List of aircraft of the Royal Australian Air Force

Many aircraft types have served in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) since it was formed in March 1921.[1] This is a list of RAAF aircraft, those types that have served and been retired by the RAAF. It also includes aircraft of the Australian Flying Corps, Australian Air Corps and Australian Air Force. The aircraft are listed in alphabetic order of their RAAF type name, and then in mark order within that type. For the current aircraft of the RAAF, refer to the list of current Royal Australian Air Force aircraft.

RAAF Mirage
An Australian Mirage III-D in 1988

By type

Type Origin Class Role Introduced Retired Total Notes
Avro 504 United Kingdom biplane trainer 1916 132[2] several variants used, including at least 8 504A, 7 504J, and 56 504K
B.E.2a United Kingdom biplane trainer 1914 1918 2[3] operated by Central Flying School as CFS1 and CFS2
B.E.2c United Kingdom biplane reconnaissance 27[4] operated by No. 1 Sqn.
B.E.2e United Kingdom biplane trainer 1920 1 operated by 1, 4, and 7 Sqns.;[4] 1 operated by Central Flying School from 1918 to 1920[3]
Blériot XI France prop trainer 1915 1917 1[3] operated by Central Flying School as CFS6; primarily for ground instruction
Boxkite United Kingdom prop trainer 1913 1917 2[3] one built by Bristol and second ordered but not delivered; another was built in Australia from parts; operated by Central Flying School as CFS3 and CFS8; first military aircraft built in Australia
Boxkite XV United Kingdom prop trainer 1916 1918 2[3] built by Grahame-White Aviation Company; operated by Central Flying School[3]
CA-25 Winjeel Australia prop trainer 1955 1995 62 Production + 2 Prototypes[3] Served as a Central Flying School trainer and then into a FAC (Forward Air Control) role in its final years, replaced by the PAC CT-4A
PAC CT/4 Airtrainer New Zealand prop trainer 1975 1992 51[3] Served as a Central Flying School trainer, Became replaced by contracted BAE Systems CT-4B's, until BAE contract was lost. Civilian use of CT-4As are high.
CA-26 Sabre Australia jet fighter 1956 1957 1 Experimental development of the F-86 Sabre, led to CA-27 Sabre
CA-27 Sabre Mk.30-32 Australia jet fighter 1956 1971 112 license-built by Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation; replaced by the Mirage III
Caudron G.III France biplane trainer 1916 1917 1[3] operated by Central Flying School[3]
Deperdussin Type A France prop trainer 1913 1918 2[3] built by British Deperdussin; operated by Central Flying School as CFS4 and CFS5
DH.1a United Kingdom biplane fighter 1916 1916 1[5] built by Savages; operated by 1 Sqn AFC; returned to UK
DH.5 United Kingdom biplane fighter 1917 78[6] operated by 2 & 6 Sqns AFC
DH.6 United Kingdom biplane trainer 1918 1919 28[3] 2 additional aircraft ordered by Central Flying School but lost at sea during delivery;[3] operated by 5, 7, and 8 Sqns RFC
DH.9A United Kingdom biplane light bomber 1920 1930 31 30 acquired as an imperial gift from the United Kingdom
1 replacement purchased
6 destroyed; 16 scrapped; 9 written-off
assigned RAAF serial prefix A1[7]
DHC-4 Caribou Canada prop airlift 1964 2009 Operated as transport aircraft and STOL Aircraft throughout the Vietnam war and PNG regions
F.2b Fighter United Kingdom biplane fighter 1918 1919 67[8] operated by 1, 3, and 7 Sqns. AFC
F-111C Aardvark United States jet medium-range interdictor/ Tactical Strike 1973 2010 24 Ordered in 1963 to replace the ageing English Electric Canberra Bombers. Delivery not received until 1973, RAAF used leased F-4 Phantoms while the U.S. produced the first F-111Cs
F-111G Aardvark United States jet medium-range interdictor/ Tactical Strike 1992 2007 15 former USAF aircraft, attrition replacements for the F-111C
F.E.2b United Kingdom biplane trainer 1917 1920 1[3] operated by Central Flying School[3]
F.K.3 United Kingdom biplane trainer 1917 1917 4[9] briefly operated by the AFC
Lincoln Mk.30[10] United Kingdom prop bomber 1946 1961
Lincoln Mk.31[10] United Kingdom prop LRN (long Range Navigation Bomber) 1946 1961 "Long Nose" Lincoln was unique to Australian service, featuring a 6' 6" nose extension[10]
Maurice Farman Hydro-Aeroplane France floatplane trainer 1914 1917 1[3] operated by Central Flying School as CFS7[3]
M.F.7 Longhorn France biplane trainer 1916 1918 1[3] operated by Central Flying School as CFS15[3]
M.F.11 Shorthorn France biplane trainer 1916 1919 5[3] operated by Central Flying School[3]
Mirage IIIO(A & F) France
Australia
jet interceptor 1964 1988 100 built by Government Aircraft Factories; replaced by the AF-18A Hornet
Mirage III D France
Australia
jet operational trainer 1964 1988 16 built by Government Aircraft Factories; replaced by the AF-18B Hornet
Scout D United Kingdom biplane utility 1916 1926 1[3] operated by Central Flying School and No. 1 Flying Training School RAAF[3]
UH-1B Iroquois United States helicopter utility transport 1966 1989 replaced by the S-70 Black Hawk
UH-1D Iroquois United States helicopter utility transport 1989 replaced by the S-70 Black Hawk
UH-1H Iroquois United States helicopter utility transport 1989 replaced by the S-70 Black Hawk

