List of highest-grossing concert tours

This is an incomplete list of the highest-grossing concert tours. Only tours using reliable references and having grossed over $100 million (adjusted for inflation) have been added to the list. Some of the gross may be higher than reported on this list because not all concerts are reported. Billboard and Pollstar regularly provide the official figure of concerts' gross revenue worldwide.

Tours that span multiple decades are included in the decade that they concluded.

In bold, the tours which, when completed, became the highest-grossing of all time.

U2 360 Tour Croke Park 2
The 360° Tour by U2 is the highest-grossing concert tour of all time.

Highest-grossing tours of all time

Stones ad 1965-2

The Rolling Stones had claimed the highest-grossing tour four multiple times, with the latest being A Bigger Bang Tour (currently the fourth).

Roger Waters 18 May 2008 London O2 Arena

Roger Waters completed The Wall Live as the highest-grossing tour of all time by a solo artist.

Rolandmadonna1

Madonna scored the highest-grossing concert tour of all time by a female artist with the Sticky & Sweet Tour.

OnedirectionWWATchile

One Direction completed their Where We Are Tour as the highest-grossing tour of all time by a vocal group.

This list represents the top 20 grossing tours (by actual gross, not adjusted for inflation) of all time.

Rank Actual gross Gross adjusted for inflation
(2019 $)
Artist Tour name Year(s) Shows Attendance Average gross per show (millions) Average attendance per show Ref.
1 $736,421,584 $820,194,986 U2 U2 360° Tour 2009–11 110 7,272,046 $6.7 66,110 [1]
2 $573,300,000 $573,300,000 Ed Sheeran ÷ Tour 2017– present 205 6,386,364 $2.71 31,153 [2][3]
3 $563,300,000 $563,300,000 Guns N' Roses Not in This Lifetime... Tour 2016–18 159 4,377,126 $3.85 35,017 [4][2][3]
4 $558,255,524 $674,547,559 The Rolling Stones A Bigger Bang Tour 2005–07 144 4,680,000 $3.8 32,500 [1]
5 $523,033,675 $546,023,369 Coldplay A Head Full of Dreams Tour 2016–17 114 5,389,586 $4.59 45,128 [5]
6 $458,673,798 $493,336,432 Roger Waters The Wall Live 2010–13 219 4,129,863 $2.09 18,858 [6]
7 $441,121,000 $506,821,305 AC/DC Black Ice World Tour 2008–10 167 4,846,965 $2.6 29,023 [7][8][9]
8 $407,713,266 $476,474,639 Madonna Sticky & Sweet Tour 2008–09 85 3,545,899 $4.79 41,716 [10]
9 $389,047,636 $483,515,954 U2 Vertigo Tour 2005–06 131 4,719,021 $2.96 35,259 [11]
10 $364,300,000 $364,300,000 Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood World Tour 2014–17 390 6,443,727 $0.96 14,669 [12][13][14][15]
11 $362,000,000 $421,251,623 The Police The Police Reunion Tour 2007–08 156 3,300,912 $2.3 21,160 [16]
12 $355,600,000 $415,280,347 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Wrecking Ball World Tour 2012–13 136 3,650,535 $2.8 18,744 [17][18]
13 $345,700,000 $345,700,000 Taylor Swift Taylor Swift's Reputation Stadium Tour 2018 53 2,888,892 $6.5 54,507 [19] [20]
14 $320,000,000 $526,158,550 The Rolling Stones Voodoo Lounge Tour 1994–95 124 6,336,776 $2.6 51,103 [21]
15 $316,990,940 $324,005,537 U2 The Joshua Tree Tour 2017 2017 51 2,713,136 $6.3 53,198 [22][23]
16 $311,000,000 $423,574,349 The Rolling Stones Licks Tour 2002–03 115 3,470,945 $2.6 30,182 [24]
17 $306,500,000 $319,972,060 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band The River Tour 2016 2016–17 89 2,667,775 $4.0 29,020 [4][25]
18 $305,158,363 $333,024,687 Madonna The MDNA Tour 2012 88 2,212,345 $3.47 25,140 [24]
19 $301,000,000 $301,000,000 Billy Joel Billy Joel in Concert 2014–present 120 2,065,755 $2.2 22,205 [12][13][4][25][15]
20 $290,178,452 $307,106,208 One Direction Where We Are Tour 2014 69 3,439,560 $4.2 49,848 [26]

