List of nearest bright stars

This list of nearest bright stars is a table of stars found within 15 parsecs (48.9 light-years) of the Sun that have an absolute magnitude of +8.5 or brighter, which is approximately comparable to a listing of stars more luminous than a red dwarf. Right ascension and declination coordinates are for the epoch J2000. The distance measurements are based on the Hipparcos Catalogue and other astrometric data. In the event of a spectroscopic binary, the combined spectral type and absolute magnitude are listed in italics.

The list is ordered by increasing distance.

3 Solar Interstellar Neighborhood (ELitU)
Prominent stars in the neighborhood of the Sun (center)

Stars within 10 parsecs

These stars are estimated to be within 32.6 light years of the Sun.

Star Designation Stellar
Class
Magnitude Right
Ascension

(J2000)
Declination (J2000) Distance
(Light Years)
Apparent Absolute
Sun G2V −26.74 4.80 0
α Centauri A G2V −0.01  4.34  14h 39m 36.50s −60° 50′ 02.3″ 4.37
B K1V 1.35 5.71  14h 39m 35.08s −60° 50′ 13.8″
Sirius (α Canis Majoris) A1V −1.44 1.45  06h 45m 08.92s −16° 42′ 58.0″ 8.60
ε Eridani K2V 3.72 6.18  03h 32m 55.84s −09° 27′ 29.7″ 10.5
61 Cygni A K5.0V 5.20 7.49  21h 06m 53.94s +38° 44′ 57.9″ 11.4
B K7.0V 6.05 8.33
Procyon (α Canis Minoris) A F5IV-V 0.40 2.68  07h 39m 18.12s +05° 13′ 30.0″ 11.5
ε Indi K5Ve 4.69 6.90  22h 03m 21.66s −56° 47′ 09.5″ 11.8
τ Ceti G8Vp 3.49 5.68  01h 44m 04.08s −15° 56′ 14.9″ 11.9
Groombridge 1618 (in Ursa Major) K7.0V 6.60 8.16  10h 11m 22.14s +49° 27′ 15.3″ 15.9
ο2 Eridani A K1Ve 4.43 5.92  04h 15m 16.32s −07° 39′ 10.3″ 16.3
70 Ophiuchi A K1Ve 4.24 5.71  18h 05m 27.29s +02° 30′ 00.4″ 16.6
B K5Ve 6.01 7.48
Altair (α Aquilae) A7IV-V 0.76 2.21  19h 50m 47.00s +08° 52′ 06.0″ 16.7
σ Draconis G9V 4.67 5.87  19h 32m 21.59s +69° 39′ 40.2″ 18.8
Gliese 570 (in Libra) K5Ve 5.72 6.86  14h 57m 28.00s −21° 24′ 55.7″ 19.0
η Cassiopeiae A G3V 3.46 4.59  00h 49m 06.29s +57° 48′ 54.7″ 19.4
36 Ophiuchi A K1Ve 5.07 6.18  17h 15m 20.98s −26° 36′ 10.2″ 19.5
B K1Ve 5.11 6.22
C K5Ve 6.33 7.45  17h 16m 13.36s −26° 32′ 46.1″
HR 7703 (in Sagittarius) A K3V 5.32 6.42  20h 11m 11.94s −36° 06′ 04.4″ 19.6
82 G. Eridani G8V 4.26 5.35  03h 19m 55.65s −43° 04′ 11.2″ 19.7
δ Pavonis G7IV 3.55 4.62  20h 08m 42.61s −66° 10′ 55.4″ 19.9
HR 8832 / Gliese 892 (in Cassiopeia) K3V 5.57 6.49  23h 13m 16.98s +57° 10′ 06.1″ 21.4
ξ Boötis A G8Ve 4.72 5.59  14h 51m 23.38s +19° 06′ 01.7″ 21.9
B K4Ve 6.97 7.84
