List of birds

This page lists living orders and families of birds. The links below should then lead to family accounts and hence to individual species.

The passerines (perching birds) alone account for well over 5000 species. In total there are about 10,000 species of birds described worldwide, though one estimate of the real number places it at almost twice that[1].

Taxonomy is very fluid in the age of DNA analysis, so comments are made where appropriate, and all numbers are approximate. In particular see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy for a very different classification.

King Penguins at Salisbury Plain (5719466981)
King penguins
Ostriches cape point cropped
Ostriches

Phylogeny

Cladogram of modern bird relationships based on Jarvis, E.D. et al. (2014)[2] with some clade names after Yury, T. et al. (2013).[3]

Aves
Palaeognathae
Struthionimorphae

Struthioniformes (ostriches)[4]

Notopalaeognathae
Rheimorphae

Rheiformes (rheas)

Novaeratitae

Casuariiformes (cassowaries & emus)

Apterygiformes (kiwi)

Aepyornithiformes (elephant birds)

Tinamomorphae

Dinornithiformes (moas)

Lithornithiformes (false tinamous)

Tinamiformes (tinamous)

Neognathae
Galloanserae
Gallomorphae

Galliformes (landfowl)

Odontoanserae

Odontopterygiformes

Anserimorphae

Vegaviiformes[5]

Gastornithiformes

Anseriformes (waterfowl)

Neoaves
Columbea
Mirandornithes

Phoenicopteriformes (flamingoes)

Podicipediformes (grebes)

Columbimorphae

Mesitornithiformes (mesites)

Pteroclidiformes (sandgrouse)

Columbiformes (pigeons)

Passerea
Otidae
Otidimorphae

Cuculiformes (cuckoos)

Otidiformes (bustards)

Musophagiformes (turacos)

Cypselomorphae

Caprimulgiformes (nightjars)

Nyctibiiformes (oilbirds & potoos)

Podargiformes (frogmouths)

Aegotheliformes (owlet-nightjars)

Apodiformes (hummingbirds & swifts)

Gruae

Opisthocomiformes (hoatzin)

Cursorimorphae

Gruiformes (rails and cranes)

Charadriiformes (shorebirds)

Ardeae
Phaethontimorphae

Eurypygiformes (sunbittern, kagu)

Phaethontiformes (tropicbirds)

Aequornithes

Gaviiformes (loons)

Austrodyptornithes

Procellariiformes (albatross and petrels)

Sphenisciformes (penguins)

Ciconiiformes (storks)

Suliformes (boobies, cormorants, etc.)

Pelecaniformes (pelicans, herons & egrets)

Telluraves
Afroaves
Accipitrimorphae

Cathartiformes (condors and New World vultures)

Accipitriformes (hawks, eagles, vultures, etc.)

Strigiformes (owls)

Coraciimorphae

Coliiformes (mousebirds)

Cavitaves

Leptosomatiformes (cuckoo roller)

Eucavitaves

Trogoniformes (trogons)

Picocoraciae

Bucerotiformes (hornbills, hoopoe and wood hoopoes)

Picodynastornithes

Coraciformes (kingfishers etc.)

Piciformes (woodpeckers etc.)

Australaves

Cariamiformes (seriemas)

Eufalconimorphae

Falconiformes (falcons)

Psittacopasserae

Psittaciformes (parrots)

Passeriformes (songbirds and kin)

Paleognathae

The flightless and mostly giant Struthioniformes lack a keeled sternum and are collectively known as ratites. Together with the Tinamiformes, they form the Paleognathae or "old jaws", one of the two superorders recognized within the taxonomic class Aves.

Struthioniformes

Greater rhea pair arp
Greater rhea pair

Africa; 2 species

Notopalaeognathae

Rheiformes

South America; 2 species

  • †Opisthodactylidae
  • Rheidae: rheas

Casuariiformes

Australasia; 4 species

Apterygiformes

Australasia; 5 species

Aepyornithiformes

Madagascar

Dinornithiformes

New Zealand

Tinamiformes

South America; 45 species

Neognathae

Nearly all living birds belong to the superorder Neognathae or "new jaws". With their keeled sternum (breastbone), unlike the ratites, they are known as carinatae.

