List of novae in the Milky Way galaxy

This is a partial list of novae in the Milky Way galaxy that have been discovered and recorded since 1891. Novae are stars that undergo dramatic explosions, but unlike supernovae, these do not result in the destruction of the original star. The likely rate of novae in the Milky Way is about 40 per year,[1] but of these only about 10 per year are discovered by observers as of the 2000s (decade).[2] This list attempts to include only the brighter or more notable novae.

The Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBAT) maintains a more complete list of novae in the Milky Way since 1612.[2]

For a list of novae in individual years, see instead: novae in 2018, novae in 2019.

Nomenclature

Novae are initially designated via a "Nova [genitive form of constellation name] [year of discovery]" format, e.g. "Nova Cygni 1974" and "Nova Scorpii 2010". An official permanent name is usually soon assigned by the General Catalog of Variable Stars using the GCVS format for the naming of variable stars. When more than one nova is discovered in a constellation in one year, a numeric suffix is appended; hence "Nova Sagittarii 2011 #2", "Nova Sagitarii 2011 #3", etc.

Nova-Eridani-2009-LB4
Nova Eridani 2009 (apparent magnitude ~8.4) during a full moon
Year Nova Maximum brightness[note 1]
1612 04550 Leonis +4.0
1670 CK Vulpeculae +2.6
1673 03846 Puppis +3.0
1678 V529 Orionis +6
1783 WY Sagittae +6
1848 V841 Ophiuchi +2.0
1853 00856 Trianguli +9.5
1853 SZ Persei +9.5
1854 SU Arietis +3.0
1854 U Leonis +10.5
1860 T Bootis +9.7
1860 T Scorpii +7.0
1862 V728 Scorpii +5.0
1863 U Scorpii +8.8
1866 T Coronae Borealis +2.0
1876 Q Cygni +3.0
1877 AB Bootis +4.5
1887 V Persei +4.0
1891 T Aurigae +3.8
1898 V1059 Sagittarii +4.5
1899 V606 Aquilae +5.5
1901 GK Persei +0.2
1903 DM Geminorum +4.8
1905 V604 Aquilae +7.3
1910 DI Lacertae +4.6
1912 DN Geminorum +3.5
1918 V603 Aquilae -0.5
1919 HR Lyrae +6.5
1919 V849 Ophiuchi +7.4
1920 V476 Cygni +2.0
1920 T Pyxidis +6.4
1925 RR Pictoris +1.2[3]
1927 EL Aquilae +5.5
1927 XX Tauri +5.9
1933 RS Ophiuchi +4.3
1934 DQ Herculis +1.4
1936 CP Lacertae +2.1
1936 V368 Aquilae +5.0
1939 BT Monocerotis +4.5
1942 V450 Cygni +7.0
1942 CP Puppis +0.3
1943 V500 Aquilae +6.1
1944 T Pyxidis +7.1
1945 V528 Aquilae +7.0
1946 T Coronae Borealis +3.0
1948 CT Serpentis +6.0
1948 V465 Cygni +7.3
1950 DK Lacertae +5.0
1956 RW Ursae Minoris +6.0[4]
1958 RS Ophiuchi +5.0
1960 V446 Herculis +2.8
1963 V533 Herculis +3.0
1964 QZ Aurigae +6.0
1967 T Pyxidis +6.7
1967 HR Delphini +3.7
1967 RS Ophiuchi +5.0
1968 LV Vulpeculae +5.2
1970 FH Serpentis +4.4
1970 V1229 Aquilae +6.7
1970 V1330 Cygni +7.5
1971 IV Cephei +7.0
1975 V1500 Cygni +1.7
1975 V373 Scuti +6.0
1976 NQ Vulpeculae +6.0
1977 HS Sagittae +7.2
1978 V1668 Cygni +6.0
1982 V1370 Aquilae +6.0
1984 PW Vulpeculae +6.4
1984 QU Vulpeculae +5.2
1985 RS Ophiuchi +5.4
1986 V842 Centauri +4.6
1986 OS Andromedae +6.3
1987 V827 Herculis +7.5
1987 QV Vulpeculae +7.0
1991 V838 Herculis +5.0
1992 V1974 Cygni +4.2
1993 V705 Cassiopeiae +5.8
1999 V382 Velorum +2.6
1999 V1494 Aquilae +4.0
2000 V445 Puppis +8.6
2002 V4743 Sagittarii +5.0[5]
2006 RS Ophiuchi +4.5
2007 V1280 Scorpii +3.9[6][7]
2009 KT Eridani +5.5
2013 V339 Delphini +4.3[8]
2013 V1369 Centauri +3.3[9]
2015 V5668 Sagittarii +4.0[10][11]
2016 V407 Lupi +5.6[12]
2016 V5856 Sagittarii +5.5[13]
2018 ASASSN-18fv +5.9[14]
2018 V392 Persei +6.2[15]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ A higher magnitude means a lower brightness. i.e. T Aurigae (+3.8) was a brighter nova than HR Lyrae (+6.5)

