List of largest Canadian cities by census

This is a list of the largest cities in Canada by census starting with the 1871 Census of Canada, the first national census. Only communities that were incorporated as cities at the time of each census are presented. Therefore, this list does not include any incorporated towns that may have been larger than any incorporated cities at each census.

Canadian pop from 1851 to 1921
A collection of four maps showing the distribution of population for 1851 (Newfoundland 1857), 1871 (Newfoundland 1869), 1901 and 1921 by historical region.

1871

Rank City Population[1] Notes
1 Montreal, Quebec 107,225 Ranked #2 in 2016.[2]
2 Quebec, Quebec 59,699 Ranked #11 in 2016.[2]
3 Toronto, Ontario 56,092 Ranked #1 in 2016.[2]
4 Halifax, Nova Scotia 29,582 Ranked #14 in 2016 as a regional municipality.[2]
5 Saint John, New Brunswick 28,805 Saint John was incorporated in 1785 to become Canada’s first incorporated city.[3] Ranked #83 in 2016.[2]
6 Hamilton, Ontario 26,716 Ranked #10 in 2016.[2]
7 Ottawa, Ontario 21,545 Ranked #4 in 2016.[2]
8 London, Ontario 15,826 Ranked #15 in 2016.[2]
9 Portland, New Brunswick 12,520 Portland was a city until 1889 when it amalgamated with Saint John, New Brunswick.[4]
10 Kingston, Ontario 12,407 Ranked #43 in 2016.[2]

1881

Rank City Population[1]
1 Montreal, Quebec 140,747
2 Toronto, Ontario 86,415
3 Quebec, Quebec 62,446
4 Halifax, Nova Scotia 36,100
5 Hamilton, Ontario 35,961
6 Ottawa, Ontario 27,412
7 Saint John, New Brunswick 26,127
8 London, Ontario 19,746
9 Portland, New Brunswick 15,226
10 Kingston, Ontario 14,091

1891

Rank City Population[5]
1 Montreal, Quebec 219,650
2 Toronto, Ontario 181,220
3 Quebec, Quebec 63,090
4 Hamilton, Ontario 48,980
5 Ottawa, Ontario 44,154
6 Saint John, New Brunswick 39,179
7 Halifax, Nova Scotia 38,556
8 London, Ontario 31,977
9 Winnipeg, Manitoba 25,642
10 Kingston, Ontario 19,264

1901

Rank City Population[6]
1 Montreal, Quebec 267,730
2 Toronto, Ontario 208,040
3 Quebec, Quebec 68,840
4 Ottawa, Ontario 59,928
5 Hamilton, Ontario 52,634
6 Winnipeg, Manitoba 42,340
7 Halifax, Nova Scotia 40,832
8 Saint John, New Brunswick 40,711
9 London, Ontario 37,981
10 Vancouver, British Columbia 26,133

1911

Source: Canada Year Book 1932[7]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 490,504
2 Toronto, Ontario 381,383
3 Winnipeg, Manitoba 136,035
4 Vancouver, British Columbia 120,847
5 Ottawa, Ontario 87,082
6 Hamilton, Ontario 81,960
7 Quebec, Quebec 78,710
8 Halifax, Nova Scotia 46,619
9 London, Ontario 46,309
10 Calgary, Alberta 43,704

1921

Cities west of Ontario take up four of the top ten spots in this census. Many Western cities will grow quickly during the 20th century, in large part, because they are able to expand their borders. Source: Canada Year Book 1932[7]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 618,506
2 Toronto, Ontario 521,893
3 Winnipeg, Manitoba 179,087
4 Vancouver, British Columbia 162,229
5 Hamilton, Ontario 114,151
6 Ottawa, Ontario 107,843
7 Quebec, Quebec 95,193
8 Calgary, Alberta 63,305
9 London, Ontario 60,959
10 Edmonton, Alberta 58,821

1931

Source: Canada Year Book 1932[7]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 818,517
2 Toronto, Ontario 631,207
3 Vancouver, British Columbia 246,593
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 218,785
5 Hamilton, Ontario 155,547
6 Quebec, Quebec 130,594
7 Ottawa, Ontario 126,872
8 Calgary, Alberta 83,761
9 Edmonton, Alberta 79,197
10 London, Ontario 71,148

1941

Source: Canada Year Book 1955[8]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 903,007
2 Toronto, Ontario 667,567
3 Vancouver, British Columbia 275,353
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 221,960
5 Hamilton, Ontario 166,337
6 Ottawa, Ontario 154,951
7 Quebec, Quebec 150,757
8 Windsor, Ontario 105,311
9 Edmonton, Alberta 93,817
10 Calgary, Alberta 88,904