Galloanserae

Galliformes

Australian Brush turkey2.jpeg
Australian brush turkey

Worldwide; 250 species

Gastornithiformes

Anseriformes

Worldwide; 150 species

Mirandornithes

Podicipediformes

Worldwide; 19 species

Phoenicopteriformes

Worldwide; 6 species

Columbimorphae

Columbiformes

Worldwide; 300 species

Pteroclidiformes

Africa, Europe, Asia; 16 species

Mesitornithiformes

Madagascar; 3 species

Cypselomorphae

Caprimulgiformes

Worldwide; 500 species

Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) 2
Tawny frogmouth

Otidimorphae

Cuculiformes

Worldwide; 126 species

Musophagiformes

Africa; 23 species

Otidiformes

Africa and Eurasia; 27 species

Gruae

Opisthocomiformes

South America; 1 species

Gruiformes

Worldwide; 164 species

Charadriiformes

Worldwide; 350 species

Greater Painted-snipe, Rostratula benghalensis - female (12366707985)
Greater painted-snipe
Flickr - Rainbirder - Egyptian Plover (Pluvianus aegyptius)
Egyptian plover
Pedionomus torquatus, South Australia 2
Plains-wanderer

Phaethontimorphae

Eurypygiformes

Neotropics and New Caledonia; 2 species

Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias)
Sunbittern

Phaethontiformes

Oceanic; 3 species

Aequornithes

Gaviiformes

North America, Eurasia; 5 species

Sphenisciformes

Antarctic and southern waters; 17 species

Procellariiformes

Pan-oceanic; 120 species

Ciconiiformes

Worldwide; 19 species

White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) (5)
White stork

Suliformes

Worldwide; 59 species

Pelecaniformes

Worldwide; 108 species

Afroaves

Accipitriformes

Worldwide; 200 species

Strigiformes

Worldwide; 130 species

Coliiformes

Sub-Saharan Africa; 6 species

Leptosomatiformes

Madagascar; 1 species

Trogoniformes

Sub-Saharan Africa, Americas, Asia; 35 species

Bucerotiformes

Old World, New Guinea; 64 species

Coraciiformes

Worldwide; 144 species

Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) in Hyderabad W IMG 8523
Kingfisher

Piciformes

Worldwide except Australasia; 400 species

Australaves

Cariamiformes

South America; 2 species

Falconiformes

Worldwide; 60 species

Psittaciformes

Pan-tropical, southern temperate zones; 330 species

Passeriformes

Worldwide; 5,000 species

See also

References

  1. ^ Barrowclough GF, Cracraft J, Klicka J, Zink RM (2016) How Many Kinds of Birds Are There and Why Does It Matter? PLoS ONE 11(11): e0166307. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0166307
  2. ^ Jarvis, E.D.; et al. (2014). "Whole-genome analyses resolve early branches in the tree of life of modern birds". Science. 346 (6215): 1320–1331. doi:10.1126/science.1253451. PMC 4405904. PMID 25504713.
  3. ^ Yuri, T.; et al. (2013). "Parsimony and Model-Based Analyses of Indels in Avian Nuclear Genes Reveal Congruent and Incongruent Phylogenetic Signals". Biology. 2 (1): 419–444. doi:10.3390/biology2010419. PMC 4009869. PMID 24832669.
  4. ^ Boyd, John (2007). "NEORNITHES: 46 Orders" (PDF). John Boyd's website. Retrieved 30 December 2017.
  5. ^ Worthy, T.H.; Degrange, F.J.; Handley, W.D.; Lee, M.S.Y. (2017). "The evolution of giant flightless birds and novel phylogenetic relationships for extinct fowl (Aves, Galloanseres)". Royal Society Open Science. 11.
Bird of prey

Birds of prey, or raptors, include species of bird that primarily hunt and feed on vertebrates that are large relative to the hunter. Additionally, they have keen eyesight for detecting food at a distance or during flight, strong feet equipped with talons for grasping or killing prey, and powerful, curved beaks for tearing flesh. The term raptor is derived from the Latin word rapio, meaning to seize or take by force. In addition to hunting live prey, most also eat carrion, at least occasionally, and vultures and condors eat carrion as their main food source.Although the term bird of prey could theoretically be taken to include all birds that primarily consume animals, ornithologists typically use the narrower definition followed in this page. Examples of animal-eating birds not encompassed by the ornithological definition include storks, herons, gulls, skuas, penguins, kookaburras, and shrikes, as well as the many songbirds that are primarily insectivorous.

