List of comparative military ranks

This article is a list of various states' armed forces ranking designations. Comparisons are made between the different systems used by nations to categorize the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. Several of these lists mention NATO reference codes. These are the NATO rank reference codes, used for easy comparison among NATO countries. Links to comparison charts can be found below.

References to modern military

Afghanistan

Algeria

Angola

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Bangladesh

Belgium

Bhutan

Bolivia

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Brazil

Canada

Chile

People's Republic of China

Colombia

Congo

Congo-Brazzaville

Croatia

Cuba

Denmark

Egypt

Ecuador

Estonia

Finland

France

Gabon

Georgia

Germany

Greece

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Iran

Iraq

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Japan

Jordan

Kosovo

Laos

Lebanon

Lithuania

Malaysia

Mexico

Mongolia

Myanmar

Nepal

Netherlands

New Zealand

Nicaragua

North Korea

Norway

Pakistan

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russia

Saudi Arabia

Serbia

Singapore

Slovakia

  • Slovak Army officer ranks
  • Slovak Army other ranks

Slovenia

South Africa

South Korea

Spain

Sri Lanka

Sweden

Switzerland

Syria

Republic of China (Taiwan)

Tanzania

Thailand

Tunisia

Turkey

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom

United States

Venezuela

Vietnam

Continental comparisons

Africa

Americas

Asia

Europe

Oceania

Other comparisons

NATO

Commonwealth of Nations

Previous eras

Miscellaneous

First and Second World War comparisons

Brigadier

Brigadier is a military rank, the seniority of which depends on the country. In some countries, it is a senior rank above colonel, equivalent to a brigadier general, typically commanding a brigade of several thousand soldiers. In other countries, it is a non-commissioned rank (e.g. Spain, Italy, France, the Netherlands and the Indonesian Police ranks).

Canadian Armed Forces ranks and insignia

This is a table of the ranks and insignia of the Canadian Armed Forces. As the Canadian Armed Forces is officially bilingual, the French language ranks are presented following the English (in italics).

Chief warrant officer

Chief warrant officer is a military rank used by the United States Armed Forces, the Canadian Armed Forces, the Pakistan Air Force, the Israel Defense Forces, the South African National Defence Force, the Lebanese Armed Forces and, since 2012, the Singapore Armed Forces. In the United States Armed Forces, chief warrant officers are commissioned officers, not non-commissioned officers (NCOs) like in other NATO forces.

Colonel

Colonel ( "kernel"; abbreviated Col., Col or COL) is a senior military officer rank below the brigadier and general officer ranks. However, in some small military forces, such as those of Monaco or the Vatican, colonel is the highest rank. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations.

Historically, in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a colonel was typically in charge of a regiment in an army. Modern usage varies greatly, and in some cases, the term is used as an honorific title that may have no direct relationship to military service.

The rank of colonel is typically above the rank of lieutenant colonel. The rank above colonel is typically called brigadier, brigade general or brigadier general.

Equivalent naval ranks may be called captain or ship-of-the-line captain. In the Commonwealth air force rank system, the equivalent rank is group captain.

Comparative Ranks of Apartheid States in Southern Africa

Rank comparison charts of armies/ land forces of apartheid states and territories in Southern Africa.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of enlisted rank for armies/ land forces of African states.

Comparative army officer ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of African states.

Comparative officer ranks of World War I

The following table shows comparative officer ranks of several Allied and Central powers during World War I. Not all combatant countries are shown in the table. For modern ranks refer to List of comparative military ranks.

See also: Comparative officer ranks of World War II

Comparative officer ranks of World War II

The following table offers an approximate comparison for the officer ranks appointed by the major Allied powers, the major Axis powers and various occupied countries and co-belligerents during World War II.

Da jiang

Da jiang (simplified Chinese: 大将; traditional Chinese: 大將; pinyin: dà jiàng; literally: 'grand general') was a rank conferred in 1955 to ten veteran leaders of the People's Liberation Army. It was never conferred again and the rank was abolished in 1965 along with all other ranks in the PLA. It was considered equivalent to the Soviet rank of генера́л а́рмии (general armii, general of the army) and generally considered a five-star rank, although the insignia itself had only four due to the fact that China does not have brigadier general as a rank.

When ranks were reintroduced in 1988, the equivalent rank was given a different name yi ji shang jiang (Chinese: 一级上将; pinyin: yījí shàngjiàng; literally: 'first grade general'), perhaps so as to differentiate it from the ten original holders of the rank. In any event, no one was ever named to the new rank and it was discontinued in 1994.