1951

Source: Canada Year Book 1955[8]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 1,021,520
2 Toronto, Ontario 675,754
3 Vancouver, British Columbia 344,843
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 235,710
5 Hamilton, Ontario 208,321
6 Ottawa, Ontario 202,045
7 Quebec, Quebec 164,016
8 Edmonton, Alberta 159,631
9 Calgary, Alberta 129,060
10 Windsor, Ontario 120,040

1956

Source: Canada Year Book 1957-58[9]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 1,109,439
2 Toronto, Ontario 667,706
3 Vancouver, British Columbia 364,844
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 255,093
5 Hamilton, Ontario 239,625
6 Edmonton, Alberta 226,002
7 Ottawa, Ontario 222,129
8 Calgary, Alberta 181,780
9 Quebec, Quebec 170,703
10 Windsor, Ontario 121,980

1961

Source: Canada Year Book 1967[10]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 1,191,062
2 Toronto, Ontario 672,407
3 Vancouver, British Columbia 384,522
4 Edmonton, Alberta 281,022
5 Hamilton, Ontario 273,991
6 Ottawa, Ontario 268,206
7 Winnipeg, Manitoba 265,429
8 Calgary, Alberta 249,632
9 Quebec, Quebec 171,979
10 London, Ontario 169,569

1971

Source: Canada Year Book 1972

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 1,214,351
2 Toronto, Ontario 712,786
3 Edmonton, Alberta 438,152
4 Vancouver, British Columbia 426,256
5 Calgary, Alberta 403,319
6 Hamilton, Ontario 309,173
7 Ottawa, Ontario 302,241
8 Winnipeg, Manitoba 246,246
9 Laval, Quebec 228,010
10 London, Ontario 223,222

1981

Though Winnipeg's population more than doubled in large part to amalgamation of its surrounding municipalities, a number of Canadian cities suffered population losses during the 1970s. Source: Canada Year Book 1988

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 980,354
2 Toronto, Ontario 599,217
3 Calgary, Alberta 592,743
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 564,473
5 North York, Ontario 559,521
6 Edmonton, Alberta 532,246
7 Vancouver, British Columbia 414,281
8 Mississauga, Ontario 315,056
9 Hamilton, Ontario 306,434
10 Ottawa, Ontario 295,033

1986

Source: Government of Canada Publications[11]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 1,015,420
2 Calgary, Alberta 636,104
3 Toronto, Ontario 612,289
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 594,551
5 Edmonton, Alberta 573,982
6 North York, Ontario 556,297
7 Scarborough, Ontario 484,676
8 Vancouver, British Columbia 431,147
9 Mississauga, Ontario 374,005
10 Hamilton, Ontario 306,728

1991

Source : Statistics Canada Community Profiles: Census 1991

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 1,017,666
2 Calgary, Alberta 710,677
3 Toronto, Ontario 635,395
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 616,790
5 Edmonton, Alberta 616,741
6 North York, Ontario 563,270
7 Scarborough, Ontario 524,598
8 Vancouver, British Columbia 471,844
9 Mississauga, Ontario 463,388
10 Hamilton, Ontario 318,499

1996

Source: Georef 1996 Census[12]

Rank City Population
1 Montreal, Quebec 1,016,376
2 Calgary, Alberta 768,082
3 Toronto, Ontario 653,734
4 Winnipeg, Manitoba 618,477
5 Edmonton, Alberta 616,306
6 North York, Ontario 589,653
7 Scarborough, Ontario 558,960
8 Mississauga, Ontario 544,382
9 Vancouver, British Columbia 514,008
10 Laval, Quebec 330,393

2001

A wave of amalgamations took place in Ontario during the 1990s and 2000s that adjusted city population figures.