Australian Central Flying School 1913-1919

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service Period Notes
Airco DH.6 DH.6 United Kingdom Two-seat primary trainer biplane 1918-1919 Nine aircraft
Avro 504 Avro 504K United Kingdom Two-seat trainer biplane 1919-1920 20 aircraft
Bleriot XI Bleriot XI France Trainer aircraft 1915-1917 One aircraft was donated to the Australian Central Flying School in 1915.
Bristol Boxkite Boxkite United Kingdom Two-seat trainer biplane 1912-1918 Two aircraft
Bristol Scout Scout D United Kingdom Single-seat trainer biplane 1916-1926 One ex-Royal Naval Air Service aircraft
Caudron G.3 G.3 France Two-seat trainer biplane 1916-1918 One aircraft
Deperdussin Type A Type A France Single-seat trainer aircraft 1913-1914 Two aircraft
Grahame-White Type XV Boxkite Type XV Boxkite United Kingdom Two-seat trainer biplane 1916-1918 Two aircraft
Maurice Farman Seaplane Seaplane France Two-seat seaplane 1914-1917 One aircraft
Maurice Farman MF.7 Longhorn MF.7 Shorthorn France Two-seat trainer biplane 1916-1917 One aircraft
Maurice Farman MF.11 Shorthorn MF.11 Shorthorn France Two-seat trainer biplane 1917-1919 Four aircraft
Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2 B.E.2a, B.E.2b United Kingdom Two-seat trainer biplane 1912-1920 Three aircraft
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2 F.E.2b United Kingdom Two-seat trainer biplane 1917-1920 One aircraft was donated to the Australian Central Flying School in 1917.
Sopwith Pup Pup United Kingdom Single-seat fighter trainer biplane 1919-1920 12 aircraft

