List of regions of the United States

This is a list of some of the regions in the United States. Many regions are defined in law or regulations by the federal government; others by shared culture and history; and others by economic factors.

Interstate regions

Census Bureau-designated regions and divisions

Census Regions and Division of the United States
U.S. Census Bureau Regions and Divisions.

The United States Census Bureau defines four statistical regions, with nine divisions.[1] The Census Bureau region definition is "widely used [...] for data collection and analysis,"[2] and is the most commonly used classification system.[3][4][5][6]

Puerto Rico and other US territories are not part of any census region or census division.[8]

Standard federal regions

USFederalRegions
Standard federal regions.

The ten standard federal regions were established by OMB (Office of Management and Budget) Circular A-105, "Standard Federal Regions," in April, 1974, and required for all executive agencies. In recent years, some agencies have tailored their field structures to meet program needs and facilitate interaction with local, state, and regional counterparts. However, the OMB must still approve any departures.

  • Region I: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont
  • Region II: New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands
  • Region III: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia
  • Region IV: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee
  • Region V: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin
  • Region VI: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas
  • Region VII: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska
  • Region VIII: Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming
  • Region IX: Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands
  • Region X: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

Federal Reserve banks

Federal Reserve Districts Map
Federal Reserve districts.

The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 divided the country into twelve districts with a central Federal Reserve Bank in each district. These twelve Federal Reserve Banks together form a major part of the Federal Reserve System, the central banking system of the United States. Missouri is the only U.S. state to have two Federal Reserve locations within its borders, as some states are divided into more than one district.

  1. Boston
  2. New York
  3. Philadelphia
  4. Cleveland
  5. Richmond
  6. Atlanta
  7. Chicago
  8. St. Louis
  9. Minneapolis
  10. Kansas City
  11. Dallas
  12. San Francisco

Time zones

US-Timezones
U.S. time zones.

Courts of Appeals circuits

US Court of Appeals and District Court map
U.S. Courts of Appeals circuits.

The Federal Circuit is not a regional circuit. Its jurisdiction is nationwide, but based on subject matter.

Bureau of Economic Analysis regions

BEA regions
Bureau of Economic Analysis regions.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis defines regions for comparison of economic data.[9]

Energy Information Administration

The Energy Information Administration currently uses the PADD system established by Petroleum Administration for War in World War II.[10] It is used for data collection on refining petroleum and its products. Each PADD is subdivided into refining districts.

  • PADD I: East Coast
    • East Coast: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida; along with counties in New York east of, north of and including Cayuga, Tompkins, and Chemung; and counties in Pennsylvania east of and including Bradford, Sullivan, Columbia, Montour, Northumberland, Dauphin and York.
    • Appalachian No. 1: West Virginia along with counties of Pennsylvania and New York State not mentioned above.
  • PADD II: Midwest
    • Indiana-Illinois-Kentucky: Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Michigan, Ohio
    • Minnesota-Wisconsin-North and South Dakota: Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota
    • Oklahoma-Kansas-Missouri: Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa
  • PADD III: Gulf Coast
    • Texas Gulf Coast: The Texan counties of Newton, Orange, Jefferson, Jasper, Tyler, Hardin, Liberty, Chambers, Polk, San Jacinto, Montgomery, Harris, Galveston, Waller, Fort Bend, Brazoria, Wharton, Matagorda, Jackson, Victoria, Calhoun, Refugio, Aransas, San Patricio, Nueces, Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy and Cameron
    • Texas Inland: Texan counties not mentioned above.
    • Louisiana Gulf Coast: Parishes of Louisiana south of, and including Vernon, Rapides, Avoyelles, Pointe Coupee, West Feliciana, East Feliciana, Saint Helena, Tangipahoa and Washington; along with Pearl River, Stone, George, Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson County of Mississippi; and Alabama's Mobile and Baldwin County.
    • North Louisiana-Arkansas: Arkansas and parts of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama not mentioned above.
    • New Mexico: New Mexico
  • PADD IV: Rocky Mountain: Colorado, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Utah
  • PADD V: West Coast: Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Arizona, Alaska, Hawaii[11]

