List of members of the Baseball Hall of Fame

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York honors individuals who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport, and is the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, displaying baseball-related artifacts and exhibits. Elections of worthy individuals to be honored by induction into the Hall of Fame commenced in 1936, although the first induction ceremonies were not held until the hall opened in 1939.[1] Through the elections for 2019, a total of 323 people have been inducted, including 230 former major league players, 32 executives, 35 Negro League players and executives, 22 managers, and 10 umpires. Each is listed showing his primary position; that is, the position or role in which the player made his greatest contribution to baseball according to the Hall of Fame.

According to the current rules, players must have at least 10 years of major league experience to be eligible for induction. In addition, they must be retired for at least five years if living, or deceased for at least six months. Players meeting these qualifications must pass through a screening committee, and are then voted on by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). Each writer may vote for up to 10 players; to be admitted into the Hall of Fame, a player must be approved by 75% of those casting ballots.[2] Players receiving less than 5% approval are removed from future BBWAA ballots.[1] The rules, as revised in July 2016, allow that all individuals eligible for induction but not for the BBWAA ballot—players who have not been approved by the BBWAA election process within 15 years of their retirement, umpires, managers, pioneers, and executives—may be considered by one of four voting bodies that have taken over the role of the former Veterans Committee, based on the era in which each individual candidate made his greatest contribution to the sport.[3] On a few occasions, exceptions have been made to the guidelines in place at the time: Lou Gehrig was elected in 1939 following his diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis;[1] Roberto Clemente was elected shortly after his death in 1972; and Addie Joss was elected in 1978 even though he completed only nine seasons before his death.[4]

Between 1971 and 1977, nine players from the Negro Leagues were inducted by a special Negro Leagues Committee, which was given the task of identifying worthy players who played in the Negro Leagues prior to the breaking of baseball's color line. Since 1977, players from the Negro Leagues have been considered by the Veterans Committee, and nine more individuals have been approved by that body.[5] In 2005, the Hall announced the formation of a Committee on African-American Baseball, which held a 2006 election for eligible figures from the Negro Leagues and earlier 19th-century teams;[6] 17 additional Negro League figures were chosen in that election, including executive Effa Manley, the first woman inducted.[7]

Baseball Hall of Fame Plaque Gallery
The plaque gallery

Key

Year Links to the article about that year's election
Position The first position listed is the position at which the individual is best known.
Italics Players who were elected in their first year of eligibility.
EXEC Baseball executives, such as a general manager
MGR Managers
PIO Pioneer contributors[8]
UMP Umpires
BBWAA Baseball Writers' Association of America
VC Veterans Committee
NLC Veterans Committee based on Negro league career
SCNL Special committee on the Negro Leagues and the Pre-Negro League
P Pitcher
C Catcher
1B First baseman
2B Second baseman
3B Third baseman
SS Shortstop
LF Left fielder
CF Center fielder
RF Right fielder
DH Designated hitter

Members

Cy young pitching
Cy Young, elected 1937
AGSpalding
Albert Spalding, elected 1939
MLB-Ed Delahanty
Ed Delahanty, elected 1945
Ed Walsh Baseball
Ed Walsh, elected 1946
Billklem
Bill Klem, elected 1953
Hank Greenberg 1937 cropped
Hank Greenberg, elected 1956
Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax, elected 1972

In the table below, "primary team" is based on the inductees' biographies at the Hall of Fame website. This does not necessarily match the cap logo on the inductee's Hall of Fame plaque (if applicable; those inducted as executives are shown without caps, and many early players are depicted without cap logos because logos were not in use during the individuals' careers).