Highest-grossing tours by decade

1980s

Rank Actual gross Inflation
(adjusted 2019 gross)
Artist Tour name Year(s) Shows Attendance Average
gross (millions)
Average
attendance
Ref.
1 $135,000,000 $272,863,087 Pink Floyd A Momentary Lapse of Reason Tour 1987–89 197 5,500,000 0.68 21,250 [27][28]
2 $125,738,964 $266,372,724 Michael Jackson Bad 1987–89 123 4,498,300 1.02 36,571 [29][30]
3 $98,000,000 $198,078,389 The Rolling Stones Steel Wheels Tour 1989–90 115 3,253,563 0.85 28,291 [31][32]
4 $86,000,000 $189,658,465 David Bowie Glass Spider Tour 1987 86 3,000,000 1.0 34,884 [33][34]
5 $85,000,000 $198,008,973 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Born in the U.S.A. Tour 1984–85 156 0.55 [35]
6 $75,000,000 $180,869,635 The Jacksons Victory Tour 1984 55 2,750,000 1.36 50,000 [36]
7 $56,278,095 $124,111,827 U2 The Joshua Tree Tour 1987 109 3,176,952 0.5 29,146 [37]
8 $52,000,000 $143,304,539 The Rolling Stones The Rolling Stones American Tour 1981 1981 50 3,000,000 1.04 60,000 [36]

1990s

Rank Actual gross Inflation
(adjusted 2019 gross)
Artist Tour name Year(s) Shows Attendance Average
gross (millions)
Average
attendance
Ref.
1 $320,000,000 $526,158,550 The Rolling Stones Voodoo Lounge Tour 1994–95 129 6,336,776 2.6 51,103 [21]
2 $274,000,000 $421,181,298 The Rolling Stones Bridges to Babylon Tour 1997–98 108 [24]
3 $250,000,000 $422,597,665 Pink Floyd The Division Bell Tour 1994 110 6,000,000 2.3 45,000 [38]
4 $171,677,027 $267,942,856 U2 PopMart Tour 1997–98 93 3,936,841 1.8 42,332 [37]
5 $165,000,000 $257,521,766 Michael Jackson HIStory World Tour 1996–97 83 4,500,000 2.01 54,878 [39]
6 $151,000,000 $261,893,343 U2 Zoo TV Tour 1992–93 157 5,350,554 0.96 34,080 [37][40]
7 $142,700,000[a] $234,633,828 Eagles Hell Freezes Over Tour 1994–95 [41][42]
8 $105,000,000 $161,401,592 Garth Brooks The Garth Brooks World Tour 1996–98 220 5,500,000 0.49 25,346 [43][44]
9 $100,300,000 $141,911,870 Michael Jackson Dangerous Tour 1992–93 69 3,746,000 – 3,925,000 57,000 [45]
10 $74,000,000 $141,911,870 New Kids on the Block The Magic Summer Tour 1990–91 152 3,291,987 21,657 [32]
11 $70,000,000 $121,407,510 Madonna The Girlie Show World Tour 1993 39 1.79 [46][47]
12 $62,700,000 $120,241,544 Madonna Blond Ambition World Tour 1990 57 1.1 [48][47]