PADD I can also be subdivided into 3 Subdistricts:

  • Sub-PAD 1A: New England (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont)
  • Sub-PAD 1B: Central Atlantic (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, District of Columbia)
  • Sub-PAD 1C: Lower Atlantic (Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia)[12]

Agricultural Research Service

ARS service regions.jpeg
US map of the five ARS regions (USDA)

The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is the research arm of the USDA. The ARS has sectioned their work into five geographic regions:

  • Midwest Area
  • Northeast Area
  • Pacific West Area
  • Plains Area
  • Southeast Area.

Unofficial multi-state and multi-territory regions

There are also multi-territory regions:

The Belts

Interstate metropolitan areas

Interstate megalopolises

Intrastate and intraterritory regions

Alabama

AlaCounties
A map of Alabama regions.

Alaska

Alaska Panhandle
The Alaska Panhandle.

American Samoa

Arizona

Arkansas

Colorado

Front Range Urban Corridor
An enlargeable map of the Front Range Urban Corridor of Colorado and Wyoming

Connecticut

Map of Regions of Connecticut highlighting Greater Bridgeport Region
The Greater Bridgeport Region in location to other officially recognized Connecticut regions with regional governments.
Ctpanhandle
The Connecticut Panhandle and "The Oblong".

In Connecticut, there are 14 official regions, each with a regional government that serves for the absence of county government in Connecticut. There are also a fair number of unofficial regions in Connecticut with no regional government.

Delaware

"Upstate" or "Up North"

"Slower Lower"

District of Columbia

See Neighborhoods of the District of Columbia

Florida

The First Coast
The First Coast.
Directional regions
Local vernacular regions

Georgia

Physiographic regions

Guam

Hawaiʻi

Hawaiianislandchain USGS
Hawaiian archipelago

Idaho

Illinois

Littleegyptmap
Southern Illinois is also known as "Little Egypt".

Indiana

IndianaRegions
Regions of Indiana.

Iowa

IowaRegions2012
Regions of Iowa.

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Louisiana regions map
A map of Louisiana's regions.

Maine

Maryland

Regions of Maryland USA
Maryland's regions.

Regions shared with other states:

Massachusetts

Berkshire ma highlight
The Berkshire region of Massachusetts.

Michigan

Michigan Regions
Michigan's regions.

Lower Peninsula

Upper Peninsula

Minnesota

MinnesotaRegions
Regions of Minnesota.

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

Map of New York Economic Regions
Regions of New York as defined by the New York State Department of Economic Development.
1. Western New Yorkcounties : Niagara, Erie, Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, Allegany
2. Finger Lakescounties : Orleans, Genesee, Wyoming, Monroe, Livingston, Wayne, Ontario, Yates, Seneca
3. Southern Tiercounties : Steuben, Schuyler, Chemung, Tompkins, Tioga, Chenango, Broome, Delaware
4. Central New Yorkcounties : Cortland, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oswego, Madison
5. North Countrycounties : St. Lawrence, Lewis, Jefferson, Hamilton, Essex, Clinton, Franklin
6. Mohawk Valleycounties : Oneida, Herkimer, Fulton, Montgomery, Otsego, Schoharie
7. Capital Districtcounties : Albany, Columbia, Greene, Warren, Washington, Saratoga, Schenectady, Rensselaer
8. Hudson Valleycounties : Sullivan, Ulster, Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Westchester
9. New York Citycounties (boroughs) : New York (Manhattan), Bronx (The Bronx), Queens (Queens), Kings (Brooklyn), Richmond (Staten Island)
10. Long Islandcounties : Nassau, Suffolk

North Carolina

NC regions
Regions of North Carolina.

North Dakota

Northern Mariana Islands

Ohio

Black Swamp
  The area roughly covered by the Great Black Swamp

Oklahoma

Oregon

Oregon DEM relief map
Oregon's topography.

