List of first overall National Football League draft picks

This is a list of first overall National Football League draft picks. The National Football League draft is an annual sports draft in which NFL teams select newly eligible players for their rosters. To be eligible, a player must be out of high school at least three years. Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams also have the option to trade with another team to move up to a better draft position. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).[1]

From 1947 through 1958 the first selection was awarded by a random draw. The team which received this "bonus" pick forfeited its selection in the final round of the draft. The winner of the "bonus pick" was eliminated from the draw in future years. By 1958 all twelve clubs in the league at the time had received a bonus choice and the system was abolished.[2][3]

Before the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues, along with the subsequent drafting of the same player in each draft. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.[4][5][6]

Through the 2018 NFL draft, 83 players have been selected first overall, with the most recent being Baker Mayfield. The Indianapolis Colts – formerly the Baltimore Colts – have made the most first overall selections in history with seven. Of the first overall draft picks, 43 have been selected to a Pro Bowl and of those 43, twelve have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. While the Heisman Trophy is awarded annually to the most outstanding player in U.S. college football, only 21 of those Heisman winners have been selected first overall in the NFL draft. Only five first overall draft pick players have been selected the NFL Rookie of the Year: Earl Campbell (1978); Billy Sims (1980); George Rogers (1981); Sam Bradford (2010); and Cam Newton (2011).

Key

B Back[A 1] K Kicker NT Nose tackle
C Center LB Linebacker FB Fullback
DB Defensive back P Punter HB Halfback
DE Defensive end QB Quarterback WR Wide receiver
DT Defensive tackle RB Running back G Guard
E End T Offensive tackle TE Tight end
* Selected to a Pro Bowl
Inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame
(all were also selected to a Pro Bowl)

