List of earthquakes in the United States

The following is a list of notable earthquakes and/or tsunamis which had their epicenter in areas that are now part of the United States with the latter affecting areas of the United States. Those in italics were not part of the United States when the event occurred.

Date State(s) Magnitude Fatalities Article Further information
January 26, 1700 Washington, Oregon, California 8.7–9.2 Unknown 1700 Cascadia earthquake
November 18, 1755 Massachusetts 5.9 Unknown 1755 Cape Ann earthquake
December 16, 1811 Missouri 7.2–8.1 Unknown 1811–1812 New Madrid earthquakes
December 8, 1812 California 6.9–7.5 40+ 1812 San Juan Capistrano earthquake
January 9, 1857 California 7.9 2 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake
April 24, 1867 Kansas 5.1 0 1867 Manhattan, Kansas earthquake
April 2, 1868 Hawaii 7.9 77 1868 Hawaii earthquake and tsunami
October 21, 1868 California 6.3–6.7 30 1868 Hayward earthquake
December 14, 1872 Washington 6.5–7.0 0 1872 North Cascades earthquake
March 26, 1872 California 7.4–7.9 27 1872 Lone Pine earthquake
August 31, 1886 South Carolina 6.9–7.3 60 1886 Charleston earthquake
April 18, 1906 California 7.9 3,000+ 1906 San Francisco earthquake
September 27, 1909 Indiana 5.1 0 1909 Wabash River earthquake
October 3, 1915 Nevada 7.1 0 1915 Pleasant Valley earthquake
June 29, 1925 California 6.8 13 1925 Santa Barbara earthquake
August 16, 1931 Texas 5.8 0 1931 Valentine earthquake
March 10, 1933 California 6.4 120 1933 Long Beach earthquake
October 18, 1935 Montana 6.2 4 1935 Helena earthquake
July 15, 1936 Oregon, Washington 5.8 0 1936 State Line earthquake
May 18, 1940 California 6.9 9 1940 El Centro earthquake
December 20, 1940 New Hampshire 5.3 0 1940 New Hampshire earthquakes
December 24, 1940 New Hampshire 5.5 0 1940 New Hampshire earthquakes
April 1, 1946 Alaska 8.6 165 1946 Aleutian Islands earthquake and tsunami
December 4, 1948 California 6.3 0 1948 Desert Hot Springs earthquake
April 13, 1949 Washington 6.7 8 1949 Olympia earthquake
July 21, 1952 California 7.3 14 1952 Kern County earthquake
March 9, 1957 Alaska 8.6 0 1957 Andreanof Islands earthquake and tsunami
July 9, 1958 Alaska 7.8 5 (tsunami) 1958 Lituya Bay earthquakes and megatsunami
August 17, 1959 Montana, Wyoming, Idaho 7.3–7.5 28+ 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake
March 27, 1964 Alaska 9.2 143 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami
February 4, 1965 Alaska 8.7 0 1965 Rat Islands earthquake and tsunami
April 29, 1965 Washington 6.7 7 1965 Puget Sound earthquake
August 9, 1967 Colorado 5.3 0 Rocky Mountain Arsenal#Deep injection well
November 26, 1967 Colorado 5.2 0 Rocky Mountain Arsenal#Deep injection well
November 9, 1968 Illinois 5.4 0 1968 Illinois earthquake
October 2, 1969 California 5.6, 5.7 1 1969 Santa Rosa earthquakes Doublet
February 9, 1971 California 6.5–6.7 58–65 1971 San Fernando earthquake
February 2, 1975 Alaska 7.6 0 1975 Near Islands earthquake
November 29, 1975 Hawaii 7.2 2 1975 Hawaii earthquake
May 2, 1983 California 6.5 0 1983 Coalinga earthquake
October 28, 1983 Idaho 7.3 2 1983 Borah Peak earthquake
April 24, 1984 California 6.2 0 1984 Morgan Hill earthquake
October 1, 1987 California 5.9 8 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake
October 17, 1989 California 6.9 63 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake
June 28, 1991 California 5.6 2 1991 Sierra Madre earthquake
April 25–26, 1992 California 6.5–7.2 0 1992 Cape Mendocino earthquakes
June 28, 1992 California 7.3 3 1992 Landers earthquake
June 28, 1992 California 6.5 0 1992 Big Bear earthquake
March 25, 1993 Oregon 5.6 0 1993 Scotts Mills earthquake
September 20, 1993 Oregon 6.0 2 1993 Klamath Falls earthquakes
January 17, 1994 California 6.7 57 1994 Northridge earthquake
April 14, 1995 Texas 5.7 0 1995 Marathon earthquake
May 2, 1996 Washington 5.6 0 1996 Duvall earthquake
September 25, 1998 Pennsylvania 5.2 0 1998 Pymatuning earthquake
October 16, 1999 California 7.1 0 1999 Hector Mine earthquake
February 28, 2001 Washington 6.8 1 2001 Nisqually earthquake
November 3, 2002 Alaska 7.9 0 2002 Denali earthquake
December 22, 2003 California 6.5 2 2003 San Simeon earthquake
September 10, 2006 Florida 5.8 0 2006 Gulf of Mexico earthquake
October 15, 2006 Hawaii 6.7 0 2006 Kiholo Bay earthquake
October 30, 2007 California 5.6 0 2007 Alum Rock earthquake
February 21, 2008 Nevada 6.0 0 2008 Wells earthquake
April 18, 2008 Illinois 5.4 0 2008 Illinois earthquake
July 29, 2008 California 5.5 0 2008 Chino Hills earthquake
January 9, 2010 California 6.5 0 2010 Eureka earthquake
July 7, 2010 California 5.4 0 2010 Borrego Springs earthquake
August 22, 2011 Colorado 5.3 0 2011 Colorado earthquake
August 23, 2011 Virginia 5.9 0 2011 Virginia earthquake
November 5, 2011 Oklahoma 5.6 0 2011 Oklahoma earthquake
June 23, 2014 Alaska 7.9 0 2014 Aleutian Islands earthquake
July 25, 2014 Alaska 5.9 0 2014 Southeast Alaska earthquake
August 24, 2014 California 6.0 1 2014 South Napa earthquake
September 25, 2014 Alaska 6.2 0 2014 Southern Alaska earthquake
January 24, 2016 Alaska 7.1 0 2016 Old Iliamna earthquake
September 3, 2016 Oklahoma 5.8 0 2016 Oklahoma earthquake
January 23, 2018 Alaska 7.9 0 2018 Gulf of Alaska earthquake
November 30, 2018 Alaska 7.0 0 2018 Anchorage earthquake
2014 pga2pct50yrs (vector)
Two-percent probability of exceedance in 50 years map of peak ground acceleration from the United States Geological Survey, released July 17, 2014