Gliese 667 (in Scorpius) A K3V 6.29 7.07  17h 18m 57.18s −34° 59′ 23.3″ 23.2
B K5V 7.24 8.02
Gliese 105 (in Cetus) A K3V 5.79 6.50  02h 36m 04.89s +06° 53′ 12.7″ 23.4
HD 4628 (in Pisces) K2V 5.74 6.38  00h 48m 22.98s +05° 16′ 50.2″ 24.3
β Hydri G2IV 2.82 3.46  00h 25m 45.07s −77° 15′ 15.2″ 24.3
107 Piscium K1V 5.24 5.86  01h 42m 29.76s +20° 16′ 06.6″ 24.4
μ Cassiopeiae A G5VI 5.17 5.78  01h 08m 16.39s +54° 55′ 13.2″ 24.6
Fomalhaut (α Piscis Austrini/α PsA) B K5Ve 6.48 7.07  22h 56m 24.05s −31° 33′ 56.0″ 24.8
Vega (α Lyrae) A0Va 0.03 0.58  18h 36m 56.34s +38° 47′ 01.3″ 25.0
Fomalhaut (α Piscis Austrini/α PsA) A A3V 1.17 1.74  22h 57m 39.05s −29° 37′ 20.1″ 25.1
Gliese 673 (in Ophiuchus) K7V 7.54 8.10  17h 25m 45.23s +02° 06′ 41.1″ 25.1
p Eridani A K0V 5.82 6.27  01h 39m 47.54s −56° 11′ 47.0″ 25.5
B K5V 5.95 6.40
π3 Orionis F6V 3.19 3.67  04h 49m 50.41s +06° 57′ 40.6″ 26.3
χ Draconis A F7V 3.68 4.15  18h 21m 03.38s +72° 43′ 58.2″ 26.3
B K0V 5.67 6.14
Gliese 884 (see List of stars in Aquarius) K5 7.88 8.33  23h 00m 16.12s −22° 31′ 27.6″ 26.6
μ Herculis G5IV 3.42 3.80  17h 46m 27.53s +27° 43′ 14.4″ 27.1
β Canum Venaticorum G0V 4.24 4.63  12h 33m 44.54s +41° 21′ 26.9″ 27.5
61 Virginis G5V 4.74 5.09  13h 18m 24.31s −18° 18′ 40.3″ 27.9
ζ Tucanae F9V 4.23 4.56  00h 20m 04.26s −64° 52′ 29.2″ 28.0
χ1 Orionis A G0V 4.39 4.70  05h 54m 22.98s +20° 16′ 34.2″ 28.3
HD 50281 (in Monoceros) A K3V 6.58 6.88  06h 52m 18.05s −05° 10′ 25.4″ 28.4
HR 1614 (284 G. Eridani) A K3V 6.22 6.49  05h 00m 49.00s −05° 45′ 13.2″ 28.4
41 G. Arae A G8V 5.55 5.83  17h 19m 03.83s −46° 38′ 10.4″ 28.7
ξ Ursae Majoris A G0V 4.41 4.25  11h 18m 11s +31° 31′ 45″ 28.8
B G5V 4.87 5.07
HD 192310/Gliese 785 (5 G. Capricorni) K2+V 5.73 6.00  20h 15m 7.39s −27° 01′ 58.7″ 29.1
γ Leporis A F7V 3.59 3.83  05h 44m 27.79s −22° 26′ 54.2″ 29.3
B K2V 6.17 6.41
δ Eridani K0IV 3.52 3.74  03h 43m 14.90s −09° 45′ 48.2″ 29.5
Groombridge 1830 (in Ursa Major) G8Vp 6.42 6.61  11h 52m 58.77s +37° 43′ 07.2″ 29.7
β Comae Berenices G0V 4.23 4.42  13h 11m 52.39s +27° 52′ 41.5″ 29.8
κ1 Ceti G5V 4.84 5.03  03h 19m 21.70s +03° 22′ 12.7″ 29.8
HD 102365 (in Centaurus) A G3V 4.89 5.06  11h 46m 31.07s −40° 30′ 01.3″ 30.1
γ Pavonis F6V 4.21 4.39  21h 26m 26.61s −65° 21′ 58.3″ 30.2
61 Ursae Majoris G8V 5.31 5.41  11h 41m 03.02s +34° 12′ 05.9″ 31.1
HR 4458 (in Hydra) A K0V 5.96 6.06  11h 34m 29.49s −32° 49′ 52.8″ 31.2
12 Ophiuchi K2V 5.77 5.82  16h 36m 21.45s −02° 19′ 28.5″ 31.8
Gliese 638 (in Hercules) K7V 8.10 8.15  16h 45m 06.35s +33° 30′ 33.2″ 31.9