List of first overall picks

Tom Harmon
Tom Harmon was selected with the first overall pick in 1941 by the Chicago Bears.
Billy Cannon at LSU
Billy Cannon was the first pick in the 1960 NFL draft.
O.J. Simpson 1990 · DN-ST-91-03444 crop.JPEG
O. J. Simpson was drafted first overall by Buffalo Bills in 1969.
Uso-show-john-elway-defenselink-mil
John Elway was the first pick in the 1983 NFL draft.
Orlando Pace
Orlando Pace was drafted first overall by the St. Louis Rams in 1997.
Cam Newton - Carolina Panthers
Cam Newton was the first overall pick in the 2011 NFL draft.
Andrew Luck
The Indianapolis Colts chose Andrew Luck with the first overall pick in 2012.
First overall draft picks
Year Name Position College Team Notes
1936 Jay Berwanger[A 2] HB Chicago Philadelphia Eagles Heisman Trophy (1935)
1937 Sam Francis FB Nebraska Philadelphia Eagles
1938 Corbett Davis FB Indiana Cleveland Rams
1939 Ki Aldrich* C TCU Chicago Cardinals NFL All-Star Game (1939, 1942)[7]
1940 George Cafego HB Tennessee Chicago Cardinals
1941 Tom Harmon HB Michigan Chicago Bears Heisman Trophy (1940)
1942 Bill Dudley HB Virginia Pittsburgh Steelers NFL All-Star Game (1950, 1951)[8]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1966)[8]
NFL MVP (1946)[8]
1943 Frank Sinkwich HB Georgia Detroit Lions Heisman Trophy (1942)
1944 Angelo Bertelli QB Notre Dame Boston Yanks Heisman Trophy (1943)
1945 Charley Trippi HB Georgia Chicago Cardinals Pro Bowl (1952, 1953)[9]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1968)[9]
NFL Champion (1947)[10]
1946 Frank Dancewicz QB Notre Dame Boston Yanks
1947 Bob Fenimore HB Oklahoma A&M Chicago Bears
1948 Harry Gilmer* QB Alabama Washington Redskins Pro Bowl (1950, 1952)[11]
1949 Chuck Bednarik C, LB Penn Philadelphia Eagles Pro Bowl (1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1960)[12]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1967)[12]
NFL Champion (1949, 1960)[13][14]
1950 Leon Hart* E Notre Dame Detroit Lions Heisman Trophy (1949)
Pro Bowl (1951)[15]
1951 Kyle Rote* HB SMU New York Giants Pro Bowl (1953, 1954, 1955, 1956)[16]
1952 Bill Wade* QB Vanderbilt Los Angeles Rams Pro Bowl (1958, 1963)[17]
1953 Harry Babcock E Georgia San Francisco 49ers
1954 Bobby Garrett QB Stanford Cleveland Browns
1955 George Shaw QB Oregon Baltimore Colts NFL Champion (1958)[18]
1956 Gary Glick DB Colorado A&M Pittsburgh Steelers
1957 Paul Hornung HB Notre Dame Green Bay Packers Heisman Trophy (1956)
Pro Bowl (1959, 1960)[19]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1986)[19]
NFL Champion (1961, 1962, 1965)[20][21][22]
Super Bowl champion (I)[23]
NFL MVP (1961)[19]
1958 King Hill QB Rice Chicago Cardinals
1959 Randy Duncan QB Iowa Green Bay Packers
1960 Billy Cannon[A 3] RB LSU Los Angeles Rams Heisman Trophy (1959)
1961 Tommy Mason* RB Tulane Minnesota Vikings Pro Bowl (1962, 1963, 1964)[24]
1962 Ernie Davis[A 4] RB Syracuse Washington Redskins Heisman Trophy (1961)
1963 Terry Baker QB Oregon State Los Angeles Rams Heisman Trophy (1962)
1964 Dave Parks* WR Texas Tech San Francisco 49ers Pro Bowl (1964, 1965, 1966)[25]
1965 Tucker Frederickson* RB Auburn New York Giants Pro Bowl (1965)[26]
1966 Tommy Nobis* LB Texas Atlanta Falcons Pro Bowl (1966, 1967, 1968, 1970, 1972)[27]
1967[A 5] Bubba Smith* DE Michigan State Baltimore Colts Pro Bowl (1970, 1971)[28]
Super Bowl champion (V)[29]
1968[A 5] Ron Yary T USC Minnesota Vikings Pro Bowl (1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977)[30]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (2001)[30]
1969[A 5] O. J. Simpson RB USC Buffalo Bills[A 6] Heisman Trophy (1968)
Pro Bowl (1969, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976)[31]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1985)[31]
NFL MVP (1973)[31]
1970 Terry Bradshaw QB Louisiana Tech Pittsburgh Steelers Pro Bowl (1975, 1978, 1979)[32]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1989)[32]
Super Bowl champion (IX, X, XIII, XIV)[33][34][35][36]
Super Bowl MVP (XIII, XIV)[32]
NFL MVP (1978)[32]
1971 Jim Plunkett QB Stanford New England Patriots Heisman Trophy (1970)
Super Bowl champion (XV, XVIII)[37][38]
Super Bowl MVP (XV)[39]
1972 Walt Patulski DE Notre Dame Buffalo Bills
1973 John Matuszak DE Tampa Houston Oilers Super Bowl champion (XI, XV)[37][40]
1974 Ed Jones* DE Tennessee State Dallas Cowboys Pro Bowl (1981, 1982, 1983)[41]
Super Bowl champion (XII)[42]
1975 Steve Bartkowski* QB California Atlanta Falcons Pro Bowl (1980, 1981)[43]