Australian Flying Corps 1913–1920

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
Airco DH.1 DH.1a United Kingdom Two-seat fighter scout biplane 1916 One aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Squadron
Airco DH.5 DH.5 United Kingdom Single-seat fighter scout biplane 1917-? 68 aircraft. Operated by No. 2 Squadron and No. 6 (Training) Squadron
Airco DH.6 DH.6 United Kingdom Two-seat primary trainer biplane 1917-1918 68 aircraft. Operated by No. No. 5 (Training) Squadron and No. 7 (Training) Squadron
Armstrong Whitworth F.K.3 Little Ark F.K.3 United Kingdom Two-seat trainer, obsolete reconnaissance, light bomber biplane 1917 only Operated by No. 3 squadron
Avro 504 504A
504J
504K
United Kingdom Two-seat elementary trainer biplane 1917-1919 Operated by Nos 5, 6, 7 and 8 Training Squadrons
Bristol F.2 Fighter F.2B Fighter United Kingdom Two-seat reconnaissance, fighter biplane 1916-1918 676 aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Squadron, No. 3 Squadron and No. 7 (Training) Squadron.
Bristol Scout Scout C
Scout D
United Kingdom Single-seat fighter scout, reconnaissance, trainer biplane 1916-? Ten aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Squadron and No. 6 (Training) Squadron
Caudron G.3 G.3 France Two-seat reconnaissance biplane 1915 only Two aircraft. Operated by the Mesopotamian Half Flight
Curtiss JN-4 Jenny JN-4 Jenny United States Two-seat primary trainer biplane 1917-?
Handley Page 0/400 0/400 United Kingdom Three-seat twin-engine heavy bomber biplane 1918 only One aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Squadron in Palestine.
Martinsyde S.1 Scout S.1 Scout United Kingdom Single-seat, reconnaissance, scout biplane 1915-1916 Four aircraft. Operated by the Mesopotamian Half Flight
Martinsyde Elephant G.100 Elephant
G.102 Elephant
United Kingdom Single-seat bomber, reconnaissance, obsolete fighter scout biplane 1916-1918 Operated by No. 1 Squadron in Egypt and Palestine.
Maurice Farman MF.7 Longhorn MF.7 Longhorn France Two-seat reconnaissance biplane 1915 only One aircraft. Operated by the Mesopotamian Half Flight
Maurice Farman MF.11 Shorthorn MF.11 Shorthorn France Two-seat trainer, obsolete reconnaissance, light bomber biplane 1915-1916 23 aircraft. Operated by No. 5 (Training) Squadron and the Mesopotamian Half Flight
Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2 B.E.2c
B.E.2e
United Kingdom Two-seat reconnaissance, artillery spotter, light bomber, trainer biplane 1915-1918 38 aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Squadron in Egypt and Palestine, No. 7 (Training) Squadron in the United Kingdom, plus the Mesopotamian Half Flight.
Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.12 B.E.12
B.E.12a
United Kingdom Single-seat reconnaissance, light bomber, obsolete fighter biplane ?-1919 Nine aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Squadron in Palestine.
Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8 R.E.8 United Kingdom Two-seat reconnaissance, artillery observation, light bomber biplane 1917-1919 Operated by No. 1 Squadron, No. 3 squadron and No. 7 (Training) Squadron
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 SE.5A United Kingdom single-seat fighter scout biplane 1917-1919 158 aircraft. Operated by No. 2 Squadron in France, No.5 (Training) Squadron and No. 6 (Training) Squadron in the United Kingdom.
Sopwith Buffalo 3F.1 Buffalo United Kingdom Two-seat armoured fighter, reconnaissance biplane 1918 One aircraft. Operated by No. 4 Squadron for test and trials.
Sopwith Camel 1F.1 Camel United Kingdom Single-seat fighter scout biplane 1917-1919 186 aircraft. Operated by No. 4 Squadron in France, No. 5 (Training ) Squadron, No. 6 (Training) Squadron and No. 8 (Training) Squadron in the United Kingdom.
Sopwith Pup Pup United Kingdom Single-seat trainer, obsolete fighter-scout biplane 1917-1919 27 aircraft. Operated by Nos 5, 6 and 8 Training Squadrons in the United kingdom.
Sopwith Snipe 7F.1 Snape United Kingdom Single-seat fighter-scout biplane 1919 only 68 aircraft. Operated by No. 4 Squadron in France, No. 6 (Training) Squadron and No. 8 (Training) Squadron in the United Kingdom.
Sopwith 1½ Strutter United Kingdom trainer, obsolete fighter and reconnaissance biplane 1916-1918 Nine aircraft. Operated by No. 6 (Training ) Squadron in the United Kingdom.