Birds of Prey (TV series)

Birds of Prey is an American television drama series. The series was developed by Laeta Kalogridis for The WB and is loosely based on the DC Comics series of the same name. The series takes place in a Gotham City abandoned by Batman. Despite the series debut garnering ratings of 7.6 million viewers (at the time, the network's largest premiere in the 18–34 demographic), the series was canceled after ratings fell sharply in subsequent weeks. Thirteen episodes were produced and aired in total.

Fauna of Serbia

See

List of birds of Serbia

List of mammals of Serbia

James L. Peters

James Lee Peters (August 13, 1889 – April 19, 1952) was an American ornithologist.

List of birds by population

This is a list of bird species by global population, divided by bird classification. While numbers are estimates, they have been made by the experts in their fields. For more information on how these estimates were ascertained, see Wikipedia's articles on population biology and population ecology. Contributing organizations include the IUCN, BirdLife International, and Partners in Flight.

This list is incomplete, because experts have not estimated all bird numbers. For example, the spectacled flowerpecker was only discovered in 2010, and has yet to be classified with a Linnean name, but would add to the other 73 new bird species described by ornithologists from 2000 – 2009. Global population estimates for many of these at this time would lack accuracy.

All numbers are estimates, because they are taken by observation, and a given number of 50 slender-billed curlews does not necessarily mean there are 10 more of this species than the black stilt, which has been estimated at 40: there is a possibility that the latter species has a larger population than the former. This list should not be taken that literally. An estimate of 250 shore dotterels compared with 4,500 – 5,000 wrybills, on the other hand, means that the latter has well over one order of magnitude more individuals than the former. The wrybill only has approximately one tenth the population of great skuas (48,000), which are outnumbered ~10:1 by the pigeon guillemot (470,000). It is these large differences between species that this list tries to convey.

List of birds of American Samoa

This is a list of the bird species recorded in American Samoa. The avifauna of American Samoa include a total of 65 species, of which 5 have been introduced by humans, 14 are rare or accidental and 1 species, the Mao, is extirpated. 6 species are globally threatened. American Samoa has no endemic bird species but several near-endemics occur and many of the land birds occur in good numbers. A variety of seabirds breed in the islands. Hunting and introduced predators have reduced their numbers but there are still some important breeding sites such as Lata Mountain on Ta'u Island.This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for American Samoa.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories, but not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in American Samoa

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to American Samoa as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in American Samoa although populations exist elsewhere

List of birds of California

This list of birds of California is a comprehensive listing of all the bird species seen naturally in the U.S. state of California as determined by the California Bird Records Committee (CBRC).As of December 2018, there are 673 species on this list. Two of these species are endemic, 11 were introduced by humans (directly or indirectly), one species has been extirpated, and one was extirpated in the wild but its reintroduction is in progress. Four additional species have been documented but "the CBRC could not reach a consensus as to whether records of these species involved true naturally occurring vagrants or escapes from captivity." The following tags note species in each of those categories and one additional category:

(En) Endemic to California

(I) Introduced but now established in California

(Ex) Extirpated from California

(RI) Reintroduction in progress - not yet established

(*) California Bird Records Committee Review Species (194 species; in general, review species average four or fewer occurrences per year in California over the most recent ten-year period.)

(UO) Of unknown originIndividuals or even flocks of many additional species have been recorded in California but these birds are assumed to be deliberately released or escaped from captivity. In the absence of evidence of wild origin, they are not included in the CBRC list.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list. The taxonomic sequencing of these bird species (as opposed to alphabetical) is done to more easily enable the identification of common traits between closely related species. With taxonomic sequencing, closely related species tend to be listed adjacent to one another.

List of birds of Georgia (country)

This is a list of the bird species recorded in the country of Georgia. The avifauna of Georgia include a total of 361 species, of which 11 are rare or accidental.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Accidental species are included in the total species count for Georgia.