1976 Lee Roy Selmon DE Oklahoma Tampa Bay Buccaneers Pro Bowl (1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984)[44]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1995)[44]
1977 Ricky Bell RB USC Tampa Bay Buccaneers
1978 Earl Campbell RB Texas Houston Oilers Heisman Trophy (1977)
Pro Bowl (1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983)[45]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (1991)[45]
NFL MVP (1979)[45]
Rookie of the Year (1978)
1979 Tom Cousineau[A 7] LB Ohio State Buffalo Bills
1980 Billy Sims* RB Oklahoma Detroit Lions Heisman Trophy (1978)
Pro Bowl (1980, 1981, 1982)[46]
Rookie of the Year (1980)
1981 George Rogers* RB South Carolina New Orleans Saints Heisman Trophy (1980)
Pro Bowl (1981, 1982)[47]
Super Bowl champion (XXII)[48]
Rookie of the Year (1981)
1982 Kenneth Sims DE Texas New England Patriots
1983 John Elway[A 8] QB Stanford Baltimore Colts Pro Bowl (1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998)[49]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (2004)[49]
Super Bowl champion (XXXII, XXXIII)[50][51]
Super Bowl MVP (XXXIII)[49]
NFL MVP (1987)[49]
1984[A 9] Irving Fryar* WR Nebraska New England Patriots Pro Bowl (1985, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997)[52]
1985 Bruce Smith DE Virginia Tech Buffalo Bills Pro Bowl (1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998)[53]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (2009)[53]
1986 Bo Jackson*[A 10] RB Auburn Tampa Bay Buccaneers[A 11] Heisman Trophy (1985)
Pro Bowl (1990)[54]
1987 Vinny Testaverde* QB Miami (FL) Tampa Bay Buccaneers Heisman Trophy (1986)
Pro Bowl (1996, 1998)[55]
1988 Aundray Bruce LB Auburn Atlanta Falcons
1989 Troy Aikman QB UCLA Dallas Cowboys Pro Bowl (1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996)[56]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (2006)[56]
Super Bowl champion (XXVII, XXVIII, XXX)[57][58][59]
Super Bowl MVP (XXVII)[56]
1990 Jeff George QB Illinois Indianapolis Colts[A 12]
1991 Russell Maryland* DT Miami (FL) Dallas Cowboys Pro Bowl (1993)[60]
Super Bowl champion (XXVII, XXVIII, XXX)[57][58][59]
1992 Steve Emtman DE Washington Indianapolis Colts
1993 Drew Bledsoe* QB Washington State New England Patriots Pro Bowl (1994, 1996, 1997, 2002)[61]
Super Bowl champion (XXXVI)[62]
1994 Dan Wilkinson DT Ohio State Cincinnati Bengals
1995 Ki-Jana Carter RB Penn State Cincinnati Bengals
1996 Keyshawn Johnson* WR USC New York Jets Pro Bowl (1998, 1999, 2001)[63]
Super Bowl champion (XXXVII)[64]
1997 Orlando Pace T Ohio State St. Louis Rams Pro Bowl (1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005)[65]
Pro Football Hall of Fame (2016)[65]
Super Bowl champion (XXXIV)[66]
1998 Peyton Manning* QB Tennessee Indianapolis Colts Pro Bowl (1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014)[67]
Super Bowl champion (XLI, 50)[68]
Super Bowl MVP (XLI)[67]
NFL MVP (2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2013)[67]
1999 Tim Couch QB Kentucky Cleveland Browns
2000 Courtney Brown DE Penn State Cleveland Browns
2001 Michael Vick* QB Virginia Tech Atlanta Falcons Pro Bowl (2002, 2004, 2005, 2010)[69]
2002 David Carr QB Fresno State Houston Texans Super Bowl champion (XLVI)
2003 Carson Palmer* QB USC Cincinnati Bengals Heisman Trophy (2002)
Pro Bowl (2005, 2006, 2015)[70]
2004 Eli Manning*[A 13] QB Ole Miss San Diego Chargers Pro Bowl (2008, 2011, 2012, 2015)[71]
Super Bowl champion (XLII, XLVI)[72][73]
Super Bowl MVP (XLII, XLVI)[71]
2005 Alex Smith* QB Utah San Francisco 49ers Pro Bowl (2013, 2016, 2017)
2006 Mario Williams* DE North Carolina State Houston Texans Pro Bowl (2008, 2009, 2013,2014)[74]
2007 JaMarcus Russell QB LSU Oakland Raiders
2008 Jake Long* T Michigan Miami Dolphins Pro Bowl (2008, 2009, 2010, 2011)[75]
2009 Matthew Stafford* QB Georgia Detroit Lions Pro Bowl (2014)
2010 Sam Bradford QB Oklahoma St. Louis Rams Heisman Trophy (2008)
Rookie of the Year (2010)
2011 Cam Newton* QB Auburn Carolina Panthers Heisman Trophy (2010)
Pro Bowl (2011, 2013, 2015)[76]
Rookie of the Year (2011)
NFL MVP (2015)
2012 Andrew Luck* QB Stanford Indianapolis Colts Pro Bowl (2012, 2013, 2014, 2018)[77]
2013 Eric Fisher* T Central Michigan Kansas City Chiefs Pro Bowl (2018)
2014 Jadeveon Clowney* DE South Carolina Houston Texans Pro Bowl (2016, 2017, 2018)
2015 Jameis Winston* QB Florida State Tampa Bay Buccaneers Heisman Trophy (2013)
Pro Bowl (2015)
2016 Jared Goff* QB California Los Angeles Rams Pro Bowl (2017, 2018)
2017 Myles Garrett* DE Texas A&M Cleveland Browns Pro Bowl (2018)
2018 Baker Mayfield QB Oklahoma Cleveland Browns Heisman Trophy (2017)
2019 Arizona Cardinals