Rank City Population[13] Notes
1 Toronto, Ontario 2,481,494 Toronto amalgamated with six surrounding municipalities on January 1, 1998.[14]
2 Montreal, Quebec 1,039,534
3 Calgary, Alberta 879,003
4 Ottawa, Ontario 774,072 Ottawa amalgamated with 11 surrounding municipalities on January 1, 2001.[14]
5 Edmonton, Alberta 666,104
6 Winnipeg, Manitoba 619,544
7 Mississauga, Ontario 612,000
8 Vancouver, British Columbia 545,671
9 Hamilton, Ontario 490,268 Hamilton amalgamated with six surrounding municipalities on January 1, 2001.[14]
10 Surrey, British Columbia 347,825

2006

The wave of amalgamations extended into the province of Quebec: in 2002, both Montreal and Quebec City combined with a number of smaller surrounding cities, some of which later chose to leave the amalgamation. Source : Statistics Canada Community Profiles: Census 2006

Rank City Population
1 Toronto, Ontario 2,503,281
2 Montreal, Quebec 1,620,693
3 Calgary, Alberta 988,193
4 Ottawa, Ontario 812,129
5 Edmonton, Alberta 730,372
6 Mississauga, Ontario 668,549
7 Winnipeg, Manitoba 633,451
8 Vancouver, British Columbia 578,041
9 Hamilton, Ontario 504,559
10 Quebec, Quebec 491,452

2011

Rank City Population
1 Toronto, Ontario 2,615,060
2 Montreal, Quebec 1,649,519
3 Calgary, Alberta 1,096,833
4 Ottawa, Ontario 883,391
5 Edmonton, Alberta 821,201
6 Mississauga, Ontario 713,443
7 Winnipeg, Manitoba 663,617
8 Vancouver, British Columbia 603,502
9 Brampton, Ontario 523,911
10 Hamilton, Ontario 519,949

2016

Rank City Population[2]
1 Toronto, Ontario 2,731,571
2 Montreal, Quebec 1,704,694
3 Calgary, Alberta 1,239,220
4 Ottawa, Ontario 934,243
5 Edmonton, Alberta 932,546
6 Mississauga, Ontario 721,599
7 Winnipeg, Manitoba 705,244
8 Vancouver, British Columbia 631,486
9 Brampton, Ontario 593,638
10 Hamilton, Ontario 536,917

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Census of Canada, 1880-81. Volume I. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1882.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 19, 2017.
  3. ^ "History of Saint John". City of Saint John. Retrieved April 3, 2014.
  4. ^ "Canada's Historic Places: W. A. Chesley Residence". Parks Canada. Retrieved April 3, 2014.
  5. ^ Census of Canada, 1890-91. Volume I. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1893.
  6. ^ Fourth Census of Canada, 1901. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1902.
  7. ^ a b c [1], Censuses 1871-1931
  8. ^ a b [2], Census 1941-1951
  9. ^ [3] Census 1956
  10. ^ [4], Census 1961
  11. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, Canada (1987)". Government of Canada Publications. Statistics Canada. Retrieved September 3, 2017.
  12. ^ [5] 1996 Census
  13. ^ "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada and Census Subdivisions (Municipalities), 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data". Statistics Canada. Retrieved April 3, 2014.
  14. ^ a b c "Municipal Restructuring Activity Summary Table" (PDF). Ontario Municipal Affairs and Housing. Retrieved April 3, 2014.
Census in Canada

A national census in Canada is conducted every five years by Statistics Canada. The census provides demographic and statistical data that is used to plan public services including health care, education, and transportation, determine federal transfer payments, and determine the number of Members of Parliament for each province and territory. At a sub-national level, two provinces (Alberta and Saskatchewan) and two territories (Nunavut and Yukon) have legislation that allows local governments to conduct their own municipal censuses.In an article in the New York Times in August 2015, journalist Stephen Marche argued that by ending the mandatory long-form census in 2011, the federal government "stripped Canada of its capacity to gather information about itself" in the "age of information." Nearly 500 organizations in Canada, including the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and the Canadian Catholic Council of Bishops, protested the decision to replace the long form Census in 2011 with a shorter version.On November 5, 2015, during the first Liberal caucus meeting since forming a majority government, the party announced that it would reinstate the mandatory long-form census, starting in 2016.

There have been questions about religion in Canada in the national Census since 1871, in 1951 when the national census was switched from being collected every 10 years to every 5 years, questions about religion were still only asked every 10 years. Religion questions were not included in the 2016 National Household Survey.

List of Canadian provinces and territories by population

Canada is divided into ten provinces and three territories. The majority of Canada's population is concentrated in the areas close to the Canada–US border. Its four largest provinces by area (Quebec, Ontario, British Columbia and Alberta) are also (with Quebec and Ontario, switched in order) its most populous; together they account for 86% of the country's population. The territories (the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon) account for over a third of Canada's area but are home to only 0.3% of its population, which skews the national population density value.