Year Name Primary
position
Primary team Career Induction method Vote % Ref
1936 Ty Cobb CF Detroit Tigers 1905–1928 BBWAA 98.23% [9]
1936 Walter Johnson P Washington Senators 1907–1927 BBWAA 83.63% [10]
1936 Christy Mathewson P New York Giants 1900–1916 BBWAA 90.71% [11]
1936 Babe Ruth RF New York Yankees 1914–1935 BBWAA 95.13% [12]
1936 Honus Wagner SS Pittsburgh Pirates 1897–1917 BBWAA 95.13% [13]
1937 Morgan Bulkeley EXEC
1874–1876 VC
1
[14]
1937 Ban Johnson EXEC
1900–1927 VC
1
[15]
1937 Nap Lajoie 2B Cleveland Indians 1896–1916 BBWAA 83.58% [16]
1937 Connie Mack MGR Philadelphia Athletics 1894–1950 VC
1
[17]
1937 John McGraw MGR New York Giants 1899
1901–1932
VC
1
[18]
1937 Tris Speaker CF Cleveland Indians 1907–1928 BBWAA 82.09% [19]
1937 George Wright EXEC/PIO Boston Red Stockings 1867–1882 VC
1
[20]
1937 Cy Young P Cleveland Spiders[c 1] 1890–1911 BBWAA 76.12% [21]
1938 Grover Cleveland Alexander P Philadelphia Phillies 1911–1929 BBWAA 80.92% [22]
1938 Alexander Cartwright PIO Knickerbocker Base Ball Club
VC
1
[23]
1938 Henry Chadwick PIO
VC
1
[24]
1939 Cap Anson 1B Chicago White Stockings 1871–1897 VC
1
[25]
1939 Eddie Collins 2B Chicago White Sox 1906–1930 BBWAA 77.74% [26]
1939 Charles Comiskey EXEC/PIO Chicago White Sox 1900–1931 VC
1
[27]
1939 Candy Cummings EXEC/PIO Hartford Dark Blues 1872–1877 VC
1
[28]
1939 Buck Ewing C New York Giants 1880–1897 VC
1
[29]
1939 Lou Gehrig 1B New York Yankees 1923–1939 BBWAA
4
[30]
1939 Willie Keeler RF New York Highlanders[c 2] 1892–1910 BBWAA 75.55% [31]
1939 Charles Radbourn P Providence Grays 1881–1891 VC
1
[32]
1939 George Sisler 1B St. Louis Browns 1915–1922
1924–1930
BBWAA 85.77% [33]
1939 Al Spalding EXEC/PIO Chicago White Stockings 1871–1878 VC
1
[34]
1942 Rogers Hornsby 2B St. Louis Cardinals 1915–1937 BBWAA 78.11% [35]
1944 Kenesaw Landis EXEC
1920–1944 VC
1
[36]
1945 Roger Bresnahan C New York Giants 1897
1900–1915
VC
1
[37]
1945 Dan Brouthers 1B Buffalo Bisons 1879–1896
1904
VC
1
[38]
1945 Fred Clarke LF Pittsburgh Pirates 1894–1915 VC
1
[39]
1945 Jimmy Collins 3B Boston Red Sox 1895–1908 VC
1
[40]
1945 Ed Delahanty LF Philadelphia Phillies 1888–1903 VC
1
[41]
1945 Hugh Duffy CF Boston Beaneaters 1888–1906 VC
1
[42]
1945 Hugh Jennings SS Baltimore Orioles (NL)[c 3] 1891–1918 VC
1
[43]
1945 King Kelly RF Chicago White Stockings 1878–1893 VC
1
[44]
1945 Jim O'Rourke LF New York Giants 1872–1893
1904
VC
1
[45]
1945 Wilbert Robinson MGR Brooklyn Dodgers 1902
1914–1931
VC
1
[46]
1946 Jesse Burkett LF Cleveland Spiders 1890–1905 VC
1
[47]
1946 Frank Chance 1B Chicago Cubs 1898–1914 VC
1
[48]
1946 Jack Chesbro P New York Highlanders 1899–1909 VC
1
[49]
1946 Johnny Evers 2B Chicago Cubs 1902–1917
1922
1929
VC
1
[50]
1946 Clark Griffith EXEC/PIO Washington Senators 1891–1914 VC
1
[51]
1946 Tommy McCarthy RF Boston Beaneaters 1884–1896 VC
1
[52]
1946 Joe McGinnity P New York Giants 1899–1908 VC
1
[53]
1946 Eddie Plank P Philadelphia Athletics 1901–1917 VC
1
[54]
1946 Joe Tinker SS Chicago Cubs 1902–1916 VC
1
[55]
1946 Rube Waddell P Philadelphia Athletics 1897
1899–1910
VC
1
[56]
1946 Ed Walsh P Chicago White Sox 1904–1917 VC
1
[57]
1947 Mickey Cochrane C Philadelphia Athletics[c 4] 1925–1937 BBWAA 79.5% [58]
1947 Frankie Frisch 2B St. Louis Cardinals 1919–1937 BBWAA 84.47% [59]
1947 Lefty Grove P Philadelphia Athletics[c 5] 1925–1941 BBWAA 76.4% [60]
1947 Carl Hubbell P New York Giants 1928–1943 BBWAA 86.96% [61]
1948 Herb Pennock P New York Yankees[c 6] 1912–1934 BBWAA 77.69% [62]
1948 Pie Traynor 3B Pittsburgh Pirates 1920–1935
1937
BBWAA 76.86% [63]
1949 Mordecai Brown P Chicago Cubs 1903–1916 VC
1
[64]
1949 Charlie Gehringer 2B Detroit Tigers 1924–1942 BBWAA 85.03% [65]
1949 Kid Nichols P Boston Beaneaters[c 7] 1890–1901
1904–1906
VC
1
[66]
1951 Jimmie Foxx 1B Philadelphia Athletics[c 8] 1925–1942
1944–1945
BBWAA 79.2% [67]
1951 Mel Ott RF New York Giants 1926–1947 BBWAA 87.17% [68]
1952 Harry Heilmann RF Detroit Tigers 1914
1916–1931
BBWAA 86.75% [69]
1952 Paul Waner RF Pittsburgh Pirates 1926–1945 BBWAA 83.33% [70]
1953 Ed Barrow EXEC New York Yankees 1921–1945 VC
1
[71]
1953 Chief Bender P Philadelphia Athletics 1903–1917
1925
VC
1
[72]
1953 Tom Connolly UMP
1898–1931 VC
1
[73]
1953 Dizzy Dean P St. Louis Cardinals 1930
1932–1941
1947
BBWAA 79.17% [74]
1953 Bill Klem UMP
1905–1941 VC
1
[75]
1953 Al Simmons LF Philadelphia Athletics 1924–1941
1943–1944
BBWAA 75.38% [76]
1953 Bobby Wallace SS St. Louis Browns 1894–1918 VC
1
[77]
1953 Harry Wright MGR Philadelphia Quakers 1871–1893 VC
1
[78]
1954 Bill Dickey C New York Yankees 1928–1943
1946
BBWAA 80.16% [79]
1954 Rabbit Maranville SS Boston Braves 1912–1933
1935
BBWAA 82.94% [80]
1954 Bill Terry 1B New York Giants 1923–1936 BBWAA 77.38% [81]
1955 Frank Baker 3B Philadelphia Athletics 1908–1914
1916–1919
1921–1922
VC
1
[82]
1955 Joe DiMaggio CF New York Yankees 1936–1942
1946–1951
BBWAA 88.84% [83]
1955 Gabby Hartnett C Chicago Cubs 1922–1941 BBWAA 77.69% [84]
1955 Ted Lyons P Chicago White Sox 1923–1942
1946
BBWAA 86.45% [85]
1955 Ray Schalk C Chicago White Sox 1912–1929 VC
1
[86]
1955 Dazzy Vance P Brooklyn Dodgers 1915
1918
1922–1935
BBWAA 81.67% [87]
1956 Joe Cronin SS Boston Red Sox 1926–1945 BBWAA 78.76% [88]
1956 Hank Greenberg 1B Detroit Tigers 1930
1933–1941
1945–1947
BBWAA 84.97% [89]
1957 Sam Crawford RF Detroit Tigers 1899–1917 VC
1
[90]
1957 Joe McCarthy MGR New York Yankees 1926–1946
1948–1950
VC
1
[91]
1959 Zack Wheat LF Brooklyn Dodgers 1909–1927 VC
1
[92]
1961 Max Carey CF Pittsburgh Pirates 1910–1929 VC
1
[93]
1961 Billy Hamilton CF Philadelphia Phillies[c 9] 1888–1901 VC
1
[94]
1962 Bob Feller P Cleveland Indians 1936–1941
1945–1956
BBWAA 93.75% [95]
1962 Bill McKechnie MGR Cincinnati Reds 1915
1922–1926
1928–1946
VC
1
[96]
1962 Jackie Robinson 2B Brooklyn Dodgers 1947–1956 BBWAA 77.5% [97]
1962 Edd Roush CF Cincinnati Reds 1913–1929
1931
VC
1
[98]
1963 John Clarkson P Boston Beaneaters 1882
1884–1894
VC
1
[99]
1963 Elmer Flick RF Cleveland Indians 1898–1910 VC
1
[100]
1963 Sam Rice RF Washington Senators 1915–1934 VC
1
[101]
1963 Eppa Rixey P Cincinnati Reds 1912–1917
1919–1933
VC
1
[102]
1964 Luke Appling SS Chicago White Sox 1930–1943
1945–1950
BBWAA 94% [103]
1964 Red Faber P Chicago White Sox 1914–1933 VC
1
[104]
1964 Burleigh Grimes P Brooklyn Dodgers 1916–1934 VC
1
[105]
1964 Miller Huggins MGR New York Yankees 1913–1929 VC
1
[106]
1964 Tim Keefe P New York Giants 1880–1893 VC
1
[107]
1964 Heinie Manush LF Washington Senators[c 10] 1923–1939 VC
1
[108]
1964 John Ward SS New York Giants 1878–1894 VC
1
[109]
1965 Pud Galvin P Buffalo Bisons 1875
1879–1892
VC
1
[110]
1966 Casey Stengel MGR New York Yankees 1934–1936
1938–1943
1946–1960
1962–1965
VC
1
[111]
1966 Ted Williams LF Boston Red Sox 1939–1942
1946–1960
BBWAA 93.38% [112]
1967 Branch Rickey EXEC
1925–1955 VC
1
[113]
1967 Red Ruffing P New York Yankees 1924–1942
1945–1947
BBWAA 86.93% [114]
1967 Lloyd Waner CF Pittsburgh Pirates 1927–1942
1944–1945
VC
1
[115]
1968 Kiki Cuyler RF Chicago Cubs 1921–1938 VC
1
[116]
1968 Goose Goslin LF Washington Senators 1921–1938 VC
1
[117]
1968 Joe Medwick LF St. Louis Cardinals 1932–1948 BBWAA 84.81% [118]