Australian Air Corps 1920-1921

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
Airco DH.9 Airco DH.9 United Kingdom Two-seat day bomber, general-purpose biplane 1920-1921 28 Imperial Gift aircraft
Airco DH.9A Airco DH.9A United Kingdom Two-seat day bomber biplane 1920-1921 30 Imperial Gift aircraft
Avro 504 Avro 504K
Avro 504L floatplane
United Kingdom Two-seat trainer biplane 1920-1921 20 aircraft, plus 35 Imperial Gift aircraft
Bristol Scout Scout D United Kingdom 1920-1921 One aircraft
Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2 B.E.2B United Kingdom Two-seat trainer biplane 1920 One aircraft
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2 F.E.2b United Kingdom 1920 one aircraft
Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5 S.E.5A United Kingdom Single-seat fighter biplane 1920-1921 35 Imperial Gift aircraft
Sopwith Pup Pup United Kingdom Single-seat fighter trainer biplane 1920-1921 12 aircraft
Vickers Vimy FB.27A Vimy II United Kingdom Twin-engine heavy bomber biplane 1920-1921 One aircraft, civil registration G-EAOU

Fighters and fighter-bombers

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A2 Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5A S.E.5A United Kingdom Single-seat fighter biplane 1921–1928 35 aircraft. Imperial Gift aircraft
A12 Bristol Bulldog Bulldog Mk IIA United Kingdom Single-seat day and night fighter biplane 1930–1940 Eight aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Squadron RAAF and No. 2 Squadron RAAF.
Gloster Gauntlet Gauntlet Mk II United Kingdom Single-seat day and night fighter biplane 1940 only Six aircraft. Operated by No. 3 Squadron RAAF in Egypt. The RAF variant was the Gauntlet Mk II.
Gloster Gladiator Gladiator Mk II United Kingdom Single-seat fighter biplane 1940–1941 30 aircraft. Operated by No. 3 Squadron RAAF during the 1st Libyan campaigns. The RAF variant was the Gladiator Mk II.
A1 Hawker Demon Demon Mk I
Demon Mk II
United Kingdom Two-seat fighter biplane 1935–1945 64 aircraft.
Boulton Paul Defiant Defiant Mk I
Defiant Mk II
United Kingdom Two-seat night fighter aircraft 1941 only 18 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 456 Squadron RAAF in the United Kingdom. RAF variants were the Defiant Mk I and Mk II.
Curtiss Tomahawk P-40B Tomahawk Mk IIB United States Single-seat fighter bomber aircraft 1941 only Operated by No. 3 Squadron RAAF in the Syrian and 2nd Libyan campaigns. The RAF variant was the Tomahawk Mk IIB.
A60 Hawker Hurricane Hurricane Mk I United Kingdom Single-seat fighter aircraft 1941, 1942–1946 Only one aircraft served with the RAAF in Australia. Operated by No. 3 Squadron RAAF, No. 450 Squadron RAAF and No. 451 Squadron RAAF in North Africa. RAF variants were the Hurricane Mk I, Mk II, Mk IIB and Mk IIC.
A58 Supermarine Spitfire Spitfire F Mk VC
Spitfire F Mk VIII
Spitfire HF Mk VIII
Spitfire LF Mk VIII
United Kingdom Single-seat fighter aircraft 1941–1945 928 plus aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by Nos 451, 452, 453 and 457 Australian squadrons. RAF variants were the Spitfire Mk I, Mk IIA, Mk VB, Mk VC, Mk VIII, Mk IX, Mk IXB, Mk IXE, LF Mk XIV, LF MK XVI, F Mk 14.
A51 Brewster Buffalo Buffalo Mk I United States Single-seat fighter aircraft 1941–1943 63 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 21 Squadron RAAF and No. 453 Squadron RAAF.
A53 Bell Airacobra P-39D Aeracobra
P-39F Airacobra
P-400 Airacobra Mk I
United States Single-seat fighter aircraft 1942–1943 22 aircraft. Loaned to the RAAF by the USAAF.