References

  1. ^ Prialnik, Dina. "Novae", pp. 1846-56, in Paul Murdin, ed. Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics. London: Institute of Physics Publishing Ltd and Nature Publishing Group, 2001. ISBN 1-56159-268-4
  2. ^ a b CBAT List of Novae in the Milky Way discovered since 1612
  3. ^ Burnham, Robert (2013) [1977]. Burnham's Celestial Handbook, Volume Three: An Observer's Guide to the Universe Beyond the Solar System. New York, New York: Courier Dover Publications. pp. 1460–62. ISBN 9780486318035.
  4. ^ Bianchini, A.; Tappert, C.; Canterna, R.; Tamburini, F.; Osborne, H.; Cantrell, K. "RW Ursae Minoris (1956): An Evolving Postnova System". The Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 115 (809): 811–18. Bibcode:2003PASP..115..811B. doi:10.1086/376434.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  5. ^ https://www.aavso.org/vsx/index.php?view=detail.top&oid=32443
  6. ^ http://www.aavso.org/publications/alerts/alert346.shtml
  7. ^ http://www.aavso.org/cgi-bin/newql.pl?name=V1280%20Sco&output=html
  8. ^ "Light Curve Generator: AAVSO Data for Nova DEL 2013". American Association of Variable Star Observers. August 16, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2013.
  9. ^ IAU Circ., 9266, 2 (2013). Edited by Green, D. W. E.
  10. ^ CBET 4080 (March 20, 2015)
  11. ^ Alan MacRobert Nova Sagittarii: What a Long, Strange Fade It’s Been Sky and Telescope April 29, 2015
  12. ^ https://www.aavso.org/vsx/index.php?view=detail.top&oid=474105
  13. ^ https://www.aavso.org/vsx/index.php?view=detail.top&oid=474768
  14. ^ https://www.aavso.org/aavso-alert-notice-626
  15. ^ http://www.popastro.com/main_spa1/blog/2018/04/30/nova-in-perseus/

External links

KT Eridani

KT Eridani was a bright nova, which produced an outburst in 2009 in the constellation Eridanus. It was discovered on 2009 November 25 by K. Itagaki at Yamagata, Japan. It was first called Nova Eridani 2009 and is located at 04h 47m 54.21s −10° 10′ 43.1″. In the most common nova systems, the white dwarf accretes matter from a main sequence star. However, in KT Eri is thought to have a red giant companion star.

Nova Centauri 2013

Nova Cen 2013 or V1369 Cen (PNV J13544700-5909080) was a bright nova in the constellation Centaurus. It was discovered on December 2, 2013 by amateur astronomer John Seach in Australia with a magnitude of 5.5.

On December 14, 2013 it peaked at about magnitude 3.3, making it the brightest nova so far of this millennium.Nova Centauri 2013 was observed emitting gamma-rays between 7–10 December 2013 by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The nova continued to brighten in gamma-rays and the peak coincided with the second optical maximum on 11 December 2013.The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission detected X-ray emission from Nova Centauri 2013 on 18 and 25 February 2014 and 8 March 2014.In July 2015 it was announced that lithium has been detected in material ejected from Nova Centauri 2013. This is the first time lithium has been detected in a nova system. The amount detected was less than a billionth of the mass of the Sun. This finding is significant because it supports a theory that the extra lithium found in Population I stars (compared to Population II stars) comes from novae.

Nova Muscae 2018

Nova Muscae 2018 (formerly PNV J11261220-6531086) is a bright nova in the constellation Musca, right ascension 11h 26m 15.16s, declination −65° 31′ 23.3″ (J2000.0). It was discovered on January 14, 2018 by Rob Kaufman of Bright, Victoria, Australia with a magnitude of 7.0.As well as being observed optically, the nova was also detected at radio wavelengths using the Australia Telescope Compact Array.

Nova Persei 2018

Nova Persei 2018 is a bright nova in the constellation Perseus discovered on April 29, 2018. It was previously known as a dwarf nova with variable star designation V392 Persei.

V339 Delphini

V339 Delphini or Nova Delphini 2013 (PNV J20233073+2046041) is a bright nova star in the constellation Delphinus. It was discovered on 14 August 2013 by amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki in Japan and confirmed by the Liverpool Telescope on La Palma. The nova appeared with a magnitude 6.8 when it was discovered and peaked at magnitude 4.3 on 16 August 2013. A nova is produced by the fusion of accumulated material on the white dwarf nova progenitor acquired from its companion star. The nova system is thus a binary star, and a classical nova.V339 Del is the first nova that has been observed to synthesize the element lithium. Production of lithium-7 from the decay of beryllium-7, which was observed in the wind blown out of the nova. This is the first direct evidence of the supply of lithium to the interstellar medium by an astronomical object. Lithium-7 is fragile in the environment at the center of a nova, so being blown out of the environment at the center is necessary for the observation of lithium. The beryllium was produced by the fusion of helium-3 with helium-4. Nucleosynthesis of lithium is important in the study of chemical abundances in the universe.

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