1969 Roy Campanella C Brooklyn Dodgers 1948–1957 BBWAA 79.41% [119]
1969 Stan Coveleski P Cleveland Indians 1912
1916–1928
VC
1
[120]
1969 Waite Hoyt P New York Yankees 1918–1938 VC
1
[121]
1969 Stan Musial LF St. Louis Cardinals 1941–1944
1946–1963
BBWAA 93.24% [122]
1970 Lou Boudreau SS Cleveland Indians 1938–1952 BBWAA 77.33% [123]
1970 Earle Combs CF New York Yankees 1924–1935 VC
1
[124]
1970 Ford Frick EXEC
1934–1951
1951–19653
VC
1
[125]
1970 Jesse Haines P St. Louis Cardinals 1918
1920–1937
VC
1
[126]
1971 Dave Bancroft SS Philadelphia Phillies 1915–1930 VC
1
[127]
1971 Jake Beckley 1B Pittsburgh Pirates 1888–1907 VC
1
[128]
1971 Chick Hafey LF St. Louis Cardinals 1924–1935
1937
VC
1
[129]
1971 Harry Hooper RF Boston Red Sox 1909–1925 VC
1
[130]
1971 Joe Kelley LF Baltimore Orioles (NL) 1891–1906
1908
VC
1
[131]
1971 Rube Marquard P New York Giants 1908–1925 VC
1
[132]
1971 Satchel Paige P Kansas City Monarchs 1927–1953
1955
1965
NLC
1
[133]
1971 George Weiss EXEC New York Yankees 1947–1966 VC
1
[134]
1972 Yogi Berra C New York Yankees 1946–1963
1965
BBWAA 85.61% [135]
1972 Josh Gibson C Homestead Grays 1930–1946 NLC 100% [136][137]
1972 Lefty Gomez P New York Yankees 1930–1943 VC
1
[138]
1972 Will Harridge EXEC
1909–1925 VC
1
[139]
1972 Sandy Koufax P Los Angeles Dodgers 1955–1966 BBWAA 86.87% [140]
1972 Buck Leonard 1B Homestead Grays 1933–1950 NLC 77.78% [137][141]
1972 Early Wynn P Cleveland Indians 1939
1941-1944
1946–1962
BBWAA 76.01% [142]
1972 Ross Youngs RF New York Giants 1917–1926 VC
1
[143]
1973 Roberto Clemente RF Pittsburgh Pirates 1955–1972 BBWAA 92.69% [144]
1973 Billy Evans UMP
1906–1927 VC
1
[145]
1973 Monte Irvin LF Newark Eagles 1937–1942
1945–1956
NLC 75% [146][147]
1973 George Kelly 1B New York Giants 1915–1917
1919–1930
1932
VC
1
[148]
1973 Warren Spahn P Milwaukee Braves 1942
1946–1965
BBWAA 82.89% [149]
1973 Mickey Welch P New York Giants 1880–1892 VC
1
[150]
1974 Cool Papa Bell CF St. Louis Stars 1922–1938
1942
1947–1950
NLC 100% [151][152]
1974 Jim Bottomley 1B St. Louis Cardinals 1922–1937 VC
1
[153]
1974 Jocko Conlan UMP
1941–1965 VC
1
[154]
1974 Whitey Ford P New York Yankees 1950
1953–1967
BBWAA 77.81% [155]
1974 Mickey Mantle CF New York Yankees 1951–1968 BBWAA 88.22% [156]
1974 Sam Thompson RF Philadelphia Phillies 1885–1898
1908
VC
1
[157]
1975 Earl Averill CF Cleveland Indians 1930–1941 VC
1
[158]
1975 Bucky Harris MGR Washington Senators 1924–1943
1947–1948
1950–1956
VC
1
[159]
1975 Billy Herman 2B Chicago Cubs 1931–1943
1946–1947
VC
1
[160]
1975 Judy Johnson 3B Hilldale Daisies 1918–1937 NLC
1
[161]
1975 Ralph Kiner LF Pittsburgh Pirates 1946–1955 BBWAA 75.41% [162]
1976 Oscar Charleston CF Pittsburgh Crawfords 1915–1950
1954
NLC
1
[163]
1976 Roger Connor 1B New York Giants 1880–1897 VC
1
[164]
1976 Cal Hubbard UMP
1936–1951 VC
1
[165]
1976 Bob Lemon P Cleveland Indians 1941–1942, 1946–1958 BBWAA 78.61% [166]
1976 Freddie Lindstrom 3B New York Giants 1924–1935 VC
1
[167]
1976 Robin Roberts P Philadelphia Phillies 1948–1966 BBWAA 86.86% [168]
1977 Ernie Banks SS Chicago Cubs 1953–1971 BBWAA 83.81% [169]
1977 Martín Dihigo P Cuban Stars (East) 1923–1931
1935–1936
1945
NLC 87.5% [170][171]
1977 Pop Lloyd SS New York Lincoln Giants 1906–1932 NLC 87.5% [171][172]
1977 Al López MGR Chicago White Sox[c 11] 1951–1965
1968–1969
VC
1
[173]
1977 Amos Rusie P New York Giants 1889–1895
1897–1898
1901
VC
1
[174]
1977 Joe Sewell SS Cleveland Indians 1920–1933 VC
1
[175]
1978 Addie Joss P Cleveland Indians 1902–1910 VC
1
[176]
1978 Larry MacPhail EXEC
1933–1942
1945–1947
VC
1
[177]
1978 Eddie Mathews 3B Milwaukee Braves 1952–1968 BBWAA 79.42% [178]
1979 Warren Giles EXEC Cincinnati Reds 1937–1951
1951–1969
VC
1
[179]
1979 Willie Mays CF San Francisco Giants 1951–1952
1954–1973
BBWAA 94.68% [180]
1979 Hack Wilson CF Chicago Cubs 1923–1934 VC
1
[181]
1980 Al Kaline RF Detroit Tigers 1953–1974 BBWAA 88.31% [182]
1980 Chuck Klein RF Philadelphia Phillies 1928–1944 VC
1
[183]
1980 Duke Snider CF Brooklyn Dodgers 1947–1964 BBWAA 86.49% [184]
1980 Tom Yawkey EXEC Boston Red Sox 1933–1976 VC
1
[185]
1981 Rube Foster MGR Chicago American Giants 1902–1926 VC
1
[186]
1981 Bob Gibson P St. Louis Cardinals 1959–1975 BBWAA 84.04% [187]
1981 Johnny Mize 1B St. Louis Cardinals 1936–1942
1946–1953
VC
1
[188]
1982 Hank Aaron RF Milwaukee Braves[c 12] 1954–1976 BBWAA 97.83% [189]
1982 Happy Chandler EXEC
1945–1951 VC
1
[190]
1982 Travis Jackson SS New York Giants 1922–1936 VC
1
[191]
1982 Frank Robinson RF Cincinnati Reds[c 13] 1956–1976 BBWAA 89.16% [192]
1983 Walter Alston MGR Los Angeles Dodgers 1954–1976 VC
1
[193]
1983 George Kell 3B Detroit Tigers 1943–1957 VC
1
[194]
1983 Juan Marichal P San Francisco Giants 1960–1975 BBWAA 83.69% [195]
1983 Brooks Robinson 3B Baltimore Orioles 1955–1977 BBWAA 91.98% [196]
1984 Luis Aparicio SS Chicago White Sox 1956–1973 BBWAA 84.62% [197]
1984 Don Drysdale P Los Angeles Dodgers 1956–1969 BBWAA 78.41% [198]
1984 Rick Ferrell C Boston Red Sox 1929–1945
1947
VC
1
[199]
1984 Harmon Killebrew 1B Minnesota Twins 1954–1975 BBWAA 83.13% [200]
1984 Pee Wee Reese SS Brooklyn Dodgers 1940–1942
1946–1958
VC
1
[201]
1985 Lou Brock LF St. Louis Cardinals 1961–1979 BBWAA 79.75% [202]
1985 Enos Slaughter RF St. Louis Cardinals 1938–1959 VC
1
[203]
1985 Arky Vaughan SS Pittsburgh Pirates 1932–1943
1947–1948
VC
1
[204]
1985 Hoyt Wilhelm P Chicago White Sox[c 14] 1952–1972 BBWAA 83.8% [205]
1986 Bobby Doerr 2B Boston Red Sox 1937–1944
1946–1951
VC
1
[206]
1986 Ernie Lombardi C Cincinnati Reds 1931–1947 VC
1
[207]
1986 Willie McCovey 1B San Francisco Giants 1959–1980 BBWAA 81.41% [208]
1987 Ray Dandridge 3B Newark Eagles 1933–1939
1942
1944
1949
VC
1
[209]
1987 Catfish Hunter P Oakland Athletics[c 15] 1965–1979 BBWAA 76.27% [210]
1987 Billy Williams LF Chicago Cubs 1959–1976 BBWAA 85.71% [211]
1988 Willie Stargell LF Pittsburgh Pirates 1962–1982 BBWAA 82.44% [212]
1989 Al Barlick UMP
1940–1943
1946–1955
1958–1971
VC
1
[213]
1989 Johnny Bench C Cincinnati Reds 1967–1983 BBWAA 96.42% [214]
1989 Red Schoendienst 2B St. Louis Cardinals 1945–1963 VC
1
[215]
1989 Carl Yastrzemski LF Boston Red Sox 1961–1983 BBWAA 94.63% [216]
1990 Joe Morgan 2B Cincinnati Reds 1963–1984 BBWAA 81.76% [217]
1990 Jim Palmer P Baltimore Orioles 1965–1984 BBWAA 92.57% [218]
1991 Rod Carew 1B Minnesota Twins 1967–1985 BBWAA 90.52% [219]
1991 Ferguson Jenkins P Chicago Cubs 1965–1983 BBWAA 75.4% [220]
1991 Tony Lazzeri 2B New York Yankees 1926–1939 VC
1
[221]
1991 Gaylord Perry P San Francisco Giants 1962–1983 BBWAA 77.2% [222]
1991 Bill Veeck EXEC Chicago White Sox 1946–1949
1951–1953
1959–1961
1975–1980
VC
1
[223]
1992 Rollie Fingers P Oakland Athletics 1968–1982
1984–1985
BBWAA 81.16% [224]
1992 Bill McGowan UMP
1925–1954 VC
1
[225]
1992 Hal Newhouser P Detroit Tigers 1939–1955 VC
1
[226]
1992 Tom Seaver P New York Mets 1967–1986 BBWAA 98.84% [227]
1993 Reggie Jackson RF Oakland Athletics[c 16] 1967–1987 BBWAA 93.62% [228]
1994 Steve Carlton P Philadelphia Phillies 1965–1988 BBWAA 95.82% [229]
1994 Leo Durocher MGR Brooklyn Dodgers 1939–1946
1948–1955
1966–1973
VC
1
[230]