Stars between 10 and 13 parsecs

These stars are estimated to be from 32.7 to 42.4 light years distant from the Sun.

Star Designation Stellar
Class
Magnitude Right
Ascension

(J2000)
Declination (J2000) Distance
(Light Years)
Apparent Absolute
HR 511 K0V 5.63 5.64  01h 47m 44.83s +63° 51′ 09.0″ 32.8
HR 5256 K3V 6.49 6.47  13h 57m 32.06s +61° 29′ 34.3″ 33.0
α Mensae G5V 5.08 5.05  06h 10m 13.93s −74° 45′ 11.0″ 33.1
Gliese 453 K4V 6.99 6.95  11h 57m 57.63s −27° 42′ 25.4″ 33.2
Pollux K0IIIb 1.16 1.09  07h 45m 18.95s +28° 01′ 34.3″ 33.7
HD 17925 (32 G. Eridani) K1V 6.05 5.97  02h 52m 31.65s −12° 46′ 11.0″ 33.9
ι Persei G0V 4.05 3.94  03h 09m 04.02s +49° 36′ 47.8″ 34.4
Wolf 635 A K7 V 7.70 7.54  17h 05m 04.47s −05° 03′ 59.4″ 35.1
HR 9038 A K3V 6.36 6.19  23h 52m 25.32s +75° 32′ 40.5″ 35.2
ζ Herculis A F9IV 2.91 2.74  16h 41m 17.16s +31° 36′ 09.8″ 35.2
B G7V 5.43 5.26
δ Trianguli G0V 4.84 4.66  02h 17m 03.23s +34° 13′ 27.2″ 35.4
β Virginis F8V 3.59 3.40  11h 50m 41.72s +01° 45′ 53.0″ 35.6
Gliese 86 A K0V 6.12 5.93  02h 10m 22.07s −50° 49′ 25.4″ 35.6
Gliese 688 A K3V 6.53 6.38  17h 39m 16.92s +03° 33′ 18.9″ 35.9
HR 6806 K2V 6.38 6.15  18h 09m 37.42s +38° 27′ 28.0″ 36.0
Gliese 505 A K1V 6.52 6.27  13h 16m 51.05s +17° 01′ 01.8″ 36.1
Denebola A3Vvar 2.14 1.92  11h 49m 03.58s +14° 34′ 19.4″ 36.2
54 Piscium K0V 5.88 5.65  00h 39m 21.81s +21° 15′ 01.7″ 36.2
γ Serpentis F6V 3.85 3.62  15h 56m 27.18s +15° 39′ 41.8″ 36.3
Gliese 320 K2V 6.58 6.35  08h 43m 18.48s −38° 52′ 56.6″ 36.3
Gliese 370 K5V 7.67 7.43  09h 51m 06.31s −43° 30′ 10.0″ 36.4
11 Leonis Minoris A G8V 5.40 5.16  09h 35m 39.50s +35° 48′ 36.5″ 36.5
θ Persei A F7V 4.10 3.85  02h 44m 11.99s +49° 13′ 42.4″ 36.6
Arcturus (α Boötis) K1.5III −0.05 −0.31  14h 15m 39.67s +19° 10′ 56.7″ 36.7
η Boötis A/B G0IV 2.68 2.41  13h 54m 41.08s +18° 23′ 51.8″ 37.0
Gliese 902 K3V 7.09 6.81  23h 39m 36.83s −72° 43′ 19.8″ 37.2
Gliese 169 K7V 8.30 8.00  04h 29m 00.12s +21° 55′ 21.7″ 37.4
HR 5553 A/B K2V 6.00 5.69  14h 53m 23.77s +19° 09′ 10.1″ 37.6
ζ Doradus A F7V 4.71 4.38  05h 05m 30.72s −57° 28′ 21.7″ 38.0
λ Serpentis G0Vvar 4.42 4.07  15h 46m 26.61s +07° 21′ 11.1″ 38.3
ι Pegasi A/B F5V 3.77 3.42  22h 07m 00.67s +25° 20′ 42.4″ 38.3
δ Capricorni A A5IV 2.73−2.93 2.37  21h 47m 02.13s −16° 07′ 38.2″ 38.6
γ Virginis A F0V 3.46 3.10  12h 41m 40.36s −01° 26′ 57.7″ 38.6
B F0V 3.52 3.16
Gliese 542 K3V 6.66 6.29  14h 19m 05.88s −59° 22′ 44.5″ 38.6
ζ2 Reticuli G1V 5.24 4.83  03h 18m 09.45s −62° 30′ 22.9″ 39.4
ζ Trianguli Australis F9V 4.91 4.50  16h 28m 27.46s −70° 05′ 03.8″ 39.5
ζ1 Reticuli G2V 5.53 5.11  03h 17m 42.77s −62° 34′ 31.2″ 39.5
HR 3384 G9V 6.38 5.95  08h 32m 52.91s −31° 30′ 03.1″ 39.8
V538 Aurigae K1Ve 6.21 5.77  05h 41m 20.33s +53° 28′ 51.8″ 39.9
β Trianguli Australis A F2III 2.83 2.38  15h 55m 08.92s −63° 25′ 50.6″ 40.1
85 Pegasi A G3V 5.81 5.34  00h 02m 10.10s +27° 04′ 56.1″ 40.5
B K6V 8.88 8.41
Gliese 435 (es) K5V 7.77 7.28  11h 41m 03.55s −44° 24′ 18.7″ 40.8
ρ1 Cancri A G8V 5.96 5.47  08h 52m 35.85s +28° 19′ 50.9″ 40.9
HD 69830 (285 G. Puppis) K0V 5.95 5.45  08h 18m 23.62s −12° 37′ 55.8″ 41.0
Gliese 67 A G1.5V 4.95 4.30  01h 41m 47.1s +42° 36′ 48.1″ 41.2
λ Aurigae G0V 4.69 4.18  05h 19m 08.38s +40° 05′ 56.6″ 41.2
HD 14412 (22 G. Fornacis) G8V 6.33 5.81  02h 18m 58.77s −25° 56′ 44.5″ 41.3
44 Boötis A F9V 5.20 4.67  15h 03m 47.43s +47° 39′ 14.6″ 41.6
B/C G2 V 5.97 5.44
Gliese 675 K0V 6.44 5.90  17h 25m 00.59s +67° 18′ 24.1″ 41.7
Gliese 2046 K3V 7.17 6.63  05h 54m 04.33s −60° 01′ 24.5″ 41.8
36 Ursae Majoris A F8V 4.82 4.28  10h 30m 37.66s +55° 58′ 49.9″ 41.9
HD 147513 (62 G. Scorpii) G3V 5.37 4.82  16h 24m 01.19s −39° 11′ 34.7″ 42.0
Gliese 428 (it) A K7V 7.51 6.96  11h 24m 41.24s −61° 38′ 51.2″ 42.0
B M0Ve 8.82 8.27
HD 104304 (24 G. Virginis) K0IV 5.54 4.99  12h 00m 44.28s −10° 26′ 45.7″ 42.1
Gliese 349 (es) K3V 7.20 6.68  09h 29m 54.82s +05° 39′ 18.5″ 42.1
Capella Aa G5III 0.76 0.20  05h 16m 41.34s +45° 59′ 52.8″ 42.2
Ab G1III 0.91 0.35
HD 172051 (86 G. Sagittarii) G5V 5.85 5.28  18h 38m 53.49s −21° 03′ 06.7″ 42.3