Pennsylvania

Puerto Rico

Rhode Island

South Carolina

Travel/Tourism locations
Other geographical distinctions

South Dakota

South Dakota East River West River
South Dakota
East River and West River

Tennessee

Other geographical distinctions:

Texas

U.S. Minor Outlying Islands

United States Minor Outlying Islands
The United States Minor Outlying Islands (Navassa Island not on map)

Utah

Vermont

Virgin Islands

Virginia

Shenandoah watershed
A map of the Shenandoah Valley.

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wisconsin geographic provinces

Wisconsin can be divided into five geographic regions.

Wyoming

Other regional listings

Boy Scouts of America regional division map
Boy Scouts of America regions in 1992
Regions of the Boy Scouts of America

See also

Notes

  1. ^ This region also includes independent Samoa, which is not part of the United States
  2. ^ This region also includes the British Virgin Islands, which is not part of the United States
  3. ^ Claimed by Tokelau
  4. ^ Midway Atoll, part of the Northwest Hawaiian Islands, is not politically part of Hawaii; it is one of the United States Minor Outlying Islands
  5. ^ Claimed by Haiti
  6. ^ Claimed by the Marshall Islands

References

  1. ^ United States Census Bureau, Geography Division. "Census Regions and Divisions of the United States" (PDF). Retrieved January 10, 2013.
  2. ^ "The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003" (Report #:DOE/EIA-0581, October 2009). United States Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration.
  3. ^ "The most widely used regional definitions follow those of the U.S. Bureau of the Census." Seymour Sudman and Norman M. Bradburn, Asking Questions: A Practical Guide to Questionnaire Design (1982). Jossey-Bass: p. 205.
  4. ^ "Perhaps the most widely used regional classification system is one developed by the U.S. Census Bureau." Dale M. Lewison, Retailing, Prentice Hall (1997): p. 384. ISBN 978-0-13-461427-4
  5. ^ "(M)ost demographic and food consumption data are presented in this four-region format." Pamela Goyan Kittler, Kathryn P. Sucher, Food and Culture, Cengage Learning (2008): p.475. ISBN 9780495115410
  6. ^ "Census Bureau Regions and Divisions with State FIPS Codes" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 21, 2013. Retrieved June 20, 2010.
  7. ^ "Census Bureau Regions and Divisions with State FIPS Codes" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 21, 2013. Retrieved June 20, 2010.
  8. ^ "Geographic Terms and Concepts - Census Divisions and Census Regions". US Census Bureau. Retrieved August 19, 2015.
  9. ^ "BEA Regions". Bureau of Economic Analysis. February 18, 2004. Retrieved December 27, 2012.
  10. ^ "Records of Petroleum Administration for War". Retrieved January 3, 2012.
  11. ^ "Appedix A: District Description and Maps" (PDF). Energy Information Administration. October 2012. Retrieved January 3, 2012.
  12. ^ "PADD Definitions". Energy Information Administration. Archived from the original on October 16, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2012.

External links

Federal Reserve Bank

A Federal Reserve Bank is a regional bank of the Federal Reserve System, the central banking system of the United States. There are twelve in total, one for each of the twelve Federal Reserve Districts that were created by the Federal Reserve Act of 1913. The banks are jointly responsible for implementing the monetary policy set forth by the Federal Open Market Committee, and are divided as follows:

Some banks also possess branches, with the whole system being headquartered at the Eccles Building in Washington, D.C.

Four Corners

The Four Corners is a region of the United States consisting of the southwestern corner of Colorado, southeastern corner of Utah, northeastern corner of Arizona, and northwestern corner of New Mexico. The Four Corners area is named after the quadripoint at the intersection of approximately 37° north latitude with 109° 03' west longitude, where the boundaries of the four states meet, and are marked by the Four Corners Monument. It is the only location in the United States where four states meet. Most of the Four Corners region belongs to semi-autonomous Native American nations, the largest of which is the Navajo Nation, followed by Hopi, Ute, and Zuni tribal reserves and nations. The Four Corners region is part of a larger region known as the Colorado Plateau and is mostly rural, rugged, and arid. In addition to the monument, commonly visited areas within Four Corners include Monument Valley, Mesa Verde National Park, Chaco Canyon, Canyons of the Ancients National Monument and Canyon de Chelly National Monument. The most populous city in the Four Corners region is Farmington, New Mexico, followed by Durango, Colorado.