1994 Phil Rizzuto SS New York Yankees 1941–1942
1946–1956
VC
1
[231]
1995 Richie Ashburn CF Philadelphia Phillies 1948–1962 VC
1
[232]
1995 Leon Day P Newark Eagles 1934–1939
1941–1943
1946
1949–1950
VC
1
[233]
1995 William Hulbert EXEC
1876–1882 VC
1
[234]
1995 Mike Schmidt 3B Philadelphia Phillies 1972–1989 BBWAA 96.52% [235]
1995 Vic Willis P Boston Braves 1898–1910 VC
1
[236]
1996 Jim Bunning P Detroit Tigers[c 17] 1955–1971 VC
1
[237]
1996 Bill Foster P Chicago American Giants 1923–1938 VC
1
[238]
1996 Ned Hanlon MGR Baltimore Orioles (NL) 1889–1890
1892–1907
VC
1
[239]
1996 Earl Weaver MGR Baltimore Orioles 1968–1982
1985–1986
VC
1
[240]
1997 Nellie Fox 2B Chicago White Sox 1947–1965 VC
1
[241]
1997 Tommy Lasorda MGR Los Angeles Dodgers 1976–1996 VC
1
[242]
1997 Phil Niekro P Atlanta Braves 1964–1987 BBWAA 80.34% [243]
1997 Willie Wells SS St. Louis Stars 1923
1924–1936
1942
1944–1948
VC
1
[244]
1998 George Davis SS New York Giants 1890–1909 VC
1
[245]
1998 Larry Doby CF Cleveland Indians 1942–1943
1946–1959
VC
1
[246]
1998 Lee MacPhail EXEC
1958–1984 VC
1
[247]
1998 Bullet Rogan P Kansas City Monarchs 1917
1920–1938
VC
1
[248]
1998 Don Sutton P Los Angeles Dodgers 1966–1988 BBWAA 81.6% [249]
1999 George Brett 3B Kansas City Royals 1973–1993 BBWAA 98.19% [250]
1999 Orlando Cepeda 1B San Francisco Giants 1958–1974 VC
1
[251]
1999 Nestor Chylak UMP
1954–1978 VC
1
[252]
1999 Nolan Ryan P California Angels[c 18] 1966
1968–1993
BBWAA 98.79% [253]
1999 Frank Selee MGR Boston Beaneaters 1890
1892–1905
VC
1
[254]
1999 Joe Williams P New York Lincoln Giants 1910–1932 VC
1
[255]
1999 Robin Yount SS Milwaukee Brewers 1974–1993 BBWAA 77.46% [256]
2000 Sparky Anderson MGR Detroit Tigers[c 19] 1970–1995 VC
1
[257]
2000 Carlton Fisk C Chicago White Sox[c 20] 1969
1971–1993
BBWAA 79.56% [258]
2000 Bid McPhee 2B Cincinnati Red Stockings 1882–1899 VC
1
[259]
2000 Tony Pérez 1B Cincinnati Reds 1964–1986 BBWAA 77.15% [260]
2000 Turkey Stearnes CF Detroit Stars 1920–1942
1945
VC
1
[261]
2001 Bill Mazeroski 2B Pittsburgh Pirates 1956–1972 VC
1
[262]
2001 Kirby Puckett CF Minnesota Twins 1984–1995 BBWAA 82.14% [263]
2001 Dave Winfield RF New York Yankees[c 21] 1973–1995 BBWAA 84.47% [264]
2001 Hilton Smith P Kansas City Monarchs 1932–1948 VC
1
[265]
2002 Ozzie Smith SS St. Louis Cardinals 1978–1996 BBWAA 91.74% [266]
2003 Gary Carter C Montreal Expos 1974-1992 BBWAA 78.02% [267]
2003 Eddie Murray 1B Baltimore Orioles 1977–1997 BBWAA 85.28% [268]
2004 Dennis Eckersley P Oakland Athletics 1975–1998 BBWAA 83.2% [269]
2004 Paul Molitor 3B Milwaukee Brewers 1978–1998 BBWAA 85.2% [270]
2005 Wade Boggs 3B Boston Red Sox 1982–1999 BBWAA 91.86% [271]
2005 Ryne Sandberg 2B Chicago Cubs 1981–1994
1996–1997
BBWAA 76.16% [272]
2006 Ray Brown P Homestead Grays 1931–1945 SCNL
2
[273]
2006 Willard Brown CF Kansas City Monarchs 1935–1950 SCNL
2
[274]
2006 Andy Cooper P Kansas City Monarchs 1920–1941 SCNL
2
[275]
2006 Frank Grant 2B Cuban Giants 1886–1903 SCNL
2
[276]
2006 Pete Hill CF Chicago American Giants 1899–1926 SCNL
2
[277]
2006 Biz Mackey C Hilldale Giants 1920–1947 SCNL
2
[278]
2006 Effa Manley EXEC Newark Eagles 1935–1948 SCNL
2
[279]
2006 José Méndez P Cuban Stars 1908–1926 SCNL
2
[280]
2006 Alex Pompez EXEC New York Cubans 1916–1950 SCNL
2
[281]
2006 Cum Posey EXEC Homestead Grays 1920–1946 SCNL
2
[282]
2006 Louis Santop C Hilldale Daisies 1909–1926 SCNL
2
[283]
2006 Bruce Sutter P Chicago Cubs[c 22] 1976–1988 BBWAA 76.9% [284]
2006 Mule Suttles 1B Newark Eagles 1921
1923–1944
SCNL
2
[285]
2006 Ben Taylor 1B Indianapolis ABCs 1908–1929 SCNL
2
[286]
2006 Cristóbal Torriente CF Chicago American Giants 1913–1928 SCNL
2
[287]
2006 Sol White EXEC Philadelphia Giants
SCNL
2
[288]
2006 J. L. Wilkinson EXEC Kansas City Monarchs 1912–1948 SCNL
2
[289]
2006 Jud Wilson 3B Philadelphia Stars 1922–1945 SCNL
2
[290]
2007 Tony Gwynn RF San Diego Padres 1982–2001 BBWAA 97.61% [291]
2007 Cal Ripken Jr. SS Baltimore Orioles 1981–2001 BBWAA 98.53% [292]
2008 Barney Dreyfuss EXEC/PIO Pittsburgh Pirates 1899–1932 VC 83.33% [293]
2008 Rich Gossage P New York Yankees 1972–1989
1991–1994
BBWAA 85.82% [294]
2008 Bowie Kuhn EXEC
1969–1984 VC 83.33% [295]
2008 Walter O'Malley EXEC Los Angeles Dodgers 1950–1979 VC 75% [296]
2008 Billy Southworth MGR St. Louis Cardinals 1929
1940–1951
VC 81.25% [297]
2008 Dick Williams MGR Montreal Expos[c 23] 1967–1969
1971–1988
VC 81.25% [298]
2009 Joe Gordon 2B New York Yankees 1938–1950 VC 83.33% [299]
2009 Rickey Henderson LF Oakland Athletics 1979–2003 BBWAA 94.81% [300]
2009 Jim Rice LF Boston Red Sox 1974–1989 BBWAA 76.44% [301]
2010 Doug Harvey UMP
1962–1992 VC 93.75% [302]
2010 Whitey Herzog MGR St. Louis Cardinals 1973–1990 VC 87.5% [303]
2010 Andre Dawson RF Montreal Expos 1977–1996 BBWAA 77.9% [304]
2011 Roberto Alomar 2B Toronto Blue Jays 1988–2004 BBWAA 90% [305]
2011 Bert Blyleven P Minnesota Twins 1970–1992 BBWAA 79.7% [305]
2011 Pat Gillick EXEC Toronto Blue Jays 1978–2008 VC 81.3% [306]
2012 Barry Larkin SS Cincinnati Reds 1986–2004 BBWAA 86.4% [307]
2012 Ron Santo 3B Chicago Cubs 1960–1974 VC 93.75% [308]
2013 Hank O'Day UMP
1895–1927 VC 93.8% [309]
2013 Jacob Ruppert EXEC New York Yankees 1915–1938 VC 93.8% [310]
2013 Deacon White 3B Buffalo Bisons (NL) 1871–1890 VC 87.5% [311]
2014 Bobby Cox MGR Atlanta Braves 1978–2010 VC 100% [312]
2014 Tom Glavine P Atlanta Braves 1987–2008 BBWAA 91.94% [313]
2014 Tony La Russa MGR St. Louis Cardinals[c 15] 1979–2011 VC 100% [312]
2014 Greg Maddux P Atlanta Braves[c 15] 1986–2008 BBWAA 97.19% [313]
2014 Frank Thomas DH Chicago White Sox 1990–2008 BBWAA 83.71% [313]
2014 Joe Torre MGR New York Yankees 1977–2010 VC 100% [312]
2015 Craig Biggio 2B Houston Astros 1988–2007 BBWAA 82.7% [314]
2015 Randy Johnson P Seattle Mariners[c 24] 1988–2009 BBWAA 97.27% [314]
2015 Pedro Martinez P Boston Red Sox 1992–2009 BBWAA 91.07% [314]
2015 John Smoltz P Atlanta Braves 1988–2009 BBWAA 82.88% [314]
2016 Ken Griffey Jr. CF Seattle Mariners 1989–2010 BBWAA 99.32% [315]
2016 Mike Piazza C New York Mets 1992–2008 BBWAA 82.95% [315]
2017 Jeff Bagwell 1B Houston Astros 1991–2005 BBWAA 86.2% [316]
2017 Tim Raines LF Montreal Expos 1979–2002 BBWAA 86% [317]
2017 Iván Rodríguez C Texas Rangers 1991–2011 BBWAA 76% [318]
2017 John Schuerholz EXEC Atlanta Braves 1966–present VC 100% [319]
2017 Bud Selig EXEC
1992–2015 VC 93.8% [320]
2018 Vladimir Guerrero RF Anaheim Angels 1996–2011 BBWAA 92.9% [321]
2018 Trevor Hoffman P San Diego Padres 1993–2010 BBWAA 79.9% [322]
2018 Chipper Jones 3B Atlanta Braves 1993
1995–2012
BBWAA 97.2% [323]
2018 Jim Thome 1B Cleveland Indians 1991–2012 BBWAA 89.8% [324]
2018 Jack Morris P Detroit Tigers 1977–1994 VC 87.5% [325]
2018 Alan Trammell SS Detroit Tigers 1977–1996 VC 81.3% [326]
2019 Mariano Rivera P New York Yankees 1995–2013 BBWAA 100% [327]
2019 Roy Halladay P Toronto Blue Jays[c 15] 1998–2013 BBWAA 85.4% [328]
2019 Edgar Martínez DH Seattle Mariners 1987–2004 BBWAA 85.4% [329]
2019 Mike Mussina P Baltimore Orioles[c 15] 1991–2008 BBWAA 76.7% [330]
2019 Harold Baines DH Chicago White Sox 1980–2001 VC 75% [331]
2019 Lee Smith P Chicago Cubs 1980–1997 VC 100% [332]