Stars between 13 and 15 parsecs

These stars are estimated to be from 42.5 to 48.9 light years distant from the Sun. A value of 48.9 light years corresponds to a minimum parallax of 66.7 mas.

Star Designation Stellar
Class
Magnitude Right
Ascension

(J2000)
Declination (J2000) Distance
(Light Years)
Apparent Absolute
HD 36003 K5V 7.65 7.08  05h 28m 26s −03° 29′ 58″ 42.5
HD 166348 K7V 8.23 7.65  18h 12m 21s −43° 26′ 41″ 42.6
Gliese 204 K5V 8.23 7.65  05h 28m 26s −03° 29′ 58″ 42.6
Gliese 167 K5V 7.62 7.03  04h 15m 57s −53° 18′ 35″ 42.8
SZ Crateris A K5V 8.61 8.0  11h 21m 27s −20° 27′ 14″ 42.9
Gliese 716 K2V 6.81 6.21  18h 31m 19s −18° 54′ 30″ 43.1
Gliese 146 K5V 8.95 8.34  03h 35m 01s −48° 25′ 09″ 43.1
V1654 Aquilae K4V 7.45 6.84  20h 02m 47s +03° 19′ 34″ 43.1
Gliese 69 K5V 8.35 7.74  01h 43m 41s +63° 49′ 24″ 43.1
58 Eridani G1V 5.63 5.01  04h 47m 36s −16° 56′ 04″ 43.4
Gliese 528 A K4V 7.96 7.32  13h 49m 04s +26° 58′ 47″ 43.7
B dK6 8.35 7.71
υ Andromedae F7V 3.51 2.86  01h 36m 48s +41° 24′ 20″ 43.9
Gliese 556 K3V 7.32 6.67  14h 33m 29s +52° 54′ 32″ 44.0
θ Ursae Majoris F6IV 3.02 2.37  09h 32m 52s +51° 40′ 43″ 44.0
LHS 3508 K5V 7.91 7.24  20h 02m 35s −50° 03′ 06″ 44.3
V834 Tau K3V 8.03 7.36  04h 41m 19s +20° 54′ 05″ 44.4
Gliese 853 A G1-3V 5.33 4.66  22h 18m 15s −53° 37′ 32″ 44.4
Gliese 868 K5V 7.93 7.25  22h 40m 43s −29° 40′ 28″ 44.5
Gliese 5 G8V 5.92 5.23  00h 06m 37s +29° 01′ 19″ 44.7
β Aquilae A G8IV 3.75 3.06  19h 55m 19s +06° 24′ 29″ 44.7
10 Tauri F9V 4.29 3.60  03h 36m 53s +00° 24′ 10″ 44.7
Gliese 656 K0V 7.28 6.58  17h 10m 10s −60° 43′ 44″ 44.9
ι Piscium F7V 4.06 3.36  23h 39m 57s +05° 37′ 38″ 45.0
γ Cephei A K1IV 2.94 2.24  23h 39m 21s +77° 37′ 56″ 45.0
Gliese 615 K0V 7.36 6.66  16h 13m 49s −57° 34′ 14″ 45.1
Gliese 898 K5/M0V 8.38 7.68  23h 32m 49s −16° 50′ 44″ 45.1
HD 23356 K2V 7.1 6.4  03h 43m 56s −19° 06′ 42″ 45.2
36 Ursae Majoris B K7Ve 8.77 8.06  10h 30m 25s +56° 00′ 00″ 45.2
18 Scorpii G1V 5.50 4.76  16h 15m 37s −08° 22′ 06″ 45.3
τ1 Eridani A/B F5/F6V 4.47 3.74  02h 45m 06s −18° 34′ 22″ 45.5
Gliese 529 K5.5Vk 8.36 7.62  13h 49m 45s −22° 06′ 40″ 45.9
Gliese 726 K5 8.91 8.17  18h 47m 27s −03° 38′ 23″ 45.9
Gliese 282 A K2V 7.26 6.52  07h 39m 59s −03° 35′ 51″ 45.9
B K5 9.02 8.28
47 Ursae Majoris G0V 5.03 4.29  10h 59m 28s +40° 25′ 48″ 45.9