Statistics

  • The following teams have never had the first overall pick
    • Denver Broncos
    • Jacksonville Jaguars
    • Baltimore Ravens
    • Seattle Seahawks
  • Eight teams have made the playoffs in the same season in which they made the first overall selection in the draft. They were the 1968 Minnesota Vikings, 1978 Houston Oilers, 1982 New England Patriots, 1991 Dallas Cowboys, 2004 San Diego Chargers, 2008 Miami Dolphins, 2012 Indianapolis Colts, and 2013 Kansas City Chiefs.
  • No team has ever gone from the first overall pick to a Super Bowl win in the same season. The Minnesota Vikings lost Super Bowl IV the year after they had the first overall pick.

First overall draft picks per team

The Indianapolis Colts and the Los Angeles Rams have each held the first overall pick a total of seven times, the most of any NFL team. This includes the Colts' time in Baltimore and the Rams' time in Cleveland and St. Louis. Only four teams in the league have never held the first overall pick in the NFL draft: the Denver Broncos, the Jacksonville Jaguars, the Seattle Seahawks and the Baltimore Ravens. The Boston Yanks are the only defunct franchise to have held a first overall pick.[78]

Team Total
number
Year(s) Notes Ref
Indianapolis Colts 7 1955, 1967, 1983, 1990
1992, 1998, 2012
  • 3 as the Baltimore Colts
  • 4 as the Indianapolis Colts
[79]
Los Angeles Rams 7 1938, 1952, 1960
1963, 1997, 2010, 2016
  • 1 as the Cleveland Rams
  • 2 as the St. Louis Rams
  • 4 as the Los Angeles Rams
[80]
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 5 1976, 1977, 1986, 1987, 2015 [81]
Cleveland Browns 5 1954, 1999, 2000, 2017, 2018 [82]
Arizona Cardinals 5 1939, 1940, 1945, 1958, 2019
  • 4 as the Chicago Cardinals
[83]
Detroit Lions 4 1943, 1950, 1980, 2009 [84]
Atlanta Falcons 4 1966, 1975, 1988, 2001 [85]
Buffalo Bills 4 1969, 1972, 1979, 1985 [86]
New England Patriots 4 1971, 1982, 1984, 1993
  • Also had first selection in the 1964 AFL Draft
    (as the Boston Patriots)
[87]
Philadelphia Eagles 3 1936, 1937, 1949 [88]
Pittsburgh Steelers 3 1942, 1956, 1970 [89]
San Francisco 49ers 3 1953, 1964, 2005 [90]
Dallas Cowboys 3 1974, 1989, 1991 [91]
Cincinnati Bengals 3 1994, 1995, 2003 [92]
Houston Texans 3 2002, 2006, 2014 [93]
Chicago Bears 2 1941, 1947 [94]
Boston Yanks 2 1944, 1946 [78]
Washington Redskins 2 1948, 1962 [95]
New York Giants 2 1951, 1965 [96]
Green Bay Packers 2 1957, 1959 [97]
Minnesota Vikings 2 1961, 1968 [98]
Tennessee Titans 2 1973, 1978
  • 2 as the Houston Oilers
[99]
New Orleans Saints 1 1981 [100]
New York Jets 1 1996 [101]
San Diego Chargers 1 2004 [102]
Oakland Raiders 1 2007 [103]
Miami Dolphins 1 2008 [104]
Carolina Panthers 1 2011 [105]
Kansas City Chiefs 1 2013 [106]

First overall draft picks by school

School Total
number
Year(s)
Notre Dame 5 1944, 1946, 1950, 1957, 1972
USC 5 1968, 1969, 1977, 1996, 2003
Oklahoma 4 1976, 1980, 2010, 2018
Georgia 4 1943, 1945, 1953, 2009
Auburn 4 1965, 1986, 1988, 2011
Stanford 4 1954, 1971, 1983, 2012
Texas 3 1966, 1978, 1982
Ohio State 3 1979, 1994, 1997
Nebraska 2 1937, 1984
Miami (FL) 2 1987, 1991
Tennessee 2 1940, 1998
Penn State 2 1995, 2000
Virginia Tech 2 1985, 2001
LSU 2 1960, 2007
Michigan 2 1941, 2008
South Carolina 2 1981, 2014
California 2 1975, 2016
Chicago 1 1936
Indiana 1 1938
TCU 1 1939
Virginia 1 1942
Oklahoma State 1 1947
Alabama 1 1948
Penn 1 1949
SMU 1 1951
Vanderbilt 1 1952
Oregon 1 1955
Colorado State 1 1956
Rice 1 1958
Iowa 1 1959
Tulane 1 1961
Syracuse 1 1962
Oregon State 1 1963
Texas Tech 1 1964
Michigan State 1 1967
Louisiana Tech 1 1970
Tampa 1 1973
Tennessee State 1 1974
UCLA 1 1989
Illinois 1 1990
Washington 1 1992
Washington State 1 1993
Kentucky 1 1999
Fresno State 1 2002
Ole Miss 1 2004
Utah 1 2005
North Carolina State 1 2006
Central Michigan 1 2013
Florida State 1 2015
Texas A&M 1 2017

First overall draft picks by position

First overall selections by position played[2]:525
Position Number of selections Last year selected
Quarterbacks
31
2018
Running backs
23
1995
Defensive linemen
15
2017
Offensive linemen
7
2013
Wide receivers
3
1996
Linebackers
3
1988
Defensive backs
1
1956

Notes

  1. ^ In American and Canadian football, a back is a player who is lined up behind the linemen, the players who line up closest to the line of scrimmage.
  2. ^ Jay Berwanger did not sign with the Philadelphia Eagles. The Eagles traded his rights to the Chicago Bears; he did not sign with them either.
  3. ^ Billy Cannon signed with the AFL team Houston Oilers rather than the Los Angeles Rams.
  4. ^ Ernie Davis was subsequently traded to the Cleveland Browns after being drafted by the Washington Redskins.
  5. ^ a b c Because of the NFL–AFL merger agreement, the history of the AFL is officially recognized by the NFL and therefore this list includes the Common Draft for the years 1967, 1968, and 1969.
  6. ^ The Buffalo Bills were a part of the AFL when they selected Simpson with the first overall pick in the 1969 draft. The Bills joined the NFL the next year, in 1970.
  7. ^ Tom Cousineau chose to sign with the CFL team Montreal Alouettes over the Buffalo Bills.
  8. ^ John Elway was subsequently traded to the Denver Broncos after being drafted by the Baltimore Colts.
  9. ^ College seniors who had already signed with the USFL or CFL were not eligible for the regular draft. Instead the NFL held a three round special draft on June 5, 1984. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected Steve Young first overall in that draft.
  10. ^ Bo Jackson did not sign with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and chose to enter the 1987 NFL draft the following year.
  11. ^ The Cleveland Browns – via the Buffalo Bills originally – possessed the number one overall pick but because they selected Bernie Kosar in the 1985 Supplemental Draft, the pick was subsequently given to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
  12. ^ The Dallas Cowboys originally possessed the number one overall pick but because they selected Steve Walsh in the 1989 Supplemental Draft, the pick was given to the Indianapolis Colts who originally held the second overall pick.
  13. ^ Eli Manning was subsequently traded to the New York Giants after being drafted by the San Diego Chargers.

References

General

  • "Heisman Winners". Heisman Trophy. All Things Media LLC. Archived from the original on August 1, 2014. Retrieved May 12, 2013.
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  • "Super Bowl History". National Football League. NFL Enterprises LLC. Retrieved January 6, 2009.
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Specific

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  40. ^ "1986 Oakland Raiders". Sports Reference LLC. Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 9, 2012.
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  50. ^ "1997 Denver Broncos". Sports Reference LLC. Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 9, 2012.
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See also

1938 NFL Draft

The 1938 National Football League Draft was held on December 12, 1937, at the Hotel Sherman in Chicago, Illinois. The draft consisted of 12 rounds and 110 player selections. It began with the Cleveland Rams, taking Corbett Davis.

1939 NFL Draft

The 1939 National Football League Draft was held on December 9, 1938, at the New Yorker Hotel in New York City, New York.