2000s

Rank Actual gross Inflation
(adjusted
2019 gross)
Artist Tour name Year(s) Shows Attendance Average
gross (millions)
Average
attendance
Ref.
1 $558,255,524 $674,547,559 The Rolling Stones A Bigger Bang Tour 2005–07 144 4,680,000 3.8 32,500 [1]
2 $441,121,000 $495,041,025 AC/DC Black Ice World Tour 2008–10 167 4,846,965 2.6 29,023 [10]
3 $408,000,000 $476,474,639 Madonna Sticky & Sweet Tour 2008–09 85 3,545,899 4.79 41,716 [10]
4 $389,047,636 $483,515,954 U2 Vertigo Tour 2005–06 131 4,619,021 2.96 35,259 [11]
5 $362,000,000 $421,251,623 The Police The Police Reunion Tour 2007–08 156 3,300,912 2.3 21,160 [16]
6 $311,000,000 $423,574,349 The Rolling Stones Licks Tour 2002–03 115 3,470,945 2.6 30,182 [24]
7 $279,200,000 $324,899,042 Celine Dion Taking Chances World Tour 2008–09 132 2,600,000 2.1 19,697 [7][8][49]
8 $250,000,000 $320,710,513 Cher Living Proof: The Farewell Tour 2002–05 326 3,500,000 0.6 10,800 [50]
9 $235,000,000 $273,464,451 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Magic Tour 2007–08 100 2,198,353 2.4 21,983 [51]
10 $221,500,000 $301,677,551 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band The Rising Tour 2002–03 120 3,232,384 1.8 31,081 [52]
11 $210,650,974 $245,130,013 Bon Jovi Lost Highway Tour 2007–08 99 2,157,675 2.1 21,794 [51]
12 $194,754,447 $242,044,607 Madonna Confessions Tour 2006 60 1,210,294 3.2 20,171 [53]
13 $167,000,000 $195,027,610 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Working on a Dream Tour 2009 80 1,831,770 2.1 22,897 [8]
14 $142,844,463 $202,119,143 U2 Elevation Tour 2001 112 2,162,282 1.3 19,306 [54]
15 $141,000,000 $170,372,171 Tim McGraw and Faith Hill Soul2Soul II Tour 2006–07 117 1,673,667 1.2 14,304 [55]
16 $132,500,000 $154,737,475 Tina Turner Tina!: 50th Anniversary Tour 2008–09 90 1,176,199 1.47 13,068 [7][8]
17 $131,800,000 $153,919,994 Britney Spears The Circus Starring Britney Spears 2009 97 1,500,000 1.4 15,488 [8]
18 $131,388,461 $163,292,130 Bon Jovi Have a Nice Day Tour 2005–06 89 1,823,834 1.7 23,382 [56]
19 $129,059,653 $155,944,492 Genesis Turn It On Again: The Tour 2007 46 1,262,393 2.8 27,443 [57][58]
20 $126,800,000 $153,214,123 Justin Timberlake FutureSex/LoveShow 2007 119 1,600,000 1 13,445 [59]

2010s

Rank Actual gross Inflation
(adjusted 2019 gross)
Artist Tour name Year(s) Shows Attendance Average
gross (millions)
Average
attendance
Ref.
1 $736,421,584 $820,194,986 U2 U2 360° Tour 2009–11 110 7,272,046 6.7 66,110 [1]
2 $563,300,000 $563,300,000 Guns N' Roses Not in This Lifetime... Tour 2016–18 159 4,377,126 3.85 35,017 [4][2][3]
3 $556,500,000 $556,500,000 Ed Sheeran ÷ Tour 2017– present 205 6,386,364 2.71 31,153 [2][3]
4 $523,033,675 $546,023,369 Coldplay A Head Full of Dreams Tour 2016–17 114 5,389,536 4.59 45,128 [5]
5 $458,673,798 $493,336,432 Roger Waters The Wall 2010–13 219 4,129,863 2.09 18,858 [6]
6 $441,121,000 $506,821,305 AC/DC Black Ice World Tour 2008–10 167 4,846,965 2.6 29,023 [7][8][9]
7 $364,300,000 $324,565,460 Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood The Garth Brooks World Tour with Trisha Yearwood 2014–17 366 4,743,727 0.96 14,669 [12][13][14][15]
8 $355,600,000 $382,473,200 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Wrecking Ball World Tour 2012–13 127 3,650,535 2.8 28,744 [17][18]
9 $345,700,000 $345,600,000 Taylor Swift Taylor Swift's Reputation Stadium Tour 2018 53 2,888,918 6.5 54,507 [19]
10 $316,000,000 $329,889,628 U2 The Joshua Tree Tour 2017 2017 51 2,713,136 6.19 53,198 [22]
11 $306,500,000 $319,972,060 Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band The River Tour 2016 2016–17 89 2,667,775 4.0 29,020 [13][14]
12 $305,158,363 $333,024,687 Madonna The MDNA Tour 2012 88 2,212,345 3.47 25,140 [24]
13 $301,000,000 $301,000,000 Billy Joel Billy Joel in Concert 2014–present 120 2,065,755 2.2 22,205 [12][13][4][25][15]
14 $290,178,452 $307,106,208 One Direction Where We Are Tour 2014 69 3,449,560 4.2 49,848 [26]
15 $275,700,000 $291,414,474 Paul McCartney Out There! Tour 2013–15 84 1,958,754 3.28 23,319 [18][12][13]
16 $259,500,000 $279,110,786 Bon Jovi Because We Can 2013 102 2,657,502 2.67 27,397 [18]
17 $256,500,000 $267,774,334 Justin Bieber Purpose World Tour 2016–17 149 2,757,368 1.8 20,484 [4][25]
18 $256,084,556 $267,340,630 Beyoncé The Formation World Tour 2016 49 2,242,099 5.2 45,757 [60]
19 $253,618,867 $253,618,867 Beyoncé and Jay-Z On the Run II Tour 2018 48 2,169,049 5.28 45,189 [61]
20 $251,112,882 $288,513,488 Eagles Long Road Out of Eden Tour 2008–11 155 2,001,773 1.6 12,915 [7][8][9][62]