Geography of the United States

The term "United States", when used in the geographical sense,

is the contiguous United States, the state of Alaska, the island state of Hawaii, the five insular territories of Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa, and minor outlying possessions. The United States shares land borders with Canada and Mexico and maritime borders with Russia, Cuba, and the Bahamas in addition to Canada and Mexico. The northern border of the United States with Canada is the world's longest bi-national land border.

Historic regions of the United States

This is a list of historic regions of the United States that existed at some time during the territorial evolution of the United States and its overseas possessions, from the colonial era to the present day. It includes formally organized territories, proposed and failed states, unrecognized breakaway states, international and interstate purchases, cessions, and land grants, and historical military departments and administrative districts. The last section lists informal regions from American vernacular geography known by popular nicknames and linked by geographical, cultural, or economic similarities, some of which are still in use today.

For a more complete list of regions and subdivisions of the United States used in modern times, see List of regions of the United States.

List of belt regions of the United States

The belt regions of the United States are portions of the country that share certain characteristics. The "belt" terminology was first applied to growing regions for various crops, which often follow lines of latitude because those are more likely to have similar climates. The allusion was to a long clothing belt, as seen on a map.The usage has expanded to other climatic, economic, and cultural concentrations. These regions are not formally defined; they frequently overlap and have vague borders. The terminology is also used outside the U.S. (e.g., India's Hindi Belt).

List of geographical regions in Texas

Texas is the second-largest state in the United States, with an area of 261,797 square miles (678,050 km2) and a population of 27.47 million in 254 counties. This covers an area 773 miles (1,244 km) wide by 790 miles (1,270 km) long. Due to its location and size, it is a part of a large number of unique geological regions, including the piney woods of East Texas, the plains in the Panhandle, the mountains in far West Texas, and hundreds of miles of coastline.

There are several different methods used to describe the geographic and geological differences within the state, and there are often subdivisions within a region which more accurately describe both the terrain and the culture. Because there is no single standard for subdividing the regions of Texas, many accepted areas either overlap or seem to contradict others. All are included for completeness.

List of mountain ranges of the Lower Colorado River Valley

This is a List of mountain ranges of the Lower Colorado River Valley, located in the western part of the southwestern United States; the eastern region would be the Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico.

This doubled list has the North–South running Colorado River sectioned into the west side of the river vs. the east side. The east side of the Colorado River is represented by the states of Arizona-Sonora, Mexico. The west side of the river is represented by southern Nevada, southeast Low Desert California, and a portion of northwestern Mexico, represented by the state of Baja California-(the North).

List of regions of California

This is a list of regions of California, organized by location.

List of regions of Oregon

This is a list of regions in the U.S. state of Oregon.

List of states and territories of the United States

The United States of America is a federal republic consisting of 50 states, a federal district (Washington, D.C., the capital city of the United States), five major territories, and various minor islands. The 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico; the two other states, Alaska and Hawaii, are in the northwestern part of North America and an archipelago in the mid-Pacific, respectively, while the territories are scattered throughout the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea.