Earthquake swarms which affected the United States:

Earthquakes which affected the United States but whose epicenters were outside the United States borders:

Earthquakes which did not affect the United States directly, but caused tsunamis which did:

See also

References

  1. ^ Healy, J.H.; Rubey, W.W.; Griggs, D.T.; Raleigh, C.B. (27 September 1968). "The Denver Earthquakes: disposal of waste fluids by injection into a deep well has triggered earthquakes near Denver, Colorado" (PDF). Science. 161 (3848): 1301–1310. doi:10.1126/science.161.3848.1301. PMID 17831340. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  2. ^ Gibbons, Helen (November 2009). "USGS Scientists Respond to Deadly Samoa Tsunami". United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 5 May 2015.

External links

1868 Hayward earthquake

The 1868 Hayward earthquake occurred in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, United States on October 21. With an estimated moment magnitude of 6.3–6.7 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of IX (Violent), it was the most recent large earthquake to occur on the Hayward Fault Zone. It caused significant damage and a number of deaths throughout the region, and was known as the "Great San Francisco earthquake" prior to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.

1906 Aleutian Islands earthquake

The 1906 Aleutian Islands earthquake occurred at 00:11 UTC on August 17. It had an estimated seismic moment of 3.8 x 1028 dyn cm−1, equivalent to a magnitude of 8.35 on the moment magnitude scale. This earthquake was followed thirty minutes later by the 1906 Valparaíso earthquake in Chile, but the two events are not thought to be linked. Due to the remote location, there are no reports of damage associated with this earthquake. A transpacific tsunami reported from Japan and Hawaii was triggered by the Chilean event, rather than the Aleutian Islands earthquake.

1909 Wabash River earthquake

The 1909 Wabash River earthquake occurred at 04:45 local time on September 27 with a maximum Mercalli intensity of VII (Very strong). It measured 5.1 on a seismic scale that is based on an isoseismal map or the event's felt area. With moderate damage in the Wabash River Valley, it is currently the strongest earthquake recorded in the U.S. state of Indiana. The earthquake occurred somewhere along a fault within the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone.

1915 Pleasant Valley earthquake

The 1915 Pleasant Valley earthquake occurred at 22:53:21 on October 2 in north-central Nevada. With a moment magnitude of 6.8 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of X (Extreme), it was the strongest earthquake ever recorded in the state.

1918 San Jacinto earthquake

The 1918 San Jacinto earthquake occurred in extreme eastern San Diego County in Southern California on April 21 at 14:32:29 local time. The shock had a moment magnitude of 6.7 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of IX (Violent). Several injuries and one death occurred with total losses estimated to be $200,000.

1931 Valentine earthquake

The 1931 Valentine earthquake occurred on August 16 of that year with a moment magnitude of 6.5 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe). Though no casualties were reported, the quake caused damage to many homes and buildings in the town of Valentine. It remains the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in Texas history.

1932 Eureka earthquake

The 1932 Eureka earthquake occurred on June 6 at 00:44:26 local time along the northern coastal area of California in the United States. With a moment magnitude of 6.4 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe), this earthquake left one person dead from a falling chimney and several injured. The shock was the largest in the area since 1923 and was felt in southern Oregon and northern California.

1947 Wisconsin earthquake

The 1947 Wisconsin earthquake took place on May 6, immediately south of Milwaukee at 15:25 (CST). It was the largest tremor to be historically documented in Wisconsin, but it was not recorded by seismographs.