Notes

  • ^ Prior to the 2001 re-organization of the Veterans Committee, the percentage of the vote generally was not released for players selected by the Committee.[333]
  • ^ Percentage of the vote was not released for players approved by the Committee on African American Baseball (2006).[7]
  • ^ Ford Frick's two tenures as an executive included his stints as the president of the National League (1934–1951) and Commissioner of Baseball (1951–1965).[334]
  • ^ Lou Gehrig was elected by acclamation at the December 1939 winter meetings of the BBWAA.
Cap logos
  1. ^ Plaque features a Cleveland Naps logo.
  2. ^ Plaque features a Brooklyn Superbas logo.
  3. ^ Plaque features a Detroit Tigers logo.
  4. ^ Plaque features a Detroit Tigers logo.
  5. ^ Plaque features a Boston Red Sox logo.
  6. ^ Plaque features a Boston Red Sox logo.
  7. ^ Plaque features a St. Louis Cardinals logo.
  8. ^ Plaque features a Boston Red Sox logo.
  9. ^ Plaque features a Boston Beaneaters logo.
  10. ^ Plaque features a Detroit Tigers logo.
  11. ^ Plaque features a Cleveland Indians logo.
  12. ^ Plaque features an Atlanta Braves logo.
  13. ^ Plaque features a Baltimore Orioles logo.
  14. ^ Plaque features a New York Giants logo.
  15. ^ a b c d e Plaque does not have a team logo.
  16. ^ Plaque features a New York Yankees logo.
  17. ^ Plaque features a Philadelphia Phillies logo.
  18. ^ Plaque features a Texas Rangers logo.
  19. ^ Plaque features a Cincinnati Reds logo.
  20. ^ Plaque features a Boston Red Sox logo.
  21. ^ Plaque features a San Diego Padres logo.
  22. ^ Plaque features a St. Louis Cardinals logo.
  23. ^ Plaque features an Oakland Athletics logo.
  24. ^ Plaque features an Arizona Diamondbacks logo.