A8 DAP/Bristol Beaufighter Beaufighter Mk 21 United Kingdom
Australia
Two-seat twin-engine strike fighter aircraft 1942–1957 581 aircraft
A19 Bristol Beaufighter Beaufighter MK IC
Beaufigther Mk VIC
Beaufigther TF Mk X
Beaufigther Mk XIC
United Kingdom Two-seat twin-engine strike fighter aircraft RAF aircraft were operated by No. 455 Squadron RAAF and No. 456 Squadron RAAF. RAF variants were the Beaufighter Mk IIF, Mk VI and TF Mk X.
A29 Curtiss Kittyhawk P-40E Kittyhawk Mk IA
P-40K Kittyhawk Mk III
P-40M Kittyhawk Mk III
P-40N Kittyhawk Mk VI
United States Single-seat fighter-bomber aircraft 1942–1947 848 plus aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 3 Squadron RAAF and No. 450 Squadron RAAF. RAF variants were the Kittyhawk Mk I, Mk II, Mk IIA, Mk III and Mk IV.
A46 CAC Boomerang CA-12 Boomerang Mk I
CA-13 Boomerang Mk II
CA-14 Boomerang
CA-14A prototype
CA-19 Boomerang
Australia Single-seat interceptor, ground-attack fighter aircraft 1942–1946 250 aircraft
A52 De Havilland Mosquito Mosquito F MK II
Mosquito T Mk III
Mosquito FB Mk VI
Mosquito PR Mk XVI
Mosquito FB Mk 40
Mosquito PR Mk 40
Mosquito PR Mk 41
Mosquito T Mk 43
United Kingdom
Australia
Twin-engine two-seat long-range high-altitude fighter bomber, photographic reconnaissance aircraft 1942–1954 285 plus aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 456 Squadron RAAF and No. 464 Squadron RAAF. RAF variants were the Mosquito NF Mk II, T Mk III, FB Mk VI, NF Mk XVII and NF Mk 30.
A68 North American Mustang P-51D Mustang
P-51K Mustang
CA-17 Mustang Mk 20
CA-18 Mustang Mk 21
CA-18 Mustang PR Mk 22
CA-18 Mustang Mk 23
United States
Australia
Single-seat long-range fighter aircraft 1944–1960 499 plus aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 3 Squadron RAAF and No. 450 Squadron RAAF between 1944 and 1945. RAF variants were the Mustang Mk III, Mk IV and Mk IVA.
A78 De Havilland Vampire Vampire F Mk 1
Vampire F Mk 2
Vampire FB Mk 5
United Kingdom Single-seat fight, fighter bomber aircraft 1948-1957 Three aircraft
A79 De Havilland Vampire Vampire F MK 30
Vampire FB Mk 31
Vampire T Mk 33
Vampire TMk 34
Vampire T Mk 34A
Vampire T Mk 35
Vampire T Mk 35A
United Kingdom
Australia
Single-seat fighter, fighter bomber aircraft 1949–1970 193 aircraft
A77 Gloster Meteor Meteor F Mk 3
Meteor F Mk 8
Meteor NF MK 11
Meteor T Mk 7
Meteor U Mk 21A
United Kingdom Single-seat interceptor, ground attack fighter aircraft 1946–1947, 1951–1963 111 aircraft
A94 CAC/North American Sabre CA-26 Prototype
CA-27 Sabre Mk 30
CA-27 Sabre Mk 31
CA-27 Sabre Mk 32
United States
Australia
Single-seat jet fighter aircraft 1954–1971 112 aircraft
A3 GAF/Dassault Mirage III Mirage IIID
Mirage IIIO(A)
Mirage IIIO(F)
France
Australia
Single-seat interceptor fighter, ground-attack fighter-bomber aircraft 1964–1988 116 aircraft
A21 GAF/McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet F/A-18A Hornet
F/A-18B Hornet
United States
Australia
Single-seat multi-role fighter-attack aircraft 1985–present 75 aircraft. See McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet in Australian service
A44 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet F/A-18F Super Hornet United States Two-seat multi-role fighter-attack aircraft 2010–present
A35 Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II F-35A United States single-seat multi-role fighter aircraft 2014–present
A46 Boeing EA-18G Growler EF-18A Growler United States Two-seat electronic warfare aircraft 2015–present

