4th century, Europe has been an important centre of Christian culture, even though the religion was inherited from Africa and the Middle East and important Christian communities have thrived outside Europe such as Oriental Orthodoxy and the Church of the East since the time of Christ. Christian culture has been an important force in Western civilization, influencing the course of philosophy, art, and science.Europe has a rich Christian culture, especially as numerous saints, martyrs and popes were European themselves. All of the Roman Catholic popes from 741 to 2013 were from Europe. Europe brought together many of the Christian holy sites and heritage and religious centers.

Hinduism by country

Hinduism has over 1.1 billion adherents worldwide (15–16% of world's population). Nepal (81.3%) and India (79.8%) are countries with Hindus being the majority of their respective populations. Along with Christianity (31.5%), Islam (23.2%) and Buddhism (7.1%), Hinduism is one of the four major religions of the world by percentage of population. Hinduism is the third largest religion in the world after Christianity and Islam, followed by Buddhism.Presently, India, Nepal are the two Hindu majority countries. Most Hindus are found in Asian countries. The countries with more than 500,000 Hindu residents and citizens include (in decreasing order) – India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Indonesia (especially in Bali, which is 84% Hindu), Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Singapore, United States, Myanmar, United Kingdom, Canada, South Africa, Mauritius, and the Caribbean([Hinduism in the Fiji|Fiji (West Indies).

There are significant numbers of Hindu enclaves around the world, with many in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Hinduism is also practised by the non-Indic people like Balinese of Bali island (Indonesia), Tengger of Java (Indonesia) and Balamon Cham of Vietnam.

Importance of religion by country

This page charts a list of countries by importance of religion.

List of continents by population

This is a list of all major regions' population.

List of countries and dependencies by population

This is a list of countries and dependent territories by population. It includes sovereign states, inhabited dependent territories and, in some cases, constituent countries of sovereign states, with inclusion within the list being primarily based on the ISO standard ISO 3166-1. For instance, the United Kingdom is considered as a single entity, while the constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands are considered separately. In addition, this list includes certain states with limited recognition not found in ISO 3166-1.

Also given in percent is each country's population compared with the population of the world, which the United Nations estimates at 7.71 billion as of today.

List of countries by irreligion

Irreligion, which may include deism, agnosticism, ignosticism, anti-religion, atheism, skepticism, ietsism, spiritual but not religious, freethought, anti-theism, apatheism, non-belief, pandeism, secular humanism, non-religious theism, pantheism and panentheism, varies in the different countries around the world. According to reports from the Worldwide Independent Network/Gallup International Association's (WIN/GIA) four global polls: in 2005, 77% were a religious person and 4% were "convinced atheists" while in 2012, 23% were not a religious person and an additional 13% were "convinced atheists"; in 2015, 22% were not a religious person and an additional 11% were "convinced atheists"; and in 2017, 25% were not a religious person and an additional 9% were "convinced atheists".According to sociologist Phil Zuckerman, broad estimates of those who have an absence of belief in a God range from 500 to 750 million people worldwide. According to sociologists Ariela Keysar and Juhem Navarro-Rivera's review of numerous global studies on atheism, there are 450 to 500 million positive atheists and agnostics worldwide (7% of the world's population), with China having the most atheists in the world (200 million convinced atheists).

List of countries by population in 1989

This is a list of countries by population in 1989, providing an overview of the world population before the fall of the Iron Curtain.

Data is taken from the annual dictionary which appeared in late 1990. While population data is almost exclusively dated 1989, political developments before the summer of 1990 are taken into account, including Yemeni unification and Namibian independence but not German reunification which was finalised only in October.

The numbers given in "Aktuell '91" are fully compatible with the data given by the U.S. Census Bureau, where they can be compared, as the US Census Data refers to modern national borders instead of 1989 borders. Similar remarks apply to 1990 estimates in the List of countries by past and future population which also only apply to modern-day national borders. See also Soviet Census (1989) and 1990 United States Census for comparison.

List of countries by population in 2000

This is harmonized list of population estimates for the year 2000. For a listing with more recent estimates, see List of countries and dependencies by population.

This is a list of countries by population in 2000. It is a list of countries in the world by population in the exact beginning of the year 2000.

Because the table contains data only for the 230 nations and territories at the start of 2000, there are no entries for national regions declared later in 2000.

This list adopts definitions of "country" on a case by case basis. The United Kingdom is considered as a single country while constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands are regarded separately.

List of countries by population in 2005

This is harmonized list of population estimates for the year 2005. For a listing with more recent estimates, see List of countries by population

This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population, with population figures estimated for 1 July 2005 (rounded to the nearest 1,000). The figures are estimates for the year 2005 from the U.N. World Population Prospects (2004 revision) using the medium fertility variant.The list includes all sovereign states and dependent territories recognized by the United Nations, plus the territory under the effective control of the Republic of China (Taiwan).