See also

References

General
  • "Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 16, 2009.
  • "Members Of The Baseball Hall Of Fame And Their Year Of Induction". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved July 6, 2010.
Inline citations
  1. ^ a b c Mullen, Maureen (July 25, 2009). "Rice, Rickey to Become Part of Hall's Storied History". New England Sports Network. Retrieved September 20, 2009.
  2. ^ "BBWAA Election Rules". Rules for Election. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 7, 2010.
  3. ^ "Hall of Fame Makes Series of Announcements" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. July 23, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2016.
  4. ^ James, Bill (1995). Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame? Baseball, Cooperstown, and the Politics of Glory. New York City: Simon & Schuster. pp. 333–334. ISBN 0-684-80088-8.
  5. ^ Singer, Tom. "Teddy Ballgame makes difference for Negro Leaguers to enter Hall". Major League Baseball. Retrieved September 21, 2009.
  6. ^ "Hall to consider 39 Negro, pre-Negro leaguers". ESPN. Associated Press. Retrieved September 21, 2009.
  7. ^ a b "First woman among 17 elected to baseball Hall". ESPN. Associated Press. February 27, 2006. Retrieved October 6, 2009.
  8. ^ Vail, James F. (2001). The road to Cooperstown: a critical history of baseball's Hall of Fame. McFarland & Company. p. 90. ISBN 0-7864-1012-4. Retrieved October 15, 2009.
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  11. ^ "Hall of Famers: Christy Mathewson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  12. ^ "Hall of Famers: Babe Ruth". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  18. ^ "Hall of Famers: John McGraw". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  19. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tris Speaker". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  27. ^ "Hall of Famers: Charles Comiskey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  28. ^ "Hall of Famers: Candy Cummings". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  29. ^ "Hall of Famers: Buck Ewing". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  30. ^ "Hall of Famers: Lou Gehrig". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  31. ^ "Hall of Famers: Willie Keeler". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  32. ^ "Hall of Famers: Charles Radbourn". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  33. ^ "Hall of Famers: George Sisler". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  34. ^ "Hall of Famers: Al Spalding". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  35. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rogers Hornsby". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  36. ^ "Hall of Famers: Kenesaw Landis". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  37. ^ "Hall of Famers: Roger Bresnahan". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  38. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dan Brouthers". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  39. ^ "Hall of Famers: Fred Clarke". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  40. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jimmy Collins". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  41. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ed Delahanty". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  42. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hugh Duffy". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  43. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hugh Jennings". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  44. ^ "Hall of Famers: King Kelly". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  45. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jim O'Rourke". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  46. ^ "Hall of Famers: Wilbert Robinson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  47. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jesse Burkett". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  48. ^ "Hall of Famers: Frank Chance". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  49. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jack Chesbro". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  50. ^ "Hall of Famers: Johnny Evers". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  52. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tommy McCarthy". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  53. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe McGinnity". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  54. ^ "Hall of Famers: Eddie Plank". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  55. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe Tinker". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  56. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rube Waddell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  57. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ed Walsh". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  58. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mickey Cochrane". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  59. ^ "Hall of Famers: Frankie Frisch". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  60. ^ "Hall of Famers: Lefty Grove". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  61. ^ "Hall of Famers: Carl Hubbell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  62. ^ "Hall of Famers: Herb Pennock". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  63. ^ "Hall of Famers: Pie Traynor". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  64. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mordecai Brown". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  65. ^ "Hall of Famers: Charlie Gehringer". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  66. ^ "Hall of Famers: Kid Nichols". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  67. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jimmie Foxx". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  68. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mel Ott". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  69. ^ "Hall of Famers: Harry Heilmann". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  70. ^ "Hall of Famers: Paul Waner". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  71. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ed Barrow". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  72. ^ "Hall of Famers: Chief Bender". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  73. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tom Connolly". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  74. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dizzy Dean". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  75. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill Klem". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  76. ^ "Hall of Famers: Al Simmons". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  77. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bobby Wallace". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  78. ^ "Hall of Famers: Harry Wright". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  79. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill Dickey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  80. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rabbit Maranville". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  81. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill Terry". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  82. ^ "Hall of Famers: Frank Baker". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  83. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe DiMaggio". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  84. ^ "Hall of Famers: Gabby Hartnett". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  85. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ted Lyons". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  86. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ray Schalk". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  87. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dazzy Vance". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  88. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe Cronin". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  89. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hank Greenberg". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  90. ^ "Hall of Famers: Sam Crawford". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  91. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe McCarthy". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  92. ^ "Hall of Famers: Zack Wheat". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  93. ^ "Hall of Famers: Max Carey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  94. ^ "Hall of Famers: Billy Hamilton". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  95. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bob Feller". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  96. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill McKechnie". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  97. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jackie Robinson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  98. ^ "Hall of Famers: Edd Roush". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  99. ^ "Hall of Famers: John Clarkson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  100. ^ "Hall of Famers: Elmer Flick". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  101. ^ "Hall of Famers: Sam Rice". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  102. ^ "Hall of Famers: Eppa Rixey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  103. ^ "Hall of Famers: Luke Appling". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  104. ^ "Hall of Famers: Red Faber". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  105. ^ "Hall of Famers: Burleigh Grimes". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  106. ^ "Hall of Famers: Miller Huggins". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  107. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tim keefe". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  108. ^ "Hall of Famers: Heinie Manush". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  109. ^ "Hall of Famers: John Ward". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  110. ^ "Hall of Famers: Pud Galvin". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  111. ^ "Hall of Famers: Casey Stengel". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  112. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ted Williams". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  113. ^ "Hall of Famers: Branch Rickey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  114. ^ "Hall of Famers: Red Ruffing". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  115. ^ "Hall of Famers: Lloyd Waner". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  116. ^ "Hall of Famers: Kiki Cuyler". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  117. ^ "Hall of Famers: Goose Goslin". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  118. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe Medwick". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  119. ^ "Hall of Famers: Roy Campanella". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  120. ^ "Hall of Famers: Stan Coveleski". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  121. ^ "Hall of Famers: Waite Hoyt". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  122. ^ "Hall of Famers: Stan Musial". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  123. ^ "Hall of Famers: Lou Boudreau". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  124. ^ "Hall of Famers: Earle Combs". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  126. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jesse Haines". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  127. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dave Bancroft". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  128. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jake Beckley". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  129. ^ "Hall of Famers: Chick Hafey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  131. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe Kelley". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  132. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rube Marquard". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  133. ^ "Hall of Famers: Satchel Paige". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  134. ^ "Hall of Famers: George Weiss". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  135. ^ "Hall of Famers: Yogi Berra". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  139. ^ "Hall of Famers: Will Harridge". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  140. ^ "Hall of Famers: Sandy Koufax". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  141. ^ "Hall of Famers: Buck Leonard". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  142. ^ "Hall of Famers: Early Wynn". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  143. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ross Youngs". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  144. ^ "Hall of Famers: Roberto Clemente". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  145. ^ "Hall of Famers: Billy Evans". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  146. ^ "Hall of Famers: Monte Irvin". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  148. ^ "Hall of Famers: George Kelly". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  149. ^ "Hall of Famers: Warren Spahn". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  150. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mickey Welch". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  151. ^ "Hall of Famers: Cool Papa Bell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  153. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jim Bottomley". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  154. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jocko Conlan". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  155. ^ "Hall of Famers: Whitey Ford". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  156. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mickey Mantle". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  157. ^ "Hall of Famers: Sam Thompson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  158. ^ "Hall of Famers: Earl Averill". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  159. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bucky Harris". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  160. ^ "Hall of Famers: Billy Herman". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  161. ^ "Hall of Famers: Judy Johnson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  162. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ralph Kiner". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  163. ^ "Hall of Famers: Oscar Charleston". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  164. ^ "Hall of Famers: Roger Connor". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  165. ^ "Hall of Famers: Cal Hubbard". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  166. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bob Lemon". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  167. ^ "Hall of Famers: Freddie Lindstrom". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  168. ^ "Hall of Famers: Robin Roberts". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  169. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ernie Banks". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  170. ^ "Hall of Famers: Martin Dihigo". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  172. ^ "Hall of Famers: Pop Lloyd". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  173. ^ "Hall of Famers: Al López". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  174. ^ "Hall of Famers: Amos Rusie". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  175. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe Sewell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  176. ^ "Hall of Famers: Addie Joss". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  177. ^ "Hall of Famers: Larry MacPhail". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  178. ^ "Hall of Famers: Eddie Mathews". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  179. ^ "Hall of Famers: Warren Giles". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  180. ^ "Hall of Famers: Willie Mays". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  181. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hack Wilson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  182. ^ "Hall of Famers: Al Kaline". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  183. ^ "Hall of Famers: Chuck Klein". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  184. ^ "Hall of Famers: Duke Snider". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  185. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tom Yawkey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  186. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rube Foster". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  187. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bob Gibson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  188. ^ "Hall of Famers: Johnny Mize". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  189. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hank Aaron". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  190. ^ "Hall of Famers: Happy Chandler". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  191. ^ "Hall of Famers: Travis Jackson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  192. ^ "Hall of Famers: Frank Robinson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  193. ^ "Hall of Famers: Walter Alston". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  194. ^ "Hall of Famers: George Kell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  195. ^ "Hall of Famers: Juan Marichal". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  196. ^ "Hall of Famers: Brooks Robinson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  197. ^ "Hall of Famers: Luis Aparicio". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  198. ^ "Hall of Famers: Don Drysdale". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  199. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rick Ferrell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  200. ^ "Hall of Famers: Harmon Killebrew". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  201. ^ "Hall of Famers: Pee Wee Reese". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  202. ^ "Hall of Famers: Lou Brock". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  203. ^ "Hall of Famers: Enos Slaughter". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  204. ^ "Hall of Famers: Arky Vaughan". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  205. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hoyt Wilhelm". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  206. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bobby Doerr". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  207. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ernie Lombardi". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  209. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ray Dandridge". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  210. ^ "Hall of Famers: Catfish Hunter". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  212. ^ "Hall of Famers: Willie Stargell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  216. ^ "Hall of Famers: Carl Yastrzemski". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  219. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rod Carew". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  220. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ferguson Jenkins". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  221. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tony Lazzeri". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  222. ^ "Hall of Famers: Gaylord Perry". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  223. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill Veeck". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  224. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rollie Fingers". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  225. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill McGowan". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  226. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hal Newhouser". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  227. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tom Seaver". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  228. ^ "Hall of Famers: Reggie Jackson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  229. ^ "Hall of Famers: Steve Carlton". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  230. ^ "Hall of Famers: Leo Durocher". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  231. ^ "Hall of Famers: Phil Rizzuto". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  232. ^ "Hall of Famers: Richie Ashburn". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  233. ^ "Hall of Famers: Leon Day". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  234. ^ "Hall of Famers: William Hulbert". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  235. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mike Schmidt". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  236. ^ "Hall of Famers: Vic Willis". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  237. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jim Bunning". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  238. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill Foster". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  239. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ned Hanlon". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  240. ^ "Hall of Famers: Earl Weaver". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  241. ^ "Hall of Famers: Nellie Fox". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  242. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tommy Lasorda". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  243. ^ "Hall of Famers: Phil Niekro". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  245. ^ "Hall of Famers: George Davis". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  248. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bullet Rogan". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  249. ^ "Hall of Famers: Don Sutton". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  250. ^ "Hall of Famers: George Brett". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  251. ^ "Hall of Famers: Orlando Cepeda". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  252. ^ "Hall of Famers: Nestor Chylak". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  253. ^ "Hall of Famers: Nolan Ryan". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
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  256. ^ "Hall of Famers: Robin Yount". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  257. ^ "Hall of Famers: Sparky Anderson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  258. ^ "Hall of Famers: Carlton Fisk". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  259. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bid McPhee". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  260. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tony Pérez". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  261. ^ "Hall of Famers: Turkey Stearnes". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  262. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill Mazeroski". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  263. ^ "Hall of Famers: Kirby Puckett". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  264. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dave Winfield". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 10, 2013.
  265. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hilton Smith". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  266. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ozzie Smith". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  267. ^ "Hall of Famers: Gary Carter". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  268. ^ "Hall of Famers: Eddie Murray". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  269. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dennis Eckersley". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  270. ^ "Hall of Famers: Paul Molitor". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  271. ^ "Hall of Famers: Wade Boggs". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  272. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ryne Sandberg". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  273. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ray Brown". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  274. ^ "Hall of Famers: Willard Brown". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  275. ^ "Hall of Famers: Andy Cooper". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  276. ^ "Hall of Famers: Frank Grant". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  277. ^ "Hall of Famers: Pete Hill". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  278. ^ "Hall of Famers: Biz Mackey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  279. ^ "Hall of Famers: Effa Manley". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  280. ^ "Hall of Famers: José Méndez". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  281. ^ "Hall of Famers: Alex Pompez". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  282. ^ "Hall of Famers: Cum Posey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  283. ^ "Hall of Famers: Louis Santop". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  284. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bruce Sutter". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  285. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mule Suttles". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  286. ^ "Hall of Famers: Ben Taylor". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  287. ^ "Hall of Famers: Cristobal Torriente". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  288. ^ "Hall of Famers: Sol White". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  289. ^ "Hall of Famers: J. L. Wilkinson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  290. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jud Wilson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  291. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tony Gwynn". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  292. ^ "Hall of Famers: Cal Ripken, Jr". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  293. ^ "Hall of Famers: Barney Dreyfuss". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  294. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rich Gossage". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  295. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bowie Kuhn". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  296. ^ "Hall of Famers: Walter O'Malley". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  297. ^ "Hall of Famers: Billy Southworth". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  298. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dick Williams". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  299. ^ "Hall of Famers: Joe Gordon". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  300. ^ "Hall of Famers: Rickey Henderson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  301. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jim Rice". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  302. ^ "Hall of Famers: Doug Harvey". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  303. ^ "Hall of Famers: Whitey Herzog". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
  304. ^ "Hall of Famers: Andre Dawson". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved October 15, 2010.
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  306. ^ "Hall of Famers: Pat Gillick". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 5, 2011.
  307. ^ "Barry Larkin Elected to the Hall of Fame". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 9, 2012. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  308. ^ "Ron Santo Elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame by Golden Era Committee" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. December 5, 2011. Retrieved December 5, 2011.
  309. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hank O'Day". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved July 27, 2014.
  310. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jacob Ruppert". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved July 27, 2014.
  311. ^ "Hall of Famers: Deacon White". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved July 27, 2014.
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  313. ^ a b c "BBWAA Elects Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 8, 2014. Retrieved January 12, 2014.
  314. ^ a b c d "Hall of Fame Class of 2015" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 6, 2015. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  315. ^ a b "BBWAA Elects Ken Griffey Jr. and Mike Piazza" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 6, 2016. Retrieved January 7, 2016.
  316. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jeff Bagwell". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 18, 2017.
  317. ^ "Hall of Famers: Tim Raines". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 18, 2017.
  318. ^ "Hall of Famers: Iván Rodríguez". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 18, 2017.
  319. ^ "Hall of Famers: John Schuerholz". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  320. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bud Selig". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
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  322. ^ "Hall of Famers: Trevor Hoffman". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
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  329. ^ "Hall of Famers: Edgar Martinez". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  330. ^ "Hall of Famers: Mike Mussina". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  331. ^ "Hall of Famers: Harold Baines". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  332. ^ "Hall of Famers: Lee Smith". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
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  334. ^ Boxerman, Benita W. (2003). Ebbets to Veeck to Busch: eight owners who shaped baseball. McFarland. p. 27. ISBN 0-7864-1562-2.