Bombers

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A6 Airco DH.9 DH.9 United Kingdom Two-seat day bomber, general-purpose biplane 1921–1930 28 aircraft. Imperial Gift aircraft
A1 Airco DH.9A DH.9A United Kingdom Two-seat day bomber biplane 1921-1929 30 aircraft
A5 Vickers Vimy FB.27A Vimy II United Kingdom Twin-engine heavy bomber 1921-? One aircraft
A5 Westland Wapiti Wapiti Mk IA
Wapiti Mk IIA
United Kingdom Two-seat general-purpose, light bomber biplane 1929–1943 44 aircraft. Used as trainer and target tug aircraft.
A16 Lockheed Hudson Hudson Mk I
Hudson Mk II
Hudson Mk IIIA
Hudson IV
Hudson Mk IVA
United States Twin-engine general reconnaissance bomber aircraft, with a crew of five 1940–1948 RAF aircraft were operated by No. 8 Squadron RAAF and No. 459 Squadron RAAF. RAF variants were the Hudson Mk III, Mk IIIA, Mk V and Mk VI
A9 DAP/Bristol Beaufort Beaufort Mk V
Beaufort Mk VA
Beaufort Mk VI
Beaufort Mk VII
Beaufort Mk VIII
Beaufort Mk IX
United Kingdom
Australia
Twin-engine torpedo bomber aircraft, with a crew of four 1941–1946 701 aircraft
A27 Vultee Vengeance Vengeance Mk I
Vengeance Mk IA
Vengeance Mk II
Vengeance Mk IV
United States Two-seat dive bomber aircraft 1942–1946 342 aircraft. See Vultee Vengeance in Australian service
A28 Douglas Boston DB-7B Boston Mk III
A-20A Boston
A-20C Boston
A-20G Boston
United States Twin-engine light attack bomber aircraft, with a crew of three 1942–1945 69 aircraft
Vickers Wellington Wellington Mk IC
Wellington Mk III
Wellington Mk IV
Wellington Mk VIII
Wellington Mk X
Wellington Mk XI
Wellington Mk XII
Wellington Mk XIII
Wellington Mk XIV
United Kingdom Twin-engine long-range medium bomber aircraft, with a crew of six 1941–1945 71 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by Nos 458, 460 and 466 Australian Squadrons. RAF variants were the Wellington Mk IC, Mk III, Mk IV, Mk VIII, Mk X, Mk XI, Mk XIII and Mk XIV
Handley Page Hampden Hampden Mk I
Hampden TB Mk I
United Kingdom Four-seat twin-engine medium bomber, torpedo bomber 1941–1942 70 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 455 Squadron RAAF. RAF variants were the Hampden Mk I and TB Mk I.
Bristol Blenheim Blenheim Mk I
Blenheim Mk IV
Blenheim Mk V
United Kingdom Three-seat twin-engine light bomber aircraft 1942–1943 RAF aircraft were operated by No. 454 Squadron RAAF and No. 459 Squadron RAAF in the Mediterranean.
Handley Page Halifax Halifax Mk II
Halifax Mk III
United Kingdom Four-engine heavy bomber aircraft, with a crew of seven 1942–1945 300 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by Nos 460, 462 and 466 Australian squadrons. RAF variants were the Halifax Mk II, Mk III and VI
A59 Lockheed Ventura RB-34A Ventura
PV-1 Ventura
United States Twin-engine general reconnaissance bomber aircraft, with a crew of five 1942–1946 92 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 459 Squadron RAAF and No. 464 Squadron RAAF from 1942 to 1943. RAF variants were the Ventura Mk I, Mk II and Mk V.
Martin Baltimore Baltimore Mk III
Baltimore Mk IIIA
Baltimore Mk IV
Baltimore Mk V
United States Four-seat twin-engine light, medium bomber aircraft 1943–1945 71 plus aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 454 Squadron RAAF and No. 459 Squadron RAAF. RAF variants were the Baltimore Mk III, Mk IIIA, Mk IV and Mk V
A47 North American Mitchell B-25D Mitchell
B-25J Mitchell Mk III
United States Twin-engine medium bomber aircraft, with a crew of 5 or 6 1942–1946 50 aircraft
Avro Manchester Manchester Mk I United Kingdom Twin-engine heavy bomber aircraft 1942 only Operated by No. 460 Squadron RAAF. The RAF variant was the Manchester Mk I.
A66 Avro Lancaster Lancaster B Mk I United Kingdom Four-engine heavy bomber aircraft, with a crew of seven 1942–1946 83 plus aircraft. Only two aircraft served with the RAAF in Australia. RAF aircraft were operated by Nos 460, 463 and 467 Australian squadrons. The RAF variants were the Lancaster Mk I and Mk III. See G for George
A72 Consolidated Liberator B-24D Liberator
B-24J Liberator
B-24L Liberator
B-24M Liberator
United States Four-engine heavy bomber aircraft 1944–1948 277 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 466 Squadron RAAF and No. 467 Squadron RAAF in 1945. See B-24 Liberators in Australian service
A73 GAF/Avro Lincoln Lincoln Mk 30
Lincoln Mk 30A
Lincoln GR Mk 31
Lincoln MR Mk 31
United Kingdom
Australia
Four-engine long-range heavy bomber aircraft, with a crew of seven 1946–1961 73 aircraft
A84 GAF/English Electric Canberra Canberra B Mk 2
Canberra Mk 20
Canberra Mk 21
Canberra T Mk 4
United Kingdom
Australia
Twin-engine tactical bomber aircraft 1951–1982 55 aircraft
A69 McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II F-4E Phantom II United States Two-seat ground attack fighter-bomber, air superiority fighter aircraft 1970–1973 24 aircraft. See McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II in Australian service
A8 General Dynamics F-111C Aardvark F-111A Aardvark
F-111C Aardvark
F-111G Aardvark
RF-111C Aardvark
United States Two-seat long-range tactical strike, interdictor, reconnaissance aircraft 1973–2010 43 aircraft