The following tag has been used to highlight accidentals. The commonly occurring native species are untagged.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Georgia

List of birds of Greece

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Greece. The avifauna of Greece include a total of 453 species according to the Hellenic Rarities Committee of the Hellenic Ornithological Society (Ελληνική Ορνιθολογική Εταιρεία). Of them, four have not been recorded since 1950 and two have been introduced by humans.This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (English and scientific names) are those of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition.The following tags have been used to highlight several categories of occurrence. Species without tags are regularly occurring residents, migrants, or seasonal visitors which have been recorded since 1 January 1950.

(*) Rare in Greece; reports of these 120 species require submission to the Hellenic Rarities Committee for inclusion in the official record.

(B) Species which have not occurred in Greece since 1 January 1950.

(C) Species that do not occur naturally in Greece, although breeding populations have been introduced by humans.

List of birds of Mont-Tremblant National Park

This lists the species of birds in Mont-Tremblant National Park in Quebec, Canada. The bolded species indicate that they are threatened in the area.

List of birds of North America

The lists of birds in the light blue box below are divided by biological family. The lists are based on The AOU Check-list of North American Birds of the American Ornithological Society supplemented with checklists from Panama, Greenland, Bermuda and Trinidad and Tobago. It includes the birds of Greenland, Canada, the United States (excluding Hawaii), Mexico, Central America, Bermuda, and the Caribbean Islands including offshore islands of Colombia and Venezuela.

List of birds of North Carolina

This list of birds of North Carolina includes species documented in the U.S. state of North Carolina and accepted by the North Carolina Bird Records Committee (NCBRC) of the Carolina Bird Club. As of January 2019, there are 469 species and a species pair definitively included in the official list. Twelve additional species, one of which is identified only at the genus level, are on the list but classed as provisional. Of the 482 species, 85 are rare anywhere in the state, 92 are rare in some part of the state or in a single season, six have been introduced to North America, and four are extinct.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition through the 59th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, all species listed below are considered to occur regularly in North Carolina as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. The following tags are used to designate some species:

(R) - Rare - a species whose report is reviewable by the NCBRC if the bird is found anywhere in North Carolina

(RC) - Rare coastal - a species whose report is reviewable by the NCBRC if the bird is found along the coast

(RD) - Rare downstate - a species whose report is reviewable by the NCBRC if the bird is found in the southern part of the state

(RI) - Rare inland - a species whose report is reviewable by the NCBRC if the bird is found away from the coast

(RM) - Rare in mountains - a species whose report is reviewable by the NCBRC if the bird is found in the mountainous part of the state

(RS) - Rare in spring - a species whose report is reviewable by the NCBRC if the bird is found in the spring

(I) - Introduced - a species introduced to North America by humans, either directly or indirectly

(E) - Extinct - a recent species that no longer exists

(P) - Provisional list - a species that has been approved by the NCBRC but is known only from sight records

List of birds of Samoa

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Samoa. The avifauna of Samoa include a total of 82 species, of which ten are endemic, five have been introduced by humans and 23 are rare or accidental. Seven species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Samoa.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. Not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Samoa

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Samoa

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Samoa as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Santa Cruz County, California

List of birds of Santa Cruz County, California. The county is in Northern California, located on the California coast, including northern Monterey Bay, and west of the San Francisco Bay and Silicon Valley. It includes the southwestern Santa Cruz Mountains.Avian habitats include: coastal prairie, Northern coastal scrub, Maritime Ponderosa Pine forests, Coast redwood forests, Interior chaparral and woodlands, and mixed evergreen forests.

Included are: common (C), fairly common (F), and uncommon (U) sightings/occurrences. Not included are: rare, casual, and irregular sightings.

List of birds of the Indiana Dunes

This is a list of birds of the Indiana Dunes.

The Indiana Dunes (State Park and National Park) protect over 15,000 acres (61 km2) of dunes and shoreline. From the barren sand beaches to the inter-dunal ponds and the intervening forest, this area is inhabited by 271 identified species of birds.

Because the area forms part of the Mississippi Flyways, many more species of birds can be observed there during spring and fall migration times.

List of birds of the Klamath Basin

The following bird species are found in the Klamath Basin, Oregon, and related areas; (a few species listed are only "native" and have a larger continental range). The Klamath Basin is within the Pacific Flyway so, over 350 species can be spotted migrating through the flyover.

List of birds of the Netherlands

This is a list of the bird species recorded in the Netherlands. The avifauna of the Netherlands included a total of 534 species recorded in the wild by early 2018 according to Checklist of Dutch bird species and Bird Checklists of the World. Of these species, 238 are accidental, 16 have been introduced by humans, and one is extinct.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition.The following tags have been used to highlight some categories of occurrence. The (A) tags are from one or both of Checklist of Dutch bird species and Bird Checklists of the World, and (I) tags are from Bird Checklists of the World. The notes of population status such as "endangered" apply to the world population and are also from Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in the Netherlands

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to the Netherlands as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of the Sierra Madre Occidental

This is a list of birds whose range includes, at least in part, the Sierra Madre Occidental, a mountain range in western Mexico and the extreme southwest of the United States.

Bright-rumped attila, Attila spadiceus

Lazuli bunting, Passerina amoena

Bushtit, Psaltriparus minimus

Mexican chickadee, Poecile sclateri

American dipper, Cinclus mexicanus

Blue-hooded euphonia, Euphonia elegantissima

Cordilleran flycatcher, Empidonax occidentalis

Hammond's flycatcher, Empidonax hammondii

Pine flycatcher, Empidonax affinis

Evening grosbeak, Coccothraustes vespertinus

Yellow grosbeak, Pheucticus chrysopeplus

Rusty-crowned ground-sparrow, Melozone kieneri

Blue-throated hummingbird, Lampornis clemenciae

Broad-tailed hummingbird, Selasphorus platycercus

Magnificent hummingbird, Eugenes fulgens

White-eared hummingbird, Hylocharis leucotis

Mexican jay, Aphelocoma ultramarina

White-tailed kite, Elanus leucurus

Black-throated magpie-jay, Calocitta colliei

Purple martin, Progne subis

Buff-collared nightjar, Antrostomus ridgwayi

Pygmy nuthatch, Sitta pygmaea

Elf owl, Micrathene whitneyi

Flammulated owl, Otus flammeolus

Spotted owl, Strix occidentalis

Whiskered screech-owl, Megascops trichopsis

Thick-billed parrot, Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha

Western wood pewee, Contopus sordidulus

Band-tailed pigeon, Patagioenas fasciata

Elegant quail, Callipepla douglasii

Montezuma quail, Cyrtonyx montezumae

Eared quetzal, Euptilotis neoxenus

Painted redstart, Myioborus pictus

Townsend's solitaire, Myadestes townsendi

Five-striped sparrow, Amphispiza quinquestriata

Rufous-crowned sparrow, Aimophila ruficeps

Plain-capped starthroat, Heliomaster constantii

Vaux's swift, Chaetura vauxi

White-throated swift, Aeronautes saxatalis

Flame-colored tanager, Piranga bidentata

Hepatic tanager, Piranga flava

Red-headed tanager, Piranga erythrocephala

Bridled titmouse, Baeolophus wollweberi

Spotted towhee, Pipilo maculatus

Hutton's vireo, Vireo huttoni

Plumbeous vireo, Vireo plumbeus

Yellow-green vireo, Vireo flavoviridis

Golden-browed warbler, Basileuterus belli

Grace's warbler, Setophaga graciae

Hermit warbler, Setophaga occidentalis

Red warbler, Cardellina ruber

Red-faced warbler, Cardellina rubrifrons

Yellow warbler, Setophaga petechia

Acorn woodpecker, Melanerpes formicivorus

Arizona woodpecker, Picoides arizonae

List of birds of the Sonoran Desert

This list of birds of the Sonoran Desert includes all bird species endemic to the Sonoran Desert, and related areas; (a few species listed are only "native" and have a larger continental range). They are retrieved from the List of birds of Yuma County, Arizona, though not exclusively.

Birds (class: Aves)
Anatomy
Behaviour
Evolution
Fossil birds
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Neornithes

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