Gliese 532 K5 8.99 8.24  13h 52m 00s +49° 57′ 03″ 46.0
26 Draconis A F9V 5.06 4.31  17h 34m 60s +61° 52′ 30″ 46.0
B K3V 7.95 7.20
α Fornacis A F7IV 3.80 3.05  03h 12m 04s −28° 59′ 21″ 46.0
B G7V 6.73 5.98
Gliese 42 K2V 7.48 6.72  00h 53m 01s −30° 21′ 25″ 46.2
Gliese 481 K4V 7.91 7.13  12h 41m 06s +15° 22′ 36″ 46.2
Gliese 611 A G8V 6.71 5.94  16h 04m 57s +39° 09′ 23″ 46.4
HD 150689 K2V 7.39 6.62  16h 44m 14s −38° 56′ 36″ 46.4
HR 7578 K3V 6.23 5.46  19h 54m 18s −23° 56′ 28″ 46.4
π1 Ursae Majoris G1V 5.63 4.86  08h 39m 12s +65° 01′ 15″ 46.6
Ras Alhague A A5III 2.08 1.30  17h 34m 56s +12° 33′ 36″ 46.7
η Cephei K0IV 3.42 2.63  20h 45m 17s +61° 50′ 20″ 46.8
Gliese 613 K3V 7.12 6.33  16h 09m 43s −56° 26′ 46″ 46.8
72 Herculis G0V 5.38 4.59  17h 20m 39s +32° 28′ 13″ 46.9
Gliese 796 G8V 6.37 5.58  20h 40m 12s −23° 46′ 24″ 46.9
Gliese 481 K2 7.86 7.07  12h 41m 06s +15° 22′ 36″ 47.0
Gliese 546 K5V 8.37 7.57  14h 21m 57s +29° 37′ 47″ 47.1
Gliese 420 dK5 8.06 7.26  11h 15m 12s +73° 28′ 31″ 47.1
ν2 Lupi G2V 5.66 4.84  15h 21m 48s −48° 19′ 04″ 47.5
θ Boötis A F7V 4.10 3.28  14h 25m 12s +51° 51′ 06″ 47.5
it:Gliese 269 A K2V 8.08 7.26  07h 17m 30s −46° 58′ 45″ 47.6
Gliese 833 K2V 7.31 6.48  21h 36m 41s −50° 50′ 43″ 47.7
ι Ursae Majoris A A7V 3.23 2.40  08h 59m 13s +48° 02′ 32″ 47.7
Gliese 259 K1V 6.88 6.05  07h 01m 14s −25° 56′ 55″ 47.7
111 Tauri A F8V 5.00 4.17  05h 24m 25s +17° 23′ 00″ 47.8
B dK5e 7.83 7.00  05h 23m 38s +17° 19′ 27″
ψ Serpentis G5V 5.86 5.03  15h 44m 02s +02° 30′ 55″ 47.8
Gliese 604 K5V 8.05 7.22  15h 57m 41s −42° 37′ 27″ 47.8
ψ Capricorni F5V 4.14 3.30  20h 46m 06s −25° 16′ 14″ 47.9
HD 97584 A K4V 7.68 6.85  11h 15m 12s +73° 28′ 31″ 47.9
OU Geminorum K2Ve 6.76 5.91  06h 26m 10s +18° 45′ 25″ 48.2
α Corvi F2V 4.02 3.17  12h 08m 25s −24° 43′ 44″ 48.2
20 Leonis Minoris A G3Va 5.40 4.50  10h 01m 01s +31° 55′ 25″ 48.6
AB Doradus A K1Vp 6.98  05h 28m 45s −65° 26′ 55″ 48.7
ν Phoenicis F8V 4.57 3.70  01h 15m 11s −45° 31′ 54″ 48.7
Gliese 1021 G5V 5.80 4.93  00h 45m 45s −47° 33′ 06″ 48.7
Gliese 52 K7V 8.98 8.10  01h 07m 09s +63° 56′ 30″ 48.8
Gliese 1279 K5V 8.50 7.62  23h 09m 41s −67° 44′ 00″ 48.8
Alderamin A7IV-V 2.45 1.58  21h 18m 35s +62° 35′ 08″ 48.8
Gliese 738 A G0V 6.22 5.34  18h 57m 02s +32° 54′ 05″ 48.9
B K1V 7.53 6.65