Maritime Reconnaissance

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A10 Fairey IIID Fairey IIID United Kingdom Three-seat spotter-reconnaissance, survey seaplane 1921-1928 RAAF on behalf of the RAN. Six aircraft
A9 Supermarine Seagull Seagull Mk III United Kingdom Three-seat spotter-reconnaissance, survey amphibian aircraft 1926-1936 RAAF on behalf of the RAN. Nine aircraft
A11 Supermarine Southampton Southampton Mk I United Kingdom General reconnaissance flying boat aircraft, with a crew of five 1928–1939 Two aircraft
A2 Supermarine Walrus/Seagull V Seagull Mk V
Walrus Mk I
Walrus Mk III
United Kingdom Three-seat air/sea rescue, maritime patrol amphibian aircraft 1935-1947 RAAF on behalf of the RAN. 61 aircraft
A18 Short S.23 Empire S.23 C Class Empire Flying Boat United Kingdom Four-engine 24-passenger flying boat airliner 1939-1943 Five aircraft. Impressed into RAAF service for transport and air-ambulance duties in 1939. See Qantas fleet history.
Short S.26 G Class Flying Boat S.26/M G Class Flying Boat United Kingdom Four-engine 38-passenger flying boat airliner 1941 only Three aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 10 Squadron RAAF
A26 Short Sunderland Sunderland Mk I United Kingdom Four-engine general-reconnaissance flying boat aircraft, with a crew of 13. 1939–1946 146 aircraft. RAF aircraft were operated by No. 10 Squadron RAAF and No. 461 Squadron RAAF. RAF variants were the Sunderland Mk I, