List of films with live action and animation

This is a list of films with live action and animation, films that combine live action and animated elements, typically interacting.

By decade

1900s

1910s

  • 1914 – Gertie the Dinosaur
  • 1917 – När Kapten Grogg skulle porträtteras[1] ("When Captain Grogg was to be painted")
  • 1918 – Out of the Inkwell (animated characters in live action surroundings: series between 1918 and 1929)

1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

2020s

See also

References

  1. ^ "Victor Bergdahl – När Kapten Grogg skulle porträtteras (1917)". YouTube. 2008-12-07. Retrieved 2013-07-05.
  2. ^ "Cici Can – Türk Filmi". YouTube. 2013-10-31. Retrieved 2014-07-01.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Gibron, Bill (2014-12-02). "The 10 Best Films That Combine Live Action With Animation". PopMatters. Retrieved 2015-11-15.
  4. ^ a b c d e Gleiberman, Owen; Schwarzbaum, Lisa (2013-07-31). "5 Best – and 5 Worst – Live-Action/Animation Hybrid Movies". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2015-11-15.
  5. ^ https://film.avclub.com/cartoon-break-20-live-action-movies-with-one-animated-1798229418

External links

Fun and Fancy Free

Fun and Fancy Free is a 1947 American animated musical fantasy package film produced by Walt Disney and released on September 27, 1947 by RKO Radio Pictures. It is the ninth Disney animated feature film and the fourth of the package films the studio produced in the 1940s in order to save money during World War II. The Disney package films of the late 1940s helped finance Cinderella, and subsequent others, such as Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan.

The film is a compilation of two stories, the first of which, Bongo, is hosted by Jiminy Cricket and narrated by Dinah Shore. Based on the tale Little Bear Bongo by Sinclair Lewis, Bongo tells the story of a circus bear cub named Bongo who longs for freedom from captivity. Bongo escapes the circus and eventually forms a romantic relationship with a female bear cub named Lulubelle in the wild, realizing that he must prove himself in order to earn Lulubelle as his mate. The second story, Mickey and the Beanstalk, is hosted by Edgar Bergen and is a retelling of Jack and the Beanstalk featuring Mickey, Donald, and Goofy as three peasants who discover the temperamental Willie the Giant's castle in the sky through the use of some magic beans. They must battle the greedy but lovable giant in order to restore peace to their valley. Though the film is primarily animated, it also uses live-action segments to join its two stories together. Mickey and the Beanstalk was the last time Walt Disney voiced Mickey Mouse, because he was too busy on other projects to continue voicing the famous character. Disney replaced himself with sound effects artist Jimmy MacDonald.

Live-action animated film

A live-action animated film is one that combines live action filmmaking with animation.Films that are both live action and computer animated tend to have fictional characters or figures represented and characterized by cast members through motion capture, and then animated and modeled by animators, while films that are live action and traditionally animated use hand-drawn or stop-motion animation.

Saludos Amigos

Saludos Amigos (Spanish for "Greetings, Friends") is a 1942 American live-action animated package film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. It is the sixth Disney animated feature film and the first of the six package films produced by Walt Disney Productions in the 1940s. Set in Latin America, it is made up of four different segments; Donald Duck stars in two of them and Goofy stars in one. It also features the first appearance of José Carioca, the Brazilian cigar-smoking parrot. Saludos Amigos premiered in Rio de Janeiro on August 24, 1942. It was released in the United States on February 6, 1943. Saludos Amigos was popular enough that Walt Disney decided to make another film about Latin America, The Three Caballeros, to be produced two years later. At 42 minutes, it is Disney's shortest animated feature to date.

So Dear to My Heart

So Dear to My Heart is a 1948 feature film produced by Walt Disney, whose world premiere was in Chicago, Illinois on November 29, 1948, released by RKO Radio Pictures. Like 1946's Song of the South, the film combines animation and live action. It is based on the 1943 Sterling North book Midnight and Jeremiah which was revised by North to parallel the film's storyline amendments and then re-issued under the title So Dear to My Heart.

It was the final film appearance of Harry Carey.

The Reluctant Dragon (1941 film)

The Reluctant Dragon is a 1941 American film produced by Walt Disney, directed by Alfred Werker, and released by RKO Radio Pictures on June 20, 1941. Essentially a tour of the then-new Walt Disney Studios facility in Burbank, California, the film stars radio comedian Robert Benchley and many Disney staffers such as Ward Kimball, Fred Moore, Norman Ferguson, Clarence Nash, and Walt Disney, all as themselves.

The first twenty minutes of the film are in black-and-white, and the remainder is in Technicolor. Most of the film is live-action, with four short animated segments inserted into the running time: a black-and-white segment featuring Casey Junior from Dumbo; and three Technicolor cartoons: Baby Weems, Goofy's How to Ride a Horse, and the extended-length short The Reluctant Dragon, based upon Kenneth Grahame's book of the same name. The total length of all animated parts is 40 minutes.

The Three Caballeros

The Three Caballeros is a 1944 American live-action animated musical package film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. The film premiered in Mexico City on December 21, 1944. It was released in the United States on February 3, 1945 and in the UK that March. The seventh Disney animated feature film, the film plots an adventure through parts of Latin America, combining live-action and animation. This is the second of the six package films released by Walt Disney Productions in the 1940s, following Saludos Amigos (1942). It was also the first feature-length film to incorporate traditional animation with real life, live-action actors.

The film is plotted as a series of self-contained segments, strung together by the device of Donald Duck opening birthday gifts from his Latin American friends. Several Latin American stars of the period appear, including singers Aurora Miranda (sister of Carmen Miranda) and Dora Luz, as well as singer and dancer Carmen Molina.

The film was produced as part of the studio's good will message for South America. The film stars Donald Duck, who in the course of the film is joined by old friend José Carioca, the cigar-smoking parrot from Saludos Amigos, who represents Brazil, and later becomes friends with a pistol-packing rooster named Panchito Pistoles, who represents Mexico.

Animation topics
By country
Industry
Works
Techniques
Variants
Related topics
By style
By theme
By movement
or period
By demographic groups
By format,
technique,
approach,
or production

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.