List of canonised popes

This article lists the Popes who have been canonised or recognised as Saints in the Roman Catholic Church they had led. A total of 83 (out of 266) Popes have been recognised universally as canonised saints, including all of the first 35 Popes (31 of whom were martyrs) and 52 of the first 54. If Pope Liberius is numbered amongst the Saints as in Eastern Christianity, all of the first 49 Popes become recognised as Saints, of whom 31 are Martyr-Saints, and 53 of the first 54 Pontiffs would be acknowledged as Saints. In addition, 13 other Popes are in the process of becoming canonised Saints: as of December 2018, two are recognised as being Servants of God, two are recognised as being Venerable, and nine have been declared Blessed or Beati, making a total of 95 (97 if Pope Liberius and Pope Adeodatus II are recognised to be Saints) of the 266 Roman Pontiffs being recognised and venerated for their heroic virtues and inestimable contributions to the Church.

The most recently reigning Pope to have been canonised was Pope John Paul II, whose cause for canonisation was opened in May 2005. John Paul II was beatified on May 1, 2011, by Pope Benedict XVI and later canonised, along with Pope John XXIII, by Pope Francis on April 27, 2014.[1] Pope Francis also canonised Pope Paul VI on October 14, 2018.

Saints

  1. Pope Adeodatus I[2]
  2. Pope Adrian III[3]
  3. Pope Agapetus I
  4. Pope Agatho
  5. Pope Alexander I
  6. Pope Anacletus
  7. Pope Anicetus
  8. Pope Anastasius I
  9. Pope Anterus
  10. Pope Benedict II
  11. Pope Boniface I
  12. Pope Boniface IV
  13. Pope Caius
  14. Pope Callixtus I
  15. Pope Celestine I
  16. Pope Celestine V
  17. Pope Clement I
  18. Pope Cornelius
  19. Pope Damasus I
  20. Pope Dionysius
  21. Pope Eleuterus
  22. Pope Eugene I
  23. Pope Eusebius
  24. Pope Eutychian
  25. Pope Evaristus
  26. Pope Fabian
  27. Pope Felix I
  28. Pope Felix III
  29. Pope Felix IV
  30. Pope Gelasius I
  31. Pope Gregory I (St. Gregory the Great)
  32. Pope Gregory II
  33. Pope Gregory III
  34. Pope Gregory VII
  35. Pope Hilarius
  36. Pope Hormisdas
  37. Pope Hyginus
  38. Pope Innocent I
  39. Pope John I
  40. Pope John XXIII
  41. Pope John Paul II (St. John Paul the Great)
  42. Pope Julius I
  43. Pope Leo I (St. Leo the Great)
  44. Pope Leo II
  45. Pope Leo III
  46. Pope Leo IV
  47. Pope Leo IX
  48. Pope Linus
  49. Pope Lucius I
  50. Pope Marcellinus
  51. Pope Marcellus I
  52. Pope Mark
  53. Pope Martin I
  54. Pope Miltiades
  55. Pope Nicholas I (St. Nicholas the Great)
  56. Pope Paschal I
  57. Pope Paul I
  58. Pope Paul VI[4]
  59. Pope Peter
  60. Pope Pius I
  61. Pope Pius V
  62. Pope Pius X
  63. Pope Pontian
  64. Pope Sergius I
  65. Pope Silverius
  66. Pope Simplicius
  67. Pope Siricius
  68. Pope Sixtus I
  69. Pope Sixtus II
  70. Pope Sixtus III
  71. Pope Soter
  72. Pope Stephen I
  73. Pope Stephen IV
  74. Pope Sylvester I
  75. Pope Symmachus
  76. Pope Telesphorus
  77. Pope Urban I
  78. Pope Victor I
  79. Pope Vitalian
  80. Pope Zachary
  81. Pope Zephyrinus
  82. Pope Zosimus

(83) Pope Adeodatus II is recognised and venerated by some Roman Catholics.

(84) Pope Liberius is regarded as a Saint in most of Eastern Christianity.

Blesseds

  1. Pope Benedict XI
  2. Pope Eugene III
  3. Pope Gregory X
  4. Pope Innocent V
  5. Pope Innocent XI
  6. Pope Pius IX[5]
  7. Pope Urban II
  8. Pope Urban V[6]
  9. Pope Victor III[7]

Venerables

  1. Pope John Paul I[8]
  2. Pope Pius XII

Servants of God

  1. Pope Benedict XIII[9]
  2. Pope Pius VII

See also

Lists

Related topics

References

  1. ^ Pentin, Edward. "It’s Official: John Paul II and John XXIII to Be Canonized April 27", National Catholic Register, Oct 14, 2013
  2. ^ Kelly, Leo. "Pope St. Deusdedit." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 4. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1908. 2 April 2016
  3. ^ Loughlin, James. "Pope St. Adrian III." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 2 April 2016
  4. ^ Declaration of the heroic virtue of the servant of God, Paul VI
  5. ^ Biography of Bl. Pope Pius IX
  6. ^ Webster, Douglas Raymund. "Pope Bl. Urban V." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 15. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. 13 Feb. 2013
  7. ^ Webster, Douglas Raymund. "Pope Blessed Victor III." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 15. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. 13 Feb. 2013
  8. ^ Opening of the cause of canonization of the Servant of God Albino Luciani, Pope John Paul I: November 23, 2003
  9. ^ Miranda, Salvador. "Orsini, O.P., Vincenzo Maria", Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church, August 18, 2015
List of popes

This chronological list of popes corresponds to that given in the Annuario Pontificio under the heading "I Sommi Pontefici Romani" (The Supreme Pontiffs of Rome), excluding those that are explicitly indicated as antipopes. Published every year by the Roman Curia, the Annuario Pontificio attaches no consecutive numbers to the popes, stating that it is impossible to decide which side represented at various times the legitimate succession, in particular regarding Pope Leo VIII, Pope Benedict V and some mid-11th-century popes. The 2001 edition of the Annuario Pontificio introduced "almost 200 corrections to its existing biographies of the popes, from St Peter to John Paul II". The corrections concerned dates, especially in the first two centuries, birthplaces and the family name of one pope.The term pope (Latin: papa, lit. 'father') is used in several Churches to denote their high spiritual leaders (for example Coptic Pope). This title in English usage usually refers to the head of the Catholic Church. The Catholic pope uses various titles by tradition, including Summus Pontifex, Pontifex Maximus, and Servus servorum Dei. Each title has been added by unique historical events and unlike other papal prerogatives, is not incapable of modification.Hermannus Contractus may have been the first historian to number the popes continuously. His list ends in 1049 with Pope Leo IX as number 154. Several changes were made to the list during the 20th century. Antipope Christopher was considered legitimate for a long time. Pope-elect Stephen was considered legitimate under the name Stephen II until the 1961 edition, when his name was erased. Although these changes are no longer controversial, a number of modern lists still include this "first Pope Stephen II". It is probable that this is because they are based on the 1913 edition of the Catholic Encyclopedia, which is in the public domain.

A significant number of these popes have been recognized as saints, including 48 out of the first 50 consecutive popes, and others are in the sainthood process. Of the first 31 popes, 28 died as martyrs (see List of murdered popes).

List of popes who died violently

A collection of popes who have had violent deaths through the centuries. The circumstances have ranged from martyrdom (Pope Stephen I) to war (Lucius II), to a beating by a jealous husband (Pope John XII). A number of other popes have died under circumstances that some believe to be murder, but for which definitive evidence has not been found.

Pope

The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas, "father"), also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest priest"), is the Bishop of Rome and ex officio leader of the worldwide Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.While his office is called the papacy, the episcopal see and ecclesiastical jurisdiction is called the Holy See. It is the Holy See that is the sovereign entity of international law headquartered in the distinctively independent Vatican City State, established by the Lateran Treaty in 1929 between Italy and the Holy See to ensure its temporal, diplomatic, and spiritual independence. The primacy of the Bishop of Rome is largely derived from his role as the apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom primacy was conferred by Jesus, giving him the Keys of Heaven and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built.

The apostolic see of Rome was founded by Saint Peter and Saint Paul in 1st century, according to Catholic tradition. The papacy is one of the most enduring institutions in the world and has had a prominent part in world history. In ancient times the popes helped spread Christianity, and intervened to find resolutions in various doctrinal disputes. In the Middle Ages, they played a role of secular importance in Western Europe, often acting as arbitrators between Christian monarchs. Currently, in addition to the expansion of the Christian faith and doctrine, the popes are involved in ecumenism and interfaith dialogue, charitable work, and the defense of human rights.In some periods of history, the papacy, which originally had no temporal powers, accrued wide secular powers rivaling those of temporal rulers. However, in recent centuries the temporal authority of the papacy has declined and the office is now almost exclusively focused on religious matters. By contrast, papal claims of spiritual authority have been increasingly firmly expressed over time, culminating in 1870 with the proclamation of the dogma of papal infallibility for rare occasions when the pope speaks ex cathedra—literally "from the chair (of Saint Peter)"—to issue a formal definition of faith or morals. Still, the Pope is considered one of the world's most powerful people because of his extensive diplomatic, cultural, and spiritual influence on 1.3 billion Catholics and beyond, as well as the official representative of the Catholic Church being the largest non-government provider of education and health care in the world, with a vast international network of charities.

Pope Stephen III

Pope Stephen III (Latin: Stephanus III; d. 1 February 772) was the Pope from 7 August 768 to his death in 772.

Stephen was a Benedictine monk who worked in the Lateran Palace during the tenure of Pope Zachary. In the midst of a tumultuous contest by rival factions to name a successor to Pope Paul I, Stephen was elected with the support of the Roman officials. He summoned the Lateran Council of 769 which sought to limit the influence of the nobles in papal elections. The Council also opposed iconoclasm.

1st–4th centuries
During the Roman Empire (until 493)
including under Constantine (312–337)
5th–8th centuries
Ostrogothic Papacy (493–537)
Byzantine Papacy (537–752)
Frankish Papacy (756–857)
9th–12th centuries
Papal selection before 1059
Saeculum obscurum (904–964)
Crescentii era (974–1012)
Tusculan Papacy (1012–1044/1048)
Imperial Papacy (1048–1257)
13th–16th centuries
Viterbo (1257–1281)
Orvieto (1262–1297)
Perugia (1228–1304)
Avignon Papacy (1309–1378)
Western Schism (1378–1417)
Renaissance Papacy (1417–1534)
Reformation Papacy (1534–1585)
Baroque Papacy (1585–1689)
17th–20th centuries
Age of Enlightenment (c. 1640-1740)
Revolutionary Papacy (1775–1848)
Roman Question (1870–1929)
Vatican City (1929–present)
21st century
History of the papacy

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