Notes

  1. ^ Figure for Hell Freezes Over Tour only includes North American dates. Official data for the rest of the world tour is unavailable.

See also

References

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A Momentary Lapse of Reason Tour

A Momentary Lapse of Reason Tour was a concert tour by the British rock band Pink Floyd from 1987 to 1989 in support of their album A Momentary Lapse of Reason. The tour was the band's first since The Wall Tour in 1981, and also the first without the band's original bassist Roger Waters. The band later reprised the set-list and stage show of this tour for their performance at Knebworth Park in 1990.

Arthur Fogel

Arthur Fogel is a Canadian music promoter.

Because We Can (concert tour)

Because We Can was a concert tour by American rock band, Bon Jovi. The tour was in support of the band's twelfth studio album What About Now. The tour was named after the lead single from What About Now. All five major continents were visited during the 2013 tour. The tour saw the band travel to Wales for the first time in 12 years since their 2001 One Wild Night Tour and was also the first time in 18 years since their 1995 These Days Tour that the band returned to Africa for two dates in South Africa. Furthermore, the tour also saw the band travel to Cologne performing in the RheinEnergieStadion also for the first time in 12 years since their 2001 tour, this tour was the first time in the band's 30-year history that they visited Bulgaria and Poland. The tour ranked 1st on Pollstar's annual "Top 100 Mid Year Worldwide Tours". It earned $142.1 million from 60 shows. At the end of 2013, the tour placed 1st on Pollstar's "Top 100 Worldwide Tours", grossing $259.5 million from 102 shows.This is the band's last tour to feature guitarist Richie Sambora, as he left the band during the initial leg and first show in Canada, informing the band via management just hours before the show took place. He would not return for the remainder of the dates.

The J. Geils Band played opening act for some shows in the summer dates.

Bridges to Babylon Tour

The Bridges to Babylon Tour was a worldwide concert tour by The Rolling Stones. Staged in support of their album Bridges to Babylon, the tour visited stadiums from 1997 to 1998. It grossed over $274 million, becoming the second-highest-grossing tour at that time, behind their own Voodoo Lounge Tour of 1994–1995.

The Bridges to Babylon Tour was followed by 1999's No Security Tour.

Driving World Tour

The Driving World Tour was Paul McCartney's first concert tour of the 21st century and of any kind since 1993's New World Tour. For the first time in nearly a decade, McCartney returned to the road following the death of first wife, Linda McCartney, the death of George Harrison, and 9/11. This was in promotion of his 2001 album Driving Rain. Paul "Wix" Wickens returned on keyboards and is credited as Musical Director. New to the fold were Americans Rusty Anderson, Brian Ray, and Abe Laboriel Jr. Paul McCartney's then-fiancée Heather Mills accompanied him on the tour and was in the audience for every American performance.

FutureSex/LoveShow

The FutureSex/LoveShow was the third concert tour by American singer-songwriter Justin Timberlake. It showcased his second studio album, FutureSex/LoveSounds (2006). The tour grossed $127.8 million. It was the third highest-grossing concert tour of 2007.

HIStory World Tour

The History World Tour (stylized as HIStory World Tour) was the final worldwide solo concert tour by American artist Michael Jackson, covering Europe, Africa, Asia, Oceania and North America. The tour included a total of 82 concerts spanning the globe with stops in 57 cities, 35 countries on 5 continents.