1949 Olympia earthquake

The 1949 Olympia earthquake occurred on April 13 at 11:55:44 local time with a moment magnitude of 6.7 and a maximum Mercalli Intensity of VIII (Severe). The shock was located in the area between Olympia and Tacoma, and was felt throughout the state, as well as parts of Oregon, British Columbia, Idaho, and Montana. It is the largest recorded earthquake to occur in the Puget Sound region of Washington. Eight people were killed, a minimum of 64 people were injured, and the total damage is estimated at $25 million.

1965 Rat Islands earthquake

The 1965 Rat Islands earthquake occurred at 05:01 UTC, on 4 February (19:01, 3 February local time). It had a magnitude of 8.7 and triggered a tsunami of over 10 m on Shemya Island, but caused very little damage.

1975 Hawaii earthquake

The 1975 Hawaii earthquake occurred on November 29 with a moment magnitude of 7.4 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VIII (Severe). The shock affected several of the Hawaiian Islands and resulted in the deaths of two people and up to 28 injured. Significant damage occurred in the southern part of the Big Island totaling $4–4.1 million and it also triggered a small brief eruption of Kilauea volcano.

The event generated a large tsunami that was as high as 47 feet (14 m) on Hawai'i island and was detected in Alaska, California, Japan, Okinawa, Samoa, and on Johnston and Wake Islands. Significant changes to the shorelines along the southern coast of the Big Island with subsidence of 12 feet (3.7 m) was observed, causing some areas to be permanently submerged. The source of the event was the Hilina Slump, which was also responsible for the more powerful 1868 Hawaii earthquake and tsunami.

1975 Morris earthquake

The 1975 Morris earthquake occurred in western Minnesota on July 9 at 14:54:15 UTC, or 9:54 a.m. The strongest instrumentally recorded rupture in the history of the state, it registered at magnitude 4.6 Mn and had a maximum Mercalli intensity of VI (Strong). It was the first earthquake to be recorded on any seismic instrument in the state since 1917. Tremors were felt over much of Minnesota, northern Iowa, and the eastern Dakotas.

1975 Near Islands earthquake

The 1975 Near Islands earthquake occurred at 08:43 UTC on February 2 off the coast of Attu Island, Alaska. The earthquake had a surface wave magnitude of 7.6 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of IX (Violent). It caused heavy damage on Shemya Island, injuring 15 residents. The runways of Shemya Air Force Base sustained cracks up to 16 inches (41 cm) wide, and crevices with as much as 54 feet (16.6 m) of displacement were observed on the island.

1990 Upland earthquake

The 1990 Upland earthquake occurred at 15:43:37 local time on February 28 with a moment magnitude of 5.7 and a maximum Mercalli Intensity of VII (Very strong). This left-lateral strike-slip earthquake occurred west of the San Andreas Fault System and injured thirty people, with total losses of $12.7 million. A large number of strong motion instruments captured the event, with an unexpectedly-high value seen on water tank near the epicentral area.

1995 Marathon earthquake

Striking on April 14, 1995, the 1995 Marathon earthquake was recorded at moment magnitude of 5.7. It rattled buildings near the epicenter.

1999 Hector Mine earthquake

The 1999 Hector Mine earthquake occurred on October 16 at 02:46:50 PDT with a moment magnitude of 7.1 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VII (Very strong). The strike-slip earthquake occurred in a remote part of the Mojave Desert, 47 miles (76 km) east-southeast of Barstow, California, inside the Twentynine Palms Marine Corps Base. Its name comes from a nearby quarry named Hector Mine, which is located 22 kilometers (14 mi) northwest of the epicenter.

2000 Yountville earthquake

The 2000 Yountville earthquake occurred with a moment magnitude of 5 on a previously unmapped fault, about 3 miles (4.8 km) south southwest of Yountville, California in the Mayacamas Mountain Range under Mount Veeder and about 9 miles (14 km) south northwest of Napa, California. It occurred at 01:36 PDT (08:36 UTC) on September 3.

2014 Aleutian Islands earthquake

The 2014 Aleutian Islands earthquake occurred on 23 June at 11:53 HDT (UTC-9) with a moment magnitude of 7.9 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of VI (Strong). The shock occurred in the Aleutian Islands – part of the US state of Alaska – 19 miles (31 km) southeast of Little Sitkin Island.

2014 Palma Bay earthquake

The 2014 Palma Bay earthquake occurred at 02:54 Alaska Daylight Time on July 25 in the northern southeastern panhandle of the U.S. state of Alaska. The earthquake registered 6.0 on the moment magnitude scale and had a maximum Mercalli intensity of IV (Light). It was centered on Palma Bay, 26 miles (42 km) from Elfin Cove and 94 miles (151 km) from the state capital of Juneau. Although there were no injuries or deaths, there were significant disruptions to Internet and telecommunications throughout Southeast Alaska, including to major telecom providers Alaska Communications Systems (ACS) and AT&T wireless, Internet and other communication systems.

Earthquakes in the United States
Historical
20th-century
21st-century
Swarms

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