External links

Al Kaline

Albert William Kaline (; born December 19, 1934), nicknamed "Mr. Tiger", is an American former Major League Baseball right fielder. He is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Kaline played his entire 22-year baseball career with the Detroit Tigers. For most of his career, Kaline played in the outfield, mainly as a right fielder where he won ten Gold Gloves and was known for his strong throwing arm. He was selected to 18 All-Star Games and was selected as an All-Star each year between 1955 and 1967.

Near the end of his career, Kaline also played as first baseman and, in his last season, was the Tigers' designated hitter. He retired not long after reaching the 3,000 hit milestone. Immediately after retiring from playing, he became the Tigers' TV color commentator, a position he held until 2002. Kaline still works for the Tigers as a front office official.

Alex Pompez

Alejandro "Alex" Pompez (May 3, 1890 – March 14, 1974) was an American executive in Negro league baseball who owned the Cuban Stars (East) and New York Cubans franchises from 1916 to 1950. His family had emigrated from Cuba, where his father was a lawyer. Outside baseball and numbers (illegal gambling), he owned and operated a cigar shop in downtown Manhattan. He later served as a scout and director of international scouting for the Giants franchise in Major League Baseball. He was posthumously inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.

Bill Veeck

William Louis Veeck Jr. (; February 9, 1914 – January 2, 1986), also known as "Sport Shirt", was an American Major League Baseball franchise owner and promoter. Veeck was at various times the owner of the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns and Chicago White Sox. As owner and team president of the Indians in 1947, Veeck signed Larry Doby, thus beginning the integration of the American League, and the following year won a World Series title as Cleveland's owner/president.

Veeck was the last owner to purchase a baseball franchise without an independent fortune, and is responsible for many innovations and contributions to baseball.Finding it hard to financially compete, Veeck retired after the 1980 Chicago White Sox season. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.

Burleigh Grimes

Burleigh Arland Grimes (August 18, 1893 – December 6, 1985) was an American professional baseball player, and the last pitcher officially permitted to throw the spitball. Grimes made the most of this advantage and he won 270 games and pitched in four World Series over the course of his 19-year career. He was elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1954, and to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964.

Duke Snider

Edwin Donald "Duke" Snider (September 19, 1926 – February 27, 2011), nicknamed "The Silver Fox" and "The Duke of Flatbush", was an American professional baseball player. Usually assigned to center field, he spent most of his Major League Baseball (MLB) career playing for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1947–1962), later playing one season each for the New York Mets (1963) and San Francisco Giants (1964).

Snider was named to the National League (NL) All-Star roster eight times and was the NL Most Valuable Player (MVP) runner-up in 1955. In his 16 out of 18 seasons with the Dodgers, he helped lead the Dodgers to six World Series, with victories in 1955 and 1959. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980.

Snider was also an avocado grower. He, along with a partner, had a 60 acre avocado farm south of Los Angeles.

Herb Pennock

Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 – January 30, 1948) was an American professional baseball pitcher and front-office executive. He played in Major League Baseball from 1912 through 1933, and is best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid to late 1920s and early 1930s.

Connie Mack signed Pennock to his Philadelphia Athletics in 1912. After using Pennock sparingly, and questioning his competitive drive, Mack sold Pennock to the Boston Red Sox in 1915. After returning from military service in 1919, Pennock became a regular contributor for the Red Sox. The Yankees acquired Pennock from the Red Sox after the 1922 season, and he served as a key member of the pitching staff as the Yankees won four World Series championships during his tenure with the team. After retiring as a player, Pennock served as a coach and farm system director for the Red Sox, and as general manager of the Philadelphia Phillies.

Pennock was regarded as one of the greatest left-handed pitchers in baseball history. Mack later called his sale of Pennock to the Red Sox his greatest mistake. Pennock died of a cerebral hemorrhage in 1948; later that year, he was posthumously inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Joe Tinker

Joseph Bert Tinker (July 27, 1880 – July 27, 1948) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played from 1902 through 1916 for the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball (MLB) and the Chicago Whales of the Federal League.

Born in Muscotah, Kansas, Tinker began playing semi-professional baseball in Kansas in the late 19th century. He began his professional career in 1900 in minor league baseball and made his MLB debut with the Cubs in 1902. Tinker was a member of the Chicago Cubs dynasty that won four pennants and two World Series championships between 1906 and 1910. After playing one season with Cincinnati in 1913, he became one of the first stars to jump to the upstart Federal League in 1914. After leading the Whales to the pennant in 1915, he returned to the Cubs as their player-manager in 1916, his final season in MLB.

Tinker returned to minor league baseball as a part-owner and manager for the Columbus Senators before moving to Orlando, Florida, to manage the Orlando Tigers. While in Orlando, Tinker developed a real estate firm, which thrived during the Florida land boom of the 1920s. However, the 1926 Miami hurricane and Great Depression cost Tinker most of his fortune, and he returned to professional baseball in the late 1930s.

With the Cubs, Tinker was a part of a great double-play combination with teammates Johnny Evers and Frank Chance that was immortalized as "Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance" in the poem "Baseball's Sad Lexicon". However, Evers and Tinker feuded off the field. Tinker was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946, the same year as Evers and Chance. He has also been honored by the Florida State League and the city of Orlando.

Johnny Bench

Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947) is an American former professional baseball catcher who played in the Major Leagues for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983 and is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Bench is a 14-time All-Star selection and a two-time National League Most Valuable Player. He was a key member of the Big Red Machine that won six division titles, four National League pennants, and two consecutive World Series championships. ESPN has called him the greatest catcher in baseball history.

Johnny Evers

John Joseph Evers (July 21, 1881 – March 28, 1947) was an American professional baseball second baseman and manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1902 through 1917 for the Chicago Cubs, Boston Braves, and Philadelphia Phillies. He also appeared in one game apiece for the Chicago White Sox and Braves while coaching them in 1922 and 1929, respectively.

Evers was born in Troy, New York. After playing for the local minor league baseball team for one season, Frank Selee, manager of the Cubs, purchased Evers's contract and soon made him his starting second baseman. Evers helped lead the Cubs to four National League pennants, including two World Series championships. The Cubs traded Evers to the Braves in 1914; that season, Evers led the Braves to victory in the World Series, and was named the league's Most Valuable Player. Evers continued to play for the Braves and Phillies through 1917. He then became a coach, scout, manager, and general manager in his later career.

Known as one of the smartest ballplayers in MLB, Evers also had a surly temper that he took out on umpires. Evers was a part of a great double-play combination with Joe Tinker and Frank Chance, which was immortalized as "Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance" in the poem "Baseball's Sad Lexicon". Evers was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1946.

Ken Griffey Jr.

George Kenneth Griffey Jr. (born November 21, 1969) nicknamed "Junior" and "The Kid", is an American former professional baseball outfielder who played 22 years in Major League Baseball (MLB). He spent most of his career with the Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds, along with a short stint with the Chicago White Sox. A member of the Baseball Hall of Fame and a 13-time All-Star, Griffey is one of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history; his 630 home runs rank as the seventh-most in MLB history. Griffey was also an exceptional defender and won 10 Gold Glove Awards in center field. He is tied for the record of most consecutive games with a home run (eight, with Don Mattingly and Dale Long).Although popular with fans around the league, Griffey was unable to shake reports of his petulant demeanor throughout his major league baseball career. Griffey signed lucrative deals with companies of international prominence like Nike and Nintendo; his popularity reflected well upon MLB and is credited by some with helping restore its image after the 1994 labor dispute. Griffey is one of only 29 players in baseball history to date to have appeared in major league games in four different calendar decades.