Have a Nice Day Tour

The Have a Nice Day Tour was a worldwide concert tour by American rock band Bon Jovi. It took place between November 2005 and July 2006. The tour supported their ninth studio album Have a Nice Day.

The tour was a significant commercial success, as the group played to ~2,000,000 fans, and the tour grossed a total $132 million. The tour was the third-highest-grossing tour of 2006, just behind The Rolling Stones' A Bigger Bang World Tour and Madonna's Confessions Tour.

Licks Tour

The Licks Tour was a worldwide concert tour undertaken by The Rolling Stones during 2002 and 2003, in support of their 40th anniversary compilation album Forty Licks. The tour grossed over $300 million, becoming the second highest grossing tour at that time, behind their own Voodoo Lounge Tour of 1994–1995.The itinerary continued the Rolling Stones' practice of mixing theatre, arena, and stadium venues. With little new music to promote, set lists were dynamic and featured a total of 80 different songs.Planned dates in East Asia and the final date of the tour were cancelled in response to the SARS outbreak of 2002–2003. Additionally, because Toronto, Ontario, Canada was also affected, the Rolling Stones headlined the Molson Canadian Rocks for Toronto concert on 30 July 2003 to help the city recover from the effects of the epidemic. It was attended by an estimated 490,000 people. Finally, on 7–9 November 2003, the band played its first ever concerts in Hong Kong, as part of the Harbour Fest celebration. The tour was sponsored by E-Trade.

List of highest-attended concerts

This page lists the highest-attended concerts of all time. The oldest 100,000-crowd concert reported to Billboard Boxscore is Grateful Dead's gig at the Raceway Park, Englishtown, New Jersey on September 3, 1977. The concert was attended by 107,019 people, which remains the largest ticketed concert in the United States to date. Frank Sinatra, Tina Turner, and Paul McCartney broke the record respectively in Maracanã Stadium. With an audience of over 184,000 people on April 21, 1990, McCartney held the record for 27 years. Italian singer Vasco Rossi surpassed McCartney's record with his solo concert on July 1, 2017. The concert was a celebration of his 40 years of career.

Although the attendance numbers of free concerts are known to be exaggerations, several concerts have been reported to have a million audience or more. According to the Guinness World Records, Rod Stewart's show in Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, remains the highest-attended free concert with an estimated 3.5 million audience.

Lists of concert tours

This is an index of lists of concert tours.

On the Run II Tour

The On the Run II Tour was the second co-headlining stadium tour by American singer Beyoncé and rapper Jay-Z, also known as the Carters. The tour was officially announced on March 12, 2018, and began on June 6, 2018 in Cardiff. It concluded on October 4, 2018 in Seattle. This is their first tour together since On the Run Tour in 2014.

On May 31, it was announced via Twitter that R&B duo Chloe x Halle and DJ Khaled would be the opening acts for the North American leg of the tour.Following the show in London on June 16, 2018, the pair released their collaborative album Everything Is Love exclusively on Tidal. The news of the duo's new album was announced by a showing of the music video for its lead single, "Apeshit,” followed by a sign on stage which announced "ALBUM OUT NOW”. The release was then shared on the artists' respective Instagram and Facebook profiles with the artist of the album being dubbed as The Carters. On the same day, the music video for "Apeshit", was released on Beyoncé's official YouTube channel.

Steel Wheels/Urban Jungle Tour

The Rolling Stones' Steel Wheels Tour was a concert tour which was launched in North America in August 1989 to promote the band's album Steel Wheels; it continued to Japan in February 1990, with ten shows at the Tokyo Dome. The European leg of the tour, which featured a different stage and logo, was called the Urban Jungle Tour; it ran from May to August 1990. These would be the last live concerts for the band with original member Bill Wyman on bass guitar. This tour would also be the longest the band had ever done up to that point, playing over twice as many shows as their standard tour length from the 1960s and 1970s.

The tour was an enormous financial success, cementing The Rolling Stones' return to full commercial power after a seven-year hiatus in touring marked by well-publicized acrimony among band members.

The Division Bell Tour

The Division Bell Tour was the final concert tour by the English rock band Pink Floyd in 1994 to support their album The Division Bell, which was released two days before the tour’s start date. Though it was Pink Floyd’s final tour, members of the band have continued to perform the band's songs on solo tours.