2009 NFL Draft

The 2009 NFL Draft was the seventy-fourth annual meeting of National Football League (NFL) franchises to select newly eligible football players. The draft took place at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, New York, on April 25 and 26, 2009. The draft consisted of two rounds on the first day starting at 4:00 pm EDT, and five rounds on the second day starting at 10:00 am EDT. To compensate for the time change from the previous year and in an effort to help shorten the draft, teams were no longer on the clock for 15 minutes in the first round and 10 minutes in the second round. Each team now had 10 minutes to make their selection in the first round and seven minutes in the second round. Rounds three through seven were shortened to five minutes per team. This was the first year that the NFL used this format and it was changed again the following year for the 2010 NFL Draft. The 2009 NFL Draft was televised by both NFL Network and ESPN and was the first to have cheerleaders. The Detroit Lions, who became the first team in NFL history to finish a season at 0–16, used the first selection in the draft to select University of Georgia quarterback Matthew Stafford.It was the first draft since 1983 that saw two centers being selected in the first round—Alex Mack at No. 21 to the Browns, and Eric Wood at No. 28 to the Bills. It was also the first time since the 1993 draft that a player from the University of Miami (FL) was not selected in the first round. As of the end of the 2016 season, the 2009 Draft has seen 11 of the 32 first-round selections make the Pro Bowl, and 26 (including three punters) in total for the entire class. It has been referred to as one of the worst drafts in league history.

2010 NFL Draft

The 2010 NFL Draft was the 75th annual meeting of National Football League (NFL) franchises to select newly eligible football players. The 2010 draft took place over three days, at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, New York, with the first round on Thursday, April 22, 2010, at 7:30 pm EDT. The second and third rounds took place on Friday, April 23 starting at 6:00 pm EDT, while the final four rounds were held on Saturday, April 24, starting at 10:00 am EDT. Television coverage was provided by both NFL Network and ESPN.

The St. Louis Rams, as the team with the worst record during the 2009 season, selected quarterback Sam Bradford with the first pick. Three of the top four picks were members of the Oklahoma Sooners football team, and five of the top six were from the Big 12 Conference. The prime time broadcast of the first round was watched by 7.29 million viewers making it the most viewed first round ever and making ESPN the second most watched network of the night.

Andrew Luck

Andrew Austen Luck (born September 12, 1989) is an American football quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Stanford, where he won the Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Award as college football's player of the year and was twice recognized as an All-American. He was the runner-up for the Heisman Trophy in both 2010 and 2011. He was named the Offensive Player of the Year in the Pac-12 Conference in both 2010 and 2011. CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang called Luck the best prospect he had ever scouted, while the Kansas City Star put him in line with LeBron James and Bryce Harper as "the most hyped amateurs in recent sports memory."Although widely projected as the first overall selection in the 2011 NFL Draft, Luck decided to return to Stanford for his redshirt junior season. A year later, he was selected first overall in the 2012 NFL Draft. In his first three professional seasons, Luck led the Colts to three playoff appearances including two AFC South division titles in 2013 and 2014, also earning a Pro Bowl selection in each season. In the 2013–14 NFL playoffs, he led the Colts to the second largest playoff comeback in NFL history. During the 2016 season, Luck suffered an injury to his throwing shoulder but continued to play. That offseason he got surgery on the shoulder, forcing him to miss the entire 2017 season. The next year he returned to playing, finishing second in the league in touchdown passes and setting career-highs in several categories, as well as leading the Colts to 10 wins and their first playoff appearance since 2014. For his play he was voted to the fourth Pro Bowl of his career and was named the Comeback Player of the Year. Primarily known for his passing, Luck has also established himself as a mobile threat.

Billy Cannon

William Abb Cannon (August 2, 1937 – May 20, 2018) was an American football running back and tight end who played professionally in the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL). He attended Louisiana State University (LSU), where he played college football as a halfback, return specialist, and defensive back for the LSU Tigers. At LSU, Cannon was twice unanimously named an All-American, helped the 1958 LSU team win a national championship, and received the Heisman Trophy as the nation's most outstanding college player in 1959. His punt return against Ole Miss on Halloween night in 1959 is considered by fans and sportswriters to be one of the most famous plays in LSU sports history.

Cannon was selected as the first overall pick in the 1960 NFL Draft and as a first-round territorial pick in the 1960 American Football League draft, resulting in a contract dispute that ended in court. Cannon played in the AFL for the Houston Oilers and Oakland Raiders before ending his football career with the Kansas City Chiefs of the NFL. He began his professional career as a halfback for the Oilers. A two-time AFL All-Star, Cannon led the league in rushing and all-purpose yards in 1961. He was named the most valuable player of the first two AFL championship games, which were won by the Oilers. He was moved to fullback and later tight end after being traded to the Raiders, with whom he won another league championship in 1967. That season, he played in the second AFL–NFL World Championship game, retroactively known as Super Bowl II, in which his team was defeated by the Green Bay Packers.