Enlisted rank

An enlisted rank (also known as an enlisted grade or enlisted rate) is, in some armed services, any rank below that of a commissioned officer. The term can be inclusive of non-commissioned officers or warrant officers, except in United States military usage where warrant officers/chief warrant officers are a separate officer category ranking above enlisted grades and below commissioned officer grades. In most cases, enlisted service personnel perform jobs specific to their own occupational specialty, as opposed to the more generalized command responsibilities of commissioned officers. The term "enlistment" refers solely to a military commitment (whether officer or enlisted) whereas the terms "taken of strength" and "struck off strength" refer to a servicemember being carried on a given unit's roll.

Fleet admiral (United States)

Fleet admiral (abbreviated FADM) is a five-star flag officer rank in the United States Navy. Fleet admiral ranks immediately above admiral and is equivalent to General of the Army and General of the Air Force. Although it is a current and authorized rank, no U.S. Navy officer presently holds it, with the last U.S. Navy fleet admiral being Chester W. Nimitz, who died in 1966.

General officer

A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.The term general is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank.

It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général.

The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction.

Today, the title of general is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However, different countries use different systems of stars or other insignia for senior ranks. It has a NATO code of OF-9 and is the highest rank currently in use in a number of armies, air forces and marine organizations.

Gunnery sergeant

Gunnery sergeant (GySgt) is the seventh enlisted rank in the United States Marine Corps, just above staff sergeant and below master sergeant and first sergeant, and is a staff non-commissioned officer (SNCO). It has a pay grade of E-7.

The gunnery sergeant insignia consists of two M1 Garands centered vertically between three chevrons and two rockers.

Lieutenant (Royal Canadian Navy)

See "Lieutenant" for other countries which use this rankIn the Royal Canadian Navy, the rank of Lieutenant(N) (Lt(N)) (French: Lieutenant de vaisseau) is the naval rank equal to Captain in the army or air force. When the naval rank lieutenant is written or typed, it is followed by the letter (N) to indicate that it is a naval rank to distinguish it from army and air force Lieutenants. Lieutenants(N) are senior to Sub-Lieutenants and to army and air force Lieutenants, and are junior to Lieutenant-Commanders and Majors.Typical appointments for a Lieutenant(N) include:

Combat Director or Head of Department of a frigate, destroyer, supply ship

Training officer at Naval Fleet Schools or Naval Reserve divisions

Executive officer of a minor warship or submarine

Staff officer on a formation or task group headquarters staff.The rank insignia for a Lieutenant(N) is two ½-inch (13 mm) stripes with the executive curl on the top stripe, worn on the cuffs of the service dress jacket, and on slip-ons on other uniforms. As junior officers, they wear one gold band along the edge of the visor of their service caps. Lieutenants of the Naval Operations Branch wear the officer's pattern of the branch cap badge: an anchor on a black oval, surrounded by a wreath of maple leaves at the sides and base of the oval, the whole surmounted by the St Edward's Crown. Specialist officers in such branches as logistics, intelligence, medical, etc., wear their branch cap badges.

Prior to unification of the Canadian Forces in 1968, rank structure and insignia followed the British pattern. As part of the Canadian Naval Centennial the executive curl pattern of naval officer's rank was returned to all uniforms.

Lithuanian military ranks and insignia

Lithuanian military ranks and insignia consist of the list and ordering of the different military ranks, for the officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers of the modern Lithuanian Armed Forces. The ranks are visually represented by insignias placed on the uniforms.

Major

Major is a military rank of commissioned officer status, with corresponding ranks existing in many military forces throughout the world.

Officer (armed forces)

An officer is a member of an armed forces or uniformed service who holds a position of authority.

In its broadest sense, the term "officer" refers to commissioned officers, non-commissioned officers, and warrant officers. However, when used without further detail, the term almost always refers to only commissioned officers, the more senior portion of a force who derive their authority from a commission from the head of state.

Private (rank)

A private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to NATO Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in).

In modern military writing, "private" is abridged to "Pte" in the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth of Nations countries and to "Pvt." in the United States.

Comparative military ranks in English
Navies Armies Air forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Flight sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
Talk·View
Military ranks and insignia by country
Africa
Americas
Asia
Europe
Oceania
Post-Soviet states
Commonwealth of Nations
NATO

Languages

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