In 1995 the band released the live album Pulse to commemorate the tour.

The Girlie Show World Tour

The Girlie Show World Tour (also referred to as simply The Girlie Show) was the fourth concert tour by American singer and songwriter Madonna, in support of her fifth studio album, Erotica. The tour visited the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Australia for the first time, selling 360,000 tickets in this leg only. Madonna's inspiration for the name of the tour was a painting called "Girlie Show" by Edward Hopper. The tour is estimated to have grossed over US$70 million. Two separate television specials were broadcast during the tour, one made during the Japanese leg of the tour and shown only on Japanese television; Madonna Live in Japan 1993 – The Girlie Show, and an HBO special Madonna Live Down Under – The Girlie Show which was later released in 1994 by Warner Music Vision on home video.

The Joshua Tree Tour

The Joshua Tree Tour was a concert tour by the Irish rock band U2, which took place during 1987, in support of their album The Joshua Tree. The tour was depicted by the video and live album Live from Paris and in the film and part-live album Rattle and Hum.

The Rolling Stones concerts

Since forming in 1962, the English rock band The Rolling Stones have performed more than two thousand concerts around the world, becoming one of the world's most popular live music attractions in the process.

In their early years of performing, the band would undertake numerous short tours of the United Kingdom and North America, playing in small- and medium-size venues to audiences composed largely of screaming girls. As time moved on, their audience base expanded (in terms of both size and diversity) and they would increasingly favour larger arenas and stadiums. For many years, the group would choose to play North America, Continental Europe, and the United Kingdom on a three-year rotating cycle.

Many audio recordings exist of Rolling Stones concerts, both official and unofficial. Seventeen official concert albums (eighteen in the US) have been released by the band; 6 of which were previously unreleased concert recordings released from 2011–2012, including the highly bootlegged Brussels Affair. Several of their concerts have also been filmed and released under a variety of titles, such as Stones in the Park which records the band's performance at Hyde Park in 1969.

The most famous and heavily documented of all the band's concerts was the Altamont Free Concert at the Altamont Speedway in 1969. For this concert, the biker gang Hells Angels provided security, which resulted in a fan, Meredith Hunter, being stabbed and beaten to death by the Angels after he drew a firearm. Part of the tour and the Altamont concert were documented in Albert and David Maysles' film Gimme Shelter. As a response to the growing popularity of bootleg recordings, the album Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out! (UK 1; US 6) was released in 1970; it was declared by critic Lester Bangs to be

the best live album ever.The biggest concert the band gave was in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during the "Bigger Bang Tour", in 2006.

Voodoo Lounge Tour

The Voodoo Lounge Tour was a worldwide concert tour by The Rolling Stones to promote their 1994 album Voodoo Lounge. This was their first tour without bassist Bill Wyman, and their first with touring bassist Darryl Jones. The tour grossed $320 million, replacing Pink Floyd's Division Bell tour as the highest grossing of any artist at that time. This was subsequently overtaken by a few other tours, but it remains The Rolling Stones' second highest grossing tour behind their 2005–2007 A Bigger Bang Tour."There were lots of hacks out there who said we couldn't do it anymore", remarked Mick Jagger. "But maybe what they meant was they couldn't do it anymore. Anyway, once we started playing, all that died down. You can talk about it and talk about it – but, once we're onstage, the question is answered."Production design was by Mark Fisher, Charlie Watts, Mick Jagger and Patrick Woodroffe. Graphic design and video animation was by Mark Norton. Total attendance 6.5 million.

Where We Are Tour (One Direction)

The Where We Are Tour was the third headlining concert tour by English-Irish boy band One Direction, in support of their third studio album, Midnight Memories (2013). It marks the group's first all-stadium tour with an average attendance of 49,848. The tour began on 25 April 2014 in Bogotá, Colombia and concluded on 5 October 2014 in Miami, Florida. Australian pop rock band, 5 Seconds of Summer, served as the opening act for the European and North American dates.

The tour was the highest-grossing tour of 2014 and is the 18th highest-grossing concert tour of all time. It is One Direction's most attended and highest-grossing tour to date, mobilising 3,439,560 fans and $290,178,452 in revenue.

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