This list adopts definitions of "country" on a case by case basis. The "United Kingdom" is considered as a single country while constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands are regarded separately.

List of countries by population in 2010

This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population, with population figures estimated for 2010 (rounded to the nearest 1,000). The figures are estimates for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) "2010 annual statistics", which lists more than 100,000 population by country and territory.

The list includes all sovereign states and dependent territories recognized by the United Nations plus the territory under the effective control of the Republic of China (Taiwan).

This list adopts definitions of "country" on a case by case basis. The United Kingdom is considered as a single country while constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands are regarded separately.

List of regional organizations by population

The following is a list of regional organizations by population in 2018.

List of religions and spiritual traditions

While religion is hard to define, one standard model of religion, used in religious studies courses, was proposed by Clifford Geertz, who defined it as a

[…] system of symbols which acts to establish powerful, pervasive, and long-lasting moods and motivations in men by formulating conceptions of a general order of existence and clothing these conceptions with such an aura of factuality that the moods and motivations seem uniquely realistic." A critique of Geertz's model by Talal Asad categorized religion as "an anthropological category." Many religions have narratives, symbols, traditions and sacred histories that are intended to give meaning to life or to explain the origin of life or the universe. They tend to derive morality, ethics, religious laws, or a preferred lifestyle from their ideas about the cosmos and human nature. According to some estimates, there are roughly 4,200 religions in the world.The word religion is sometimes used interchangeably with "faith" or "belief system", but religion differs from private belief in that it has a public aspect. Most religions have organized behaviours, including clerical hierarchies, a definition of what constitutes adherence or membership, congregations of laity, regular meetings or services for the purposes of veneration of a deity or for prayer, holy places (either natural or architectural) or religious texts. Certain religions also have a sacred language often used in liturgical services. The practice of a religion may also include sermons, commemoration of the activities of a god or gods, sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trance, rituals, rites, ceremonies, worship, initiations, funerals, marriages, meditation, invocation, mediumship, music, art, dance, public service or other aspects of human culture. Religious beliefs have also been used to explain parapsychological phenomena such as out-of-body experiences, near-death experiences and reincarnation, along with many other paranormal and supernatural experiences.Some academics studying the subject have divided religions into three broad categories: world religions, a term which refers to transcultural, international faiths; indigenous religions, which refers to smaller, culture-specific or nation-specific religious groups; and new religious movements, which refers to recently developed faiths. One modern academic theory of religion, social constructionism, says that religion is a modern concept that suggests all spiritual practice and worship follows a model similar to the Abrahamic religions as an orientation system that helps to interpret reality and define human beings, and thus religion, as a concept, has been applied inappropriately to non-Western cultures that are not based upon such systems, or in which these systems are a substantially simpler construct.

Major religious groups

The world's principal religions and spiritual traditions may be classified into a small number of major groups, although this is by no means a uniform practice. This theory began in the 18th century with the goal of recognizing the relative levels of civility in societies.

Oriental Orthodoxy by country

Oriental Orthodox churches are the churches descended from those that rejected the Council of Chalcedon in 451. Despite the similar name, they are therefore a different branch of Christianity from the Eastern Orthodox. Oriental Orthodoxy consists of several autocephalous and autonomous jurisdictions holding a single set of beliefs and united in full communion. However, they each have their own separate rites, and there are significant differences between their respective practices. Thus, there is more internal diversity of practice among the Oriental Orthodox than among the Eastern Orthodox.

Religion in the European Union

Religion in the European Union is diverse. The largest religion in the EU is Christianity, which accounts for 71.6% of EU population. Smaller groups include those of Islam, Buddhism, Judaism, Hinduism, and some East Asian religions, most concentrated in Germany, Britain and France. Also present are revival movements of pre-Christianity European folk religions including Heathenism, Rodnovery, Romuva, and Druidry.Over the last several decades, religious practice has been on the decline in a process of secularisation. Eurostat's Eurobarometer survey in 2010 showed that 20% of EU citizens don't believe there is any sort of spirit, God or life force. Many countries have experienced falling church attendance and membership in recent years.The countries with the most people reporting no belief in any sort of spirit, God or life force are France (40%), Czech Republic (37%), Sweden (34%), the Netherlands (30%), Estonia (29%), Germany (27%), Belgium (27%) and Slovenia (26%). The most religious countries are Romania (1% non-believers) and Malta (2% non-believers). Across the EU, belief is more common with older age and is higher amongst women, those with only basic education, and those "positioning themselves on the right of the political scale (57%)".

Sikhism by country

Sikhism can be found predominantly in the Punjab state of India but Sikh communities exist on every inhabited continent, with the largest emigrant population being in Canada and United Kingdom. In the early 21st century there were nearly 25 million Sikhs worldwide, the great majority of them living in the Indian state of Punjab.

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