States are the primary subdivisions of the United States, and possess a number of powers and rights under the United States Constitution, such as regulating intrastate commerce, running elections, creating local governments, and ratifying constitutional amendments. Each state has its own constitution, grounded in republican principles, and government, consisting of three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial. All states and their residents are represented in the federal Congress, a bicameral legislature consisting of the Senate and the House of Representatives. Each state is represented by two Senators, while Representatives are distributed among the states in proportion to the most recent constitutionally mandated decennial census. Additionally, each state is entitled to select a number of electors to vote in the Electoral College, the body that elects the President of the United States, equal to the total of Representatives and Senators in Congress from that state. Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1 of the Constitution grants to Congress the authority to admit new states into the Union. Since the establishment of the United States in 1776, the number of states has expanded from the original 13 to the current total of 50, and each new state is admitted on an equal footing with the existing states.As provided by Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, Congress exercises "exclusive jurisdiction" over the federal district, which is not part of any state. Prior to passage of the 1973 District of Columbia Home Rule Act, which devolved certain Congressional powers to an elected mayor and council, the district did not have an elected local government. Even so, Congress retains the right to review and overturn laws created by the council and intervene in local affairs. As it is not a state, the district does not have representation in the Senate. However, since 1971, its residents have been represented in the House of Representatives by a non-voting delegate. Additionally, since 1961, following ratification of the 23rd Amendment, the district has been entitled to select three electors to vote in the Electoral College.

In addition to the 50 states and federal district, the United States has sovereignty over 14 territories. Five of them (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) have a permanent, nonmilitary population, while nine of them do not. With the exception of Navassa Island, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, which are located in the Caribbean, all territories are located in the Pacific Ocean. One territory, Palmyra Atoll, is considered to be incorporated, meaning the full body of the Constitution has been applied to it; the other territories are unincorporated, meaning the Constitution does not fully apply to them. Ten territories (the Minor Outlying Islands and American Samoa) are considered to be unorganized, meaning they have not had an Organic Act enacted by Congress; the four other territories are organized, meaning they have had an Organic Act that has been enacted by Congress. The five inhabited territories each have limited autonomy and a non-voting delegate in Congress, in addition to having territorial legislatures and governors, but residents cannot vote in federal elections.

California is the most populous state, with 38,332,521 residents (2013 estimate); Wyoming is the least populous, with an estimated 582,658 residents. The District of Columbia, with an estimated 646,449 residents as of 2012, has a higher population than the two least populous states (Wyoming and Vermont). The largest state by area is Alaska, encompassing 665,384 square miles (1,723,340 km2), while the smallest is Rhode Island, encompassing 1,545 square miles (4,000 km2). The first state to ratify the current Constitution was Delaware, which it did on December 7, 1787, while the newest state is Hawaii, which was admitted to the Union on August 21, 1959. The largest territory in terms of both population and size is Puerto Rico, with 3,725,789 residents as of the 2010 Census and a total area of 5,325 square miles (13,790 km2).

Mid-Atlantic (United States)

The Mid-Atlantic, also called Middle Atlantic states or the Mid-Atlantic states, form a region of the United States generally located between New England and the South Atlantic States. Its exact definition differs upon source, but the region usually includes New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia, and West Virginia. When discussing climate, Connecticut is sometimes included in the region, since its climate is closer to the Middle Atlantic than the New England states. The Mid-Atlantic has played an important role in the development of American culture, commerce, trade, and industry.In the late 19th century, it was called "the typically American" region by Frederick Jackson Turner. Religious pluralism and ethnic diversity have been important elements of Mid-Atlantic society from its settlement by Dutch, Swedes, English Catholics, and Quakers through to the period of British rule, and beyond to the current day. After the American Revolution, the Mid-Atlantic region hosted each of the historic capitals of the United States, including the current federal capital, Washington, D.C.

In the early part of the 19th century, New York and Pennsylvania overtook Virginia as the most populous states and the New England states as the country's most important trading and industrial centers. Large numbers of German, Irish, Italian, Jewish, Polish, and other immigrants transformed the region, especially coastal cities such as New York City, Newark, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., but also interior cities such as Pittsburgh, Rochester, Albany, and Buffalo.

New York City, with its skyscrapers, subways, and headquarters of the United Nations, emerged in the 20th century as an icon of modernity and American economic and cultural power. By the 21st century, the coastal areas of the Mid-Atlantic were thoroughly urbanized.

