List of colonial governors of Louisiana

This is a list of the colonial governors of Louisiana, from the founding of the first settlement by the French in 1699 to the territory's acquisition by the United States in 1803.

The French and Spanish governors administered a territory which was much larger than the modern U.S. state of Louisiana, comprising Louisiana (New France) and Louisiana (New Spain), respectively.

At the same time, there are parts of present-day Louisiana which were historically administered by other colonial powers, with the most prominent example being the area known as the Florida Parishes, north of Lake Pontchartrain and east of the Mississippi River. This territory was originally part of French Louisiana, but it belonged to the Kingdom of Great Britain for twenty years (1763–83) following the French and Indian War.

List

First French Louisiana (1682–1762)

# Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Took office Left office
1 No image Sauvolle
(1671–1701)
1699 1701
(Died in office)
2 Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville
(1680–1767)
1701 1713
3 Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac
(1658–1730)
1713 1716
4 Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville
(1680–1767)
1716 1717
5 No image Jean-Michel de Lepinay
(16??–17??)
1717 1718
6 Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville
(1680–1767)
1718 1724
7 No image Pierre Dugué de Boisbriand
(1675–1736)
1724 1726
8 No image Étienne Périer
(1687–1766)
1726 1733
9 Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville
(1680–1767)
1733 1743
10 Marquis de Vaudreuil Pierre de Rigaud de Vaudreuil-Cavagnial
(1698–1778)
1743 1753
11 No image Louis Billouart
(1704–1770)
1753 1763
12 Jean-JacquesBlaised'abbadie Jean-Jacques Blaise d'Abbadie
(1726–1765)
1763 1765
(Died in office)
13 No image Charles Philippe Aubry
(17??–1770)
1765 1768

Spanish Louisiana (1762–1802)

# Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Took office Left office
14 Almirante Antonio de Ulloa Antonio de Ulloa
(1716–1795)
1766 1768
15 No image Charles Philippe Aubry
(17??–1770)
1768 1769
16 Alejandro O'Reilly by Francisco José de Goya Alejandro O'Reilly
(1722–1794)
1769 1769
17 No image Luis de Unzaga
(1721–1790)
1770 1777
18 Bernardo de Gálvez Bernardo de Gálvez
(1746–1786)
1777 1785
19 Esteban Rodríguez Miró Esteban Rodríguez Miró
(1744–1795)
1785 1791
20 Retrato del Barón de Carondelet - Anónimo (siglo XIX) Francisco Luis Héctor de Carondelet
(1748–1807)
1791 1797
21 Manuel-gayoso-de-lemos-governor-of-natchez Manuel Gayoso de Lemos
(1747–1799)
1797 1799
22 Francisco Bouligny Francisco Bouligny
(1736–1800)
1799 1799
23 No image Sebastián Calvo de la Puerta y O'Farrill
(1751–1820)
1799 1801
24 No image Nicolás María Vidal (Acting Civil Governor)
(1739–1806)
1799 1801
25 No image Juan Manuel de Salcedo
(1743–18??)
1801 1803

Second French Louisiana (1802–1804)

# Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Took office Left office
Laussat Pierre Clément de Laussat**
(1756–1835)
1803 1803

**Laussat was initially only to be the interim head of Louisiana until arrival of the Governor General Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte appointed by Napoleon. However, news of the Sale of Louisiana reached Bernadotte before he could sail from La Rochelle in May 1803.

See also

List of Governors of Louisiana

This is a list of the Governors of Louisiana (French: Gouverneurs de Louisiane), from acquisition by the United States in 1803 to the present day. For earlier governors of Louisiana see List of colonial governors of Louisiana.

The longest-serving Governor is Edwin Edwards, who served for 16 years from (1972-1980; 1984-1988; 1992-1996).

List of Hispanos

This is a list of Hispanos, both settlers and their descendants (either fully or partially of such origin), who were born or settled, between the early 16th century and 1850, in what is now the southwestern United States (including California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, southwestern Colorado, Utah and Nevada), as well as Florida, Louisiana (1763–1800) and other Spanish colonies in what is now the United States. Governors and explorers, who spent time in these places serving the Spanish crown but never settled in them as colonists, are not included, although they also helped shape the history of the present United States. This list shows notable people of Spanish and Mexican origin who lived in the Hispanic colonies now part of the United States, as well as their descendants.

Lists of governors of colonial America

This are lists of governors of colonial America.

List of colonial governors of Connecticut

List of colonial governors of Florida

List of colonial governors of Georgia

List of colonial governors of Louisiana

List of colonial governors of Maryland

List of colonial governors of Maine

List of colonial governors of Massachusetts

List of colonial governors of New Hampshire

List of colonial governors of New Jersey

List of Spanish governors of New Mexico

List of colonial governors of New York

List of colonial governors of North Carolina

List of colonial governors of Pennsylvania

List of colonial governors of Rhode Island

List of colonial governors of South Carolina

List of colonial governors of Virginia

Louisiana (New France)

Louisiana (French: La Louisiane; La Louisiane française) or French Louisiana was an administrative district of New France. Under French control 1682 to 1762 and 1801 (nominally) to 1803, the area was named in honor of King Louis XIV, by French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle. It originally covered an expansive territory that included most of the drainage basin of the Mississippi River and stretched from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Appalachian Mountains to the Rocky Mountains.

Louisiana included two regions, now known as Upper Louisiana (French: la Haute-Louisiane), which began north of the Arkansas River, and Lower Louisiana (French: la Basse-Louisiane). The U.S. state of Louisiana is named for the historical region, although it is only a small part of the vast lands claimed by France.French exploration of the area began during the reign of Louis XIV, but French Louisiana was not greatly developed, due to a lack of human and financial resources. As a result of its defeat in the Seven Years' War, France was forced to cede the east part of the territory in 1763 to the victorious British, and the west part to Spain as compensation for Spain losing Florida. France regained sovereignty of the western territory in the secret Third Treaty of San Ildefonso of 1800. But strained by obligations in Europe, Napoleon Bonaparte sold the territory to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, ending France's presence in Louisiana.

The United States ceded part of the Louisiana Purchase to the United Kingdom in the Treaty of 1818. This section lies above the 49th parallel north in a part of present-day Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Louisiana (New Spain)

Louisiana (Spanish: Luisiana) was the name of an administrative district of the Viceroyalty of New Spain from 1763 to 1801 that consisted of territory west of the Mississippi River basin, plus New Orleans. Spain acquired the territory from France, which had named it La Louisiane in honor of King Louis XIV in 1682. It is sometimes known as Spanish Louisiana. The district was retroceded to France, under the terms of the Third Treaty of San Ildefonso (1800) and the Treaty of Aranjuez (1801). In 1802, King Charles IV of Spain published a royal bill on 14 October, effecting the transfer and outlining the conditions.

However, Spain agreed to continue administering the colony until French officials arrived and formalized the transfer (1803). The ceremony was conducted at the Cabildo in New Orleans on 30 November 1803, just three weeks before the formalities of cession from France to the United States pursuant to the Louisiana Purchase.

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