Canada's population grew by 5.0% between the 2006 and 2011 censuses. Except for New Brunswick, all territories and provinces increased in population from 2011 to 2016. In terms of percent change, the fastest-growing province or territory was Nunavut with an increase of 12.7% between 2011 and 2016, followed by Alberta with 11.6% growth. New Brunswick's population decreased by 0.5% between 2011 and 2016.

Canada's population has increased every year since Confederation in 1867: see List of population of Canada by years.

List of census divisions of Canada by population

The following table lists Canada's census divisions by population in the Canada 2011 Census, from highest to lowest. Clicking on the province's two letter abbreviation will take you to a list of census divisions for that province with links.

List of cities in Canada

This is a list of incorporated cities in Canada, in alphabetical order categorized by province or territory. More thorough lists of communities are available for each province.

List of the 100 largest cities and towns in Canada by area

Canada had 1,137 municipalities that held city, town or ville status as of 2011. This list presents the 100 largest of these municipalities by land area in square kilometres at the time of the 2011 census. Municipalities with other statuses and unincorporated areas are excluded.

List of the 100 largest municipalities in Canada by population

The table below lists the 100 largest census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) in Canada by population, using data from the Canada 2016 census for census subdivisions.This list includes only the population within a census subdivision's boundaries as defined at the time of the census. Many census subdivisions are part of a larger census metropolitan area or census agglomeration. For their ranking, see the list of census metropolitan areas and agglomerations in Canada.

List of the 100 largest population centres in Canada

A population centre, in the context of a Canadian census, is a populated place, or a cluster of interrelated populated places, which meets the demographic characteristics of an urban area, having a population of at least 1,000 people and a population density of no fewer than 400 people per square km2.The term was first introduced in the Canada 2011 Census; prior to that, Statistics Canada used the term urban area.Statistics Canada listed 944 population centres in its 2011 census data; 513 of them, 54 per cent of all population centres in Canada, were located in Ontario or Quebec, the two most populous provinces.

List of towns in Canada

This is a list of towns in Canada. Only municipalities currently incorporated as towns are listed here.

Lists of the 100 largest cities in Canada by population

The largest cities in Canada by population may refer to:

List of census metropolitan areas and agglomerations in Canada, metropolitan areas as defined by Statistics Canada.

List of the 100 largest municipalities in Canada by population, municipalities ranging from cities to rural districts.

List of the 100 largest population centres in Canada, population centres (formerly urban areas) based on continuous population density, regardless of municipal boundaries.

Population of Canada

Canada ranks 38 comprising about 0.5% of the world's total population, with over 37 million Canadians as of 2018. Despite having the 2nd largest landmass, the vast majority of the country is sparsely inhabited, with most of its population south of the 55th parallel north and more than half of Canadians live in just two provinces: Ontario and Quebec. Though Canada's population density is low, many regions in the south such as the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor, have population densities higher than several European countries. Canada's largest population centres are Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton and Ottawa with those six being the only ones with more than one million people. The large size of Canada's north which is not arable, and thus cannot support large human populations, significantly lowers the carrying capacity. Therefore, the population density of the habitable land in Canada can be modest to high depending on the region.

The historical growth of Canada's population is complex and has been influenced in many different ways, such as indigenous populations, expansion of territory, and human migration. Being a new world country, Canada has been predisposed to be a very open society with regards to immigration, which has been the most important factor in its historical population growth. The 2016 Canadian census counted a total population of 35,151,728, an increase of around 5.0 percent over the 2011 figure. Between 1990 and 2008, the population increased by 5.6 million, equivalent to 20.4 percent overall growth.

Regional municipality

A regional municipality (or region) is a type of Canadian municipal government similar to and at the same municipal government level as a county, although the specific structure and servicing responsibilities may vary from place to place. Regional municipalities were formed in highly populated areas where it was considered more efficient to provide certain services, such as water, emergency services, and waste management over an area encompassing more than one local municipality. For this reason, regions may be involved in providing services to residents and businesses.

Regional municipalities, where they include smaller municipalities within their boundaries, are sometimes referred to as "upper-tier" municipalities. Regional municipalities generally have more servicing responsibilities than counties. Typical services include maintenance and construction of arterial roads (including in urban areas, where counties do not), transit, policing, sewer and water systems, waste disposal, region-wide land-use planning and development and health and social services.

Regions are typically more urbanized than counties. Regional municipalities are usually implemented in census divisions where an interconnected cluster of urban centres forms the majority of the division's area and population.

Canada
History
Provinces
and territories
Government
Politics
Geography
Economy
Society
Demographics
Culture
Symbols
Article overviews
Research
Topics
By province
By city
Census in Canada
Lists

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.