See also

References

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  • de Mello, G. F. Porto; del Peloso, E. F. & Ghezzi, L. (April 2006). "Astrobiologically interesting stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun". Astrobiology. 6 (2): 308–331. arXiv:astro-ph/0511180. Bibcode:2006AsBio...6..308P. doi:10.1089/ast.2006.6.308. PMID 16689649.
  • Gray, R. O.; et al. (July 2006). "Contributions to the Nearby Stars (NStars) Project: Spectroscopy of Stars Earlier than M0 within 40 pc-The Southern Sample". The Astronomical Journal. 132 (1): 161–170. arXiv:astro-ph/0603770. Bibcode:2006AJ....132..161G. doi:10.1086/504637.
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  • Mamajek, Eric E.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. (November 2008). "Improved Age Estimation for Solar-Type Dwarfs Using Activity-Rotation Diagnostics". The Astrophysical Journal. 687 (2): 1264–1293. arXiv:0807.1686. Bibcode:2008ApJ...687.1264M. doi:10.1086/591785. Note: this is a "volume-limited" sample of stars within 16 parsecs of the Sun.
  • Pasinetti Fracassini, L. E.; Pastori, L.; Covino, S.; Pozzi, A. (February 2001). "Catalogue of Apparent Diameters and Absolute Radii of Stars (CADARS)". Astronomy and Astrophysics (Third ed.). 367: 521–524. arXiv:astro-ph/0012289. Bibcode:2001A&A...367..521P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20000451. Note: see VizieR catalogue J/A+A/367/521.
  • Perryman, Michael (2010), "The Making of History's Greatest Star Map", Astronomers' Universe, Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, doi:10.1007/978-3-642-11602-5
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  • Valenti, Jeff A.; Fischer, Debra A. (July 2005). "Spectroscopic Properties of Cool Stars (SPOCS). I. 1040 F, G, and K Dwarfs from Keck, Lick, and AAT Planet Search Programs". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. 159 (1): 141–166. Bibcode:2005ApJS..159..141V. doi:10.1086/430500. Note: see VizieR catalogie J/ApJS/159/141.
  • van Leeuwen, Floor (2007). Hipparcos, the new Reduction of the Raw data. Astrophysics and Space Science Library. 350. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. ISBN 978-1-4020-6341-1. Note: see VizieR catalogue I/311.

External links

58 Eridani

58 Eridani is a main-sequence star in the constellation Eridanus. It is considered a solar analogue, which means it has similar physical properties to the Sun. The star has a relatively high proper motion across the sky, and it is located about 43 light years distant. It is a probable member of the IC 2391 moving group of stars that share a common motion through space.This is a BY Draconis variable with the designation IX Eridani, which ranges in magnitude from 5.47 down to 5.51 with a period of 11.3 days. The X-ray emissions from this star's corona indicate an age of less than a billion (109) years, compared to 4.6 billion for the Sun, so it is still relatively young for a star of its mass. Starspot activity has also been detected, which varies from year to year.

A circumstellar disc of dust particles has been detected

in orbit around 58 Eridani.

Alpha Cephei

Alpha Cephei (α Cephei, abbreviated Alpha Cep, α Cep), officially named Alderamin , is a second magnitude star in the constellation of Cepheus near the northern pole. The star is relatively close to Earth at 49 light years (ly).

Alpha Corvi

Alpha Corvi (α Corvi, abbreviated Alpha Crv, α Crv), also named Alchiba , is an F-type main-sequence star and the fifth-brightest star in the constellation of Corvus. Based on parallax measurements made during the Hipparcos mission, it is approximately 49 light-years from the Sun.

Apparent magnitude

Apparent magnitude (m) is a measure of the relative brightness of a star or other astronomical objects as seen by an observer. An object's apparent magnitude depends on its intrinsic luminosity, its distance, and any extinction of the object's light by interstellar dust along the line of sight to the observer.