Following his playing career, Griffey joined the Mariners' front office as a special consultant. He was inducted into both the Mariners' Hall of Fame and the Reds Hall of Fame. In 2016, Griffey was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, receiving a 99.30% of the vote, breaking pitcher Tom Seaver's record of 98.84%. However, Griffey's record was broken three years later by Mariano Rivera, who became the first player to be inducted unanimously.Griffey is the son of former MLB player Ken Griffey Sr. and the father of National Football League player Trey Griffey.

List of Boston Red Sox Hall of Famers

This is a list of Boston Red Sox players who have been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Red Sox are a professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts, a member of the East division within the American League (AL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). From 1901 through 1907, the team was known as the Boston Americans. Since 1912, the Red Sox have played their home games at Fenway Park.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and the honoring of persons who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations". The expression "Hall of Fame" or the metonym "Cooperstown" are often used to refer to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Luis Aparicio

Luis Ernesto Aparicio Montiel (born April 29, 1934), nicknamed "Little Louie", is a former professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop from 1956 to 1973, most notably for the Chicago White Sox. He became known for his exceptional fielding and base stealing skills, and is the first Venezuelan player to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.Aparicio won the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year Award in 1956. He helped the "Go-Go" White Sox win the AL championship in 1959 and was the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) runner-up that season (he led the AL in stolen bases, putouts, assists, and fielding as shortstop). He was an AL All-Star for ten seasons, an AL stolen base leader for 9 consecutive seasons, and an AL Gold Glove winner for 9 seasons.MLB legend Ted Williams called Aparicio "the best shortstop he had ever seen". He was nominated for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team (one-hundred greatest players) in 1999.

Mike Piazza

Michael Joseph Piazza (; born September 4, 1968) is a former American professional baseball catcher who played 16 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), from 1992 to 2007. He played most notably for the New York Mets and Los Angeles Dodgers, while also having brief stints with the Florida Marlins, San Diego Padres, and Oakland Athletics. A 12-time All-Star and 10-time Silver Slugger Award winner at catcher, Piazza produced strong offensive numbers at his position; in his career, he recorded 427 home runs—a record 396 of which were hit as catcher—along with a .308 batting average and 1,335 runs batted in (RBIs).

Piazza was drafted by the Dodgers in the 1988 MLB draft as a favor from Tommy Lasorda to Piazza's father. Initially a first baseman, Piazza converted to catcher in the minor leagues at Lasorda's suggestion to improve his chances of being promoted. He made his major league debut in 1992 and the following year was named the National League (NL) Rookie of the Year and was an All-Star for the first of 10 consecutive seasons. Piazza immediately impressed with his ability to hit for power and average. His best year as a Dodger came in 1997 when he batted .362, hit 40 home runs, and had 124 RBIs, leading to a runner-up finish in voting for the NL Most Valuable Player Award. In 1998, he was traded to the Marlins and then a week later to the Mets, with whom he spent most of the remainder of his career. He helped the Mets reach the 2000 World Series, the only World Series appearance of his career. After the 2005 season, Piazza left the Mets to play one season each for the Padres and Athletics before retiring after the 2007 season.

Piazza is regarded as one of the best offensive catchers in baseball history. He had at least one RBI in 15 consecutive games for the Mets in 2000, the second-longest RBI streak ever. In 2013, the Mets inducted Piazza into the New York Mets Hall of Fame. In 2016, Piazza was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame as a Met, receiving 83% of the vote.Piazza is owner of the Italian soccer team A.C. Reggiana 1919, which played for two seasons (2017–2018) in Serie C under his leadership before its non-registration due to continued financial troubles.

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is an American history museum and hall of fame, located in Cooperstown, New York, and operated by private interests. It serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, displays baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and honors those who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations."

The word Cooperstown is often used as shorthand (or a metonym) for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, similarly to Canton for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

The Hall of Fame was established in 1939 by Stephen Carlton Clark, the owner of a local hotel. Clark had sought to bring tourists to a city hurt by the Great Depression, which reduced the local tourist trade, and Prohibition, which devastated the local hops industry. A new building was constructed, and the Hall of Fame was dedicated on June 12, 1939. (Clark's granddaughter, Jane Forbes Clark, is the current chairman of the Board of Directors.)

The erroneous claim that Civil War hero Abner Doubleday invented baseball in Cooperstown was instrumental in the early marketing of the Hall.

An expanded library and research facility opened in 1994. Dale Petroskey became the organization's president in 1999.In 2002, the Hall launched Baseball As America, a traveling exhibit that toured ten American museums over six years. The Hall of Fame has since also sponsored educational programming on the Internet to bring the Hall of Fame to schoolchildren who might not visit. The Hall and Museum completed a series of renovations in spring 2005. The Hall of Fame also presents an annual exhibit at FanFest at the Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

Jeff Idelson replaced Petroskey as president on April 16, 2008. He had been acting as president since March 25, 2008, when Petroskey was forced to resign for having "failed to exercise proper fiduciary responsibility" and making "judgments that were not in the best interest of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum."

Outline of baseball

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to baseball:

Baseball – bat-and-ball sport played between two teams of nine players each. The aim is to score runs by hitting a thrown ball with a bat and touching a series of four bases arranged at the corners of a ninety-foot diamond.

Stan Musial

Stanley Frank Musial (; born Stanisław Franciszek Musiał; November 21, 1920 – January 19, 2013), nicknamed Stan the Man, was an American baseball outfielder and first baseman. He spent 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, from 1941 to 1944 and 1946 to 1963. Widely considered to be one of the greatest and most consistent hitters in baseball history, Musial was a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969, and was also selected to the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014.

Musial batted .331 over the course of his career and set National League (NL) records for career hits (3,630), runs batted in (1,951), games played (3,026), at bats (10,972), runs scored (1,949) and doubles (725). His 475 career home runs then ranked second in NL history behind Mel Ott's total of 511. His 6,134 total bases remained a major league record until surpassed by Hank Aaron, and his hit total still ranks fourth all-time, and is the highest by any player who spent his career with only one team. A seven-time batting champion with identical totals of 1,815 hits at home and 1,815 hits on the road, he was named the National League's (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times and led St. Louis to three World Series championships. He also shares the major league record for the most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays. Musial was born in Donora, Pennsylvania, where he frequently played baseball informally or in organized settings, and eventually played on the baseball team at Donora High School.

Signed to a professional contract by the St. Louis Cardinals as a pitcher in 1938, Musial had arm problems and performed erratically on the mound for two seasons. On the recommendation of minor league manager Dickie Kerr, Musial was converted into an outfielder and made his major league debut in 1941.

Noted for his unique batting stance, he quickly established himself as a consistent and productive hitter. In his first full season, 1942, the Cardinals won the World Series. The following year, he led the NL in six different offensive categories and earned his first MVP award. He was also named to the NL All-Star squad for the first time; he appeared in every All-Star game in every subsequent season he played. Musial won his second World Series championship in 1944, then missed the entire 1945 season while serving in the Navy.

After completing his military service during the war, Musial returned to baseball in 1946 and resumed his consistent hitting. That year he earned his second MVP award and third World Series title. His third MVP award came in 1948, when he finished one home run short of winning baseball's Triple Crown. After struggling offensively in 1959, Musial used a personal trainer to help maintain his productivity until he decided to retire in 1963. At the time of his retirement, he held or shared 17 major league records, 29 National League records, and nine All-Star Game records. Ironically, in 1964, the season following his retirement, the Cardinals went on to defeat the New York Yankees in an epic 7-game clash, for St. Louis' first World Series championship in nearly two decades (a team which included future Hall of Famer Lou Brock performing what would have likely been Musial's left field duties). In addition to overseeing businesses, such as a restaurant both before and after his playing career, Musial served as the Cardinals' general manager in 1967, winning the pennant and World Series, then quitting that position. He also became noted for his harmonica playing, a skill he acquired during his playing career. Known for his modesty and sportsmanship, Musial was selected for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999. In February 2011, President Barack Obama presented Musial with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian awards that can be bestowed on a person by the United States government.

Travis Jackson

Travis Calvin Jackson (November 2, 1903 – July 27, 1987) was an American baseball shortstop. In Major League Baseball (MLB), Jackson played for the New York Giants from 1922 through 1936, winning the 1933 World Series, and representing the Giants in the MLB All-Star in 1934. After his retirement as a player, Jackson managed in minor league baseball through to the 1960 season.

Jackson was discovered by Kid Elberfeld at a minor league baseball game at the age of 14. Elberfeld signed Jackson to his first professional contract, and recommended him to John McGraw, manager of the Giants. His exceptional range at shortstop led to the nickname "Stonewall." Jackson was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.

Pitchers
Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
Shortstops
Outfielders
Designated hitters
Managers
Executives /
pioneers
Umpires
1930s–1940s
1950s–1960s
1970s–1980s
1990s–2000s
2010s–2020s

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