The Northeast Corridor and Interstate 95 link an almost contiguous sprawl of suburbs and large and small cities, forming the Mid-Atlantic portion of the Northeast megalopolis, one of the world's most important concentrations of finance, media, communications, education, medicine, and technology.

The Mid-Atlantic is a relatively affluent region of the nation, having 43 of the 100 highest-income counties in the nation based on median household income and 33 of the top 100 based on per capita income. Most of the Mid-Atlantic states rank among the 15 highest-income states in the nation by median household income and per capita income.

The Mid-Atlantic is home to some of the most prestigious universities in the nation and world including Columbia University and Princeton University, which rank among the top 3 universities in the United States and top 10 universities in the world.

Political divisions of the United States

Political divisions (or administrative divisions) of the United States are the various recognized governing entities that together form the United States — states, the District of Columbia, territories and indian reservations.

The primary first-level political (administrative) division of the United States is the state. There are 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory, and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. According to numerous decisions of the United States Supreme Court, the 50 individual states and the United States as a whole are each sovereign jurisdictions.All state governments are modeled after the federal government and consist of three branches (although the three-branch structure is not Constitutionally required): executive, legislative, and judicial. They retain plenary power to make laws covering anything not preempted by the U.S. Constitution, federal statutes, or treaties ratified by the U.S. Senate, and are organized as presidential systems where the governor is both head of government and head of state (even though this too is not required). The various states are then typically subdivided into counties. Louisiana uses the term parish and Alaska uses the term borough for what the Census terms county equivalents in those states.

Counties and county equivalents may be further subdivided into townships. Towns in New York, Wisconsin and New England are treated as equivalents to townships by the United States Census Bureau. Townships or towns are used as subdivisions of a county in 20 states, mostly in the Northeast and Midwest.Population centers may be organized into incorporated cities, towns, villages, and other types of municipalities. Municipalities are typically subordinate to a county government, with some exceptions. Certain cities, for example, have consolidated with their county government as consolidated city-counties. In Virginia, cities are completely independent from the county in which they would otherwise be a part. In some states, particularly in New England, towns form the primary unit of local government below the state level, in some cases eliminating the need for county government entirely.

The government of each of the five permanently inhabited U.S. territories is also modeled and organized after the federal government. Each is further subdivided into smaller entities. Puerto Rico has 78 municipalities, and the Northern Mariana Islands has 4 municipalities. Guam has villages, the U.S. Virgin Islands has districts, and American Samoa has districts and unorganized atolls.Other U.S. sub-national divisions include the District of Columbia, several minor outlying islands, and Indian reservations, all of which are administered by the Federal government. Each Indian Reservation is subdivided in various ways. For example, the Navajo Nation is subdivided into agencies and Chapter houses, while the Blackfeet Nation is subdivided into Communities. The Federal government also maintains exclusive jurisdiction over military installations and American embassies and consulates located in foreign countries. Other special purpose divisions exist separately from those for general governance, examples of which include conservation districts and Congressional districts.

According to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service,

Federal and state governments are established and recognized by the U.S. Constitution and state constitutions. Federally recognized Indian tribal governments are recognized by the U.S. Constitution, treaties, statutes and court decisions. Other entities may be recognized as governments by state law, court decision, or an examination of facts and circumstances that indicate it has the characteristics of a government, such as powers of taxation, law enforcement and civil authority.

Southwest Washington

Southwest Washington is a geographical area of the State of Washington, comprising roughly half of Western Washington. It generally includes the Olympia area south to Vancouver at the Oregon-Washington state line. Olympia has been a transshipment center for Southwest Washington since its settlement in the mid 19th century.

Texas Coastal Bend

The Texas Coastal Bend, or just the Coastal Bend, is a geographical region in the US state of Texas. The name refers to the area being a curve along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The largest city of the Coastal Bend is Corpus Christi. It includes part of Laguna Madre and North Padre Island, as well as Mustang Island.

The Coastal Bend consists of 9 counties: Aransas, Bee, Brooks, Jim Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, Nueces, Refugio, and San Patricio Counties.

Regions of the United States
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United States political regions
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