The magnitude scale is an inverse logarithmic relation, where a difference of 1.0 in magnitude corresponds to a brightness ratio of 5√100 or about 2.512. The brighter an object appears, the lower its magnitude. For example, a star of apparent magnitude 2.0 is 2.512 times brighter than a star of apparent magnitude 3.0. The brightest astronomical objects have negative apparent magnitudes: for example, Venus at −4.2 or Sirius at −1.46. The faintest naked-eye stars visible on the darkest night have apparent magnitudes of about +6.5. Apparent magnitudes range from −26.7 (the Sun) to fainter than +30 (such as the faintest objects detected in deep Hubble Space Telescope images).Measurement of the apparent magnitude of celestial objects is termed photometry. It is often quantified at ultraviolet, visible, and infrared wavelengths, as measured through standard passband filters corresponding to various adopted photometric systems such as the UBV system or the Strömgren uvbyβ system. In accepted astronomical notation, apparent magnitude may be denoted as mV, as in "mV = 15" to describe a 15th-magnitude object, where "V" coresponds to the visual filter band. In amateur astronomy, apparent magnitude is often understood as meaning apparent visual magnitude (v), defined as the brightness of a star or other astronomical source across the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum when viewed by the human eye.Absolute magnitude rather than apparent brightness is a measure of its true intrinsic luminosity, and is expressed on the same inverse logarithmic scale. Absolute magnitude is defined as the apparent magnitude that a star or object would have if it were observed from a standard reference distance of 10 parsecs.

Beta Hydri

Beta Hydri (β Hyi, β Hydri) is a star in the southern circumpolar constellation of Hydrus. (Note that Hydrus is not the same as Hydra.) With an apparent visual magnitude of 2.8, this is the brightest star in the constellation. Based upon parallax measurements the distance to this star is about 24.33 light-years (7.46 parsecs).This star has about 104% of the mass of the Sun and 181% of the Sun's radius, with more than three times the Sun's luminosity. The spectrum of this star matches a stellar classification of G2 IV, with the luminosity class of 'IV' indicating this is a subgiant star. As such, it is a slightly more evolved star than the Sun, with the supply of hydrogen at its core becoming exhausted. It is one of the oldest stars in the solar neighborhood. This star bears some resemblance to what the Sun may look like in the far distant future, making it an object of interest to astronomers.

Denebola

Denebola , designated Beta Leonis (β Leonis, abbreviated Beta Leo, β Leo) is the second-brightest star in the zodiac constellation of Leo, although the two components of the γ Leonis double star, which are unresolved to the naked eye, have a combined magnitude brighter than it. Denebola is an A-type main sequence star with 75% more mass than the Sun and 15 times the Sun's luminosity. Based on parallax measurements from the Hipparcos astrometry satellite, the star is at a distance of about 36 light-years (11 parsecs) from the Sun. Its apparent visual magnitude is 2.14, making it readily visible to the naked eye. Denebola is a suspected Delta Scuti type variable star, meaning its luminosity varies very slightly over a period of a few hours.

List of brightest stars

This is a list of stars down to magnitude +2.50, as determined by their maximum, total, or combined visual magnitudes as viewed from Earth. Although several of the brightest stars are known binary or multiple star systems and are relatively close to Earth, they appear to the naked eye as single stars. The list below combines/adds the magnitudes of bright individual components. Most of the proper names in this list are those approved by the Working Group on Star Names. Popular star names here that have not been approved by the IAU appear with a short note.

List of extremes in the sky

This article describes some extremes in the sky as a textual addition to the list of star extremes page.

List of nearest exoplanets

There are 4,071 known exoplanets, or planets outside our solar system that orbit a star, as of June 1, 2019; only a small fraction of these are located in the vicinity of the Solar System. Within 10 parsecs (32.6 light-years), there are 97 exoplanets listed as confirmed by the NASA Exoplanet Archive. Among the over 400 known stars within 10 parsecs, 54 have been confirmed to have planetary systems; 51 stars in this range are visible to the naked eye, nine of which have planetary systems.

The first report of an exoplanet within this range was in 1998 for a planet orbiting around Gliese 876 (15.3 light-years (ly) away), and the latest as of 2017 is one around Ross 128 (11 ly). The closest exoplanet found is Proxima Centauri b, which was confirmed in 2016 to orbit Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our Solar System (4.25 ly). HD 219134 (21.6 ly) has six exoplanets, the highest number discovered for any star within this range. A planet around Fomalhaut (25 ly) was, in 2008, the first planet to be directly imaged.Most known nearby exoplanets orbit close to their star and have highly eccentric orbits. A majority are significantly larger than Earth, but a few have similar masses, including two planets (around YZ Ceti, 12 ly) which may be less massive than Earth. Several confirmed exoplanets are hypothesized to be potentially habitable, with Proxima Centauri b and three around Gliese 667 C (23.6 ly) considered the most likely candidates. The International Astronomical Union took a public survey in 2015 about renaming some known extrasolar bodies, including the planets around Epsilon Eridani (10.5 ly) and Fomalhaut.

List of proper names of stars

These names of stars that have either been approved by the International Astronomical Union (its Working Group on Star Names has since 2016 been publishing a "List of IAU-approved Star Names", which as of June 2018 included a total of 330 proper names of stars) or which have been in somewhat recent usage. See also the lists of stars by constellation, which give variant names, derivations, and magnitudes.

Of the roughly 10,000 stars visible to the naked eye, only a few hundred have been given proper names in the history of astronomy. Traditional astronomy tends to group stars into asterisms, and give proper names to those, not to individual stars.

Many star names are in origin descriptive of the part of the asterism they are found in; thus Phecda, a corruption of the Arabic -فخذ الدب- fakhth al-dubb "thigh of the bear". Only a handful of the brightest stars have individual proper names not depending on their asterism; so Sirius "the scorcher", Antares "like Mars", Canopus (of uncertain origin), Alphard "the solitary one", Regulus "kinglet"; and arguably Aldebaran "the follower" (of the Pleiades), Procyon "preceding the dog [Sirius]". The same holds for Chinese star names, where most stars are enumerated within their asterisms, with a handful of exceptions such as 織女 "weaving girl" (Vega).

In addition to the limited number of traditional star names, there are some coined in modern times, e.g. "Avior" for Epsilon Carinae (1930), and a number of stars named after people (mostly in the 20th century).

List of star systems within 20–25 light-years

This is a list of star systems within 20–25 light years of Earth.

List of star systems within 25–30 light-years

This is a list of star systems within 25-30 light years of Earth.

List of stars more luminous than any closer star

This is a list of stars which are more luminous than any closer star, that is, stars which emit more radiation than any other star within the same distance of the Sun. The luminosities are measured in bolometric luminosity and not by visual luminosity. For example, Alpha Centauri A is the most luminous star within 5 light-years of the Sun. In order to find a star more luminous than α Cen, the radius would have to be extended out to 9 light years, to include Sirius. The closest star more luminous than Sirius is Vega, at 25 light years, and so on.

Lists of astronomical objects

This is a list of lists, grouped by type of astronomical object.

Lists of stars

The following are lists of stars. These are astronomical objects that spend some portion of their existence generating energy through thermonuclear fusion.

Milky Way

The Milky Way is the galaxy that contains the Solar System. The name describes the galaxy's appearance from Earth: a hazy band of light seen in the night sky formed from stars that cannot be individually distinguished by the naked eye. The term Milky Way is a translation of the Latin via lactea, from the Greek γαλαξίας κύκλος (galaxías kýklos, "milky circle"). From Earth, the Milky Way appears as a band because its disk-shaped structure is viewed from within. Galileo Galilei first resolved the band of light into individual stars with his telescope in 1610. Until the early 1920s, most astronomers thought that the Milky Way contained all the stars in the Universe. Following the 1920 Great Debate between the astronomers Harlow Shapley and Heber Curtis, observations by Edwin Hubble showed that the Milky Way is just one of many galaxies.

The Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy with a diameter between 150,000 and 200,000 light-years (ly). It is estimated to contain 100–400 billion stars and more than 100 billion planets. The Solar System is located at a radius of 26,490 (± 100) light-years from the Galactic Center, on the inner edge of the Orion Arm, one of the spiral-shaped concentrations of gas and dust. The stars in the innermost 10,000 light-years form a bulge and one or more bars that radiate from the bulge. The galactic center is an intense radio source known as Sagittarius A*, assumed to be a supermassive black hole of 4.100 (± 0.034) million solar masses.

Stars and gases at a wide range of distances from the Galactic Center orbit at approximately 220 kilometers per second. The constant rotation speed contradicts the laws of Keplerian dynamics and suggests that much (about 90%) of the mass of the Milky Way is invisible to telescopes, neither emitting nor absorbing electromagnetic radiation. This conjectural mass has been termed "dark matter". The rotational period is about 240 million years at the radius of the Sun. The Milky Way as a whole is moving at a velocity of approximately 600 km per second with respect to extragalactic frames of reference. The oldest stars in the Milky Way are nearly as old as the Universe itself and thus probably formed shortly after the Dark Ages of the Big Bang.The Milky Way has several satellite galaxies and is part of the Local Group of galaxies, which form part of the Virgo Supercluster, which is itself a component of the Laniakea Supercluster.

Nu Phoenicis

Nu Phoenicis is a F-type main-sequence star in the southern constellation of Phoenix. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.95. This is a solar analogue, meaning its observed properties appear similar to the Sun, although it is somewhat more massive. At an estimated distance of around 49.5 light years, this star is located relatively near the Sun.

Based on observations of excess infrared radiation from this star, it may possess a dust ring that extends outward several AU from an inner edge starting at 10 AU.

Outline of astronomy

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to astronomy:

Astronomy – studies the universe beyond Earth, including its formation and development, and the evolution, physics, chemistry, meteorology, and motion of celestial objects (such as galaxies, planets, etc.) and phenomena that originate outside the atmosphere of Earth (such as the cosmic background radiation).

Solar analog

Solar-type star, solar analogs (also analogues), and solar twins are stars that are particularly similar to the Sun. The stellar classification is a hierarchy with solar twin being most like the Sun followed by solar analog and then solar-type. Observations of these stars are important for understanding better the properties of the Sun in relation to other stars and the habitability of planets.

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