Cannon became a dentist after retiring from football. In 1983, after a series of bad real estate investments, he became involved in a counterfeiting scheme and served two and a half years in prison. In 1995, he was hired as a dentist at Louisiana State Penitentiary, a position he held until his death in 2018. His jersey number 20 was retired by LSU football in 1960, and he was inducted into the LSU Athletic Hall of Fame in 1975, the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 1976, and the College Football Hall of Fame in 2008.

Billy Sims

Billy Ray Sims (born September 18, 1955) is a former American college and professional football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for five seasons during the 1980s. Sims played college football for the University of Oklahoma, where he was a two-time consensus All-American, and won the Heisman Trophy in 1978. He was the first overall pick in the 1980 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the NFL's Detroit Lions. Sims was the last Oklahoma player taken Number 1 overall in the NFL Draft until quarterback Sam Bradford was taken first in the 2010 NFL Draft. He was given the nickname "Kung Fu Billy Sims" by ESPN's Chris Berman, after a game where the Detroit Lions played the Houston Oilers. In the NFL Films highlight, rather than be tackled during a rushing attempt, Sims ran at, jumped, and, while fully airborne, kicked Oilers Cornerback Steve Brown in the head.

Cam Newton

Cameron Jerrell Newton (born May 11, 1989) is an American football quarterback for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Auburn and was drafted as the first overall pick by the Panthers in the 2011 NFL Draft. Newton is the only player in the modern era to be awarded the Heisman Trophy, win a national championship, and become the first overall pick in an NFL draft within a one-year span. He was the 2011 NFL Rookie of the Year, is a three-time Pro Bowler, and was named the NFL MVP in 2015.

In his rookie year, Newton broke all-time NFL rookie records for passing and rushing yards. He became the first NFL quarterback to throw for 400 yards in his first game, shattering Peyton Manning's first-game record by 120 yards. He also broke Otto Graham's 61-year-old record for passing yards by any quarterback in an NFL debut. Newton went on to become the first rookie quarterback to throw for 4,000 yards in a season. He also ran for 14 touchdowns, more in a single season than any quarterback in NFL history, breaking Steve Grogan's 35-year-old record.In 2015, Newton became the first quarterback in NFL history to throw for at least 30 touchdowns and rush for 10 in the same season (35 passing, 10 rushing). He also became the only quarterback ever to have 300 yards passing, 5 touchdown passes, and over 100 yards rushing in the same game. Newton capped off the 2015 season by capturing MVP honors and leading the Panthers to a 15–1 record and a trip to Super Bowl 50.

Earl Campbell

Earl Christian Campbell (born March 29, 1955) is a former American football running back who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the Houston Oilers and New Orleans Saints. Known for his aggressive, punishing running style and ability to break tackles, Campbell gained recognition as one of the best power running backs in NFL history.

He played college football for the University of Texas, where he won the Heisman Trophy and earned unanimous All-America honors in his senior season, as well as numerous other accolades. He was drafted first overall by the Oilers in 1978 and had an immediate impact in the league, earning NFL Rookie of the Year honors. Earl Campbell was named the NFL's Offensive Player of the Year in each of his first three seasons, during which he averaged nearly 1,700 rushing yards per season. He won the AP NFL Most Valuable Player Award in 1979 after leading the league in rushing yards and touchdowns.

With head coach Bum Phillips, Campbell's emergence in Houston coincided with the Luv Ya Blue era, a period of sustained success in which the Oilers made three straight playoff appearances. Campbell became the centerpiece of Houston's offense during the late 1970s and early 1980s. He was traded to the Saints six games into the 1984 season, where he spent his final season and a half before retiring. Campbell was inducted into both the College Football Hall of Fame (1990) and Pro Football Hall of Fame (1991). His jersey number is retired by the University of Texas and the Tennessee Titans.

Eli Manning

Elisha Nelson Manning IV

(born January 3, 1981) is an American football quarterback for the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Mississippi from 2000 to 2003. He was drafted as the first overall pick in the 2004 NFL Draft by the San Diego Chargers and was immediately traded to the Giants who in return gave up a package, highlighted by fourth overall selection Philip Rivers. Manning is the son of former NFL quarterback Archie Manning and the younger brother of former NFL quarterback Peyton Manning.

Manning holds Giants franchise records for most passing yards, touchdown passes, and completed passes in a career. In 2012, in a 41–34 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, he threw for 510 yards, 3 yards short of Phil Simms' record of 513. He led the Giants to victory in Super Bowls XLII and XLVI, defeating the New England Patriots in both games. Manning was named Most Valuable Player in both Super Bowls, becoming one of five players to have multiple Super Bowl MVP awards (Bart Starr and Terry Bradshaw also have two, Joe Montana three and Tom Brady four).

Manning started 210 straight games from 2004 to 2017, the second-longest consecutive starts streak by a quarterback in NFL history. He is the seventh all-time leader in passing yards and touchdowns. Though lacking his brother's regular-season consistency and high-caliber performances, Manning is known for his two improbable Super Bowl-winning postseason runs in 2007 and 2011, in which he led an underdog Giants squad to Super Bowl victories twice against the Patriots.

Jared Goff

Jared Thomas Goff (born October 14, 1994) is an American football quarterback for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at California and was a first-team All-Pac-12 quarterback in 2015. He was selected by the Rams with the first overall pick of the 2016 NFL Draft. He started his rookie season as the backup to Case Keenum, eventually taking over as the starter during the later half of the season. In 2018, Goff helped lead the Rams to a 13–3 record and a trip to Super Bowl LIII, where they lost to the New England Patriots by a score of 13–3. This was the franchise's first Super Bowl appearance since the 2001 season, which was also played against and won by the New England Patriots. He has been selected to two Pro Bowls.

Mr. Irrelevant

Mr. Irrelevant is the title bestowed each year upon the last pick of the annual National Football League draft. Although the NFL Draft dates back to 1936, the first person to officially be given the "Mr. Irrelevant" title was Kelvin Kirk, pick number 487 of the 1976 draft. The current Mr. Irrelevant is Trey Quinn, former wide receiver for the SMU Mustangs football team, who was picked 256th by the Washington Redskins in the 2018 draft.

Peyton Manning

Peyton Williams Manning (born March 24, 1976) is a former American football quarterback who played 18 seasons in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the Indianapolis Colts. Considered to be one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time due to his numerous career achievements, he spent 14 seasons with the Colts and was a member of the Denver Broncos in his last four seasons. Manning played college football for the University of Tennessee, leading the Tennessee Volunteers to the 1997 SEC Championship in his senior season. He is the second son of former NFL quarterback Archie Manning and older brother of New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning.

Manning was selected by the Colts as the first overall pick in the 1998 NFL Draft. From 1998 to 2010, he improved the fortunes of the struggling Colts franchise and helped transform them into consistent playoff contenders. During his tenure as starting quarterback, Manning led the team to eight division championships, two AFC championships, and one Super Bowl title, the franchise's first in over three decades, as well as their first since relocating to Indianapolis.

After undergoing neck surgery that forced him to miss the entire 2011 season, Manning was released by the Colts and signed with the Broncos. Serving as the team's starting quarterback from 2012 to 2015, he contributed to the Broncos reaching the top of their division each year and his playing career concluded with a victory in Super Bowl 50.

Manning holds many NFL records, including touchdown passes (539), AP MVP awards (5), Pro Bowl appearances (14), 4,000-yard passing seasons (14), single-season passing yards (5,477 in 2013), single-season passing touchdowns (55 in 2013), tied for most First-Team All Pros for a quarterback with 7, and is second in career passing yards (71,940). A two-time Super Bowl winner and the most valuable player of Super Bowl XLI, Manning is also the only quarterback to start the Super Bowl for two franchises more than once each, with different coaches at each Super Bowl start (Dungy, Caldwell, Fox, Kubiak), and the only starting quarterback to win a Super Bowl with two franchises. At 39 years of age, Manning was the oldest quarterback to start in and win a Super Bowl until Tom Brady surpassed him by winning a Super Bowl at 41.During a 2009 Monday Night Football game, Manning received the nickname "The Sheriff" from color commentator Jon Gruden due to his tendency to audible prior to the snap, and he was one of the most recognizable and parodied players in the NFL. Teams led by Manning typically utilized the hurry-up offense in place of the standard huddle.

Early era (1936–1959)
AFL and NFL era (1960–1966)
Common draft (1967–1969)
Modern era (1970–present)
Expansion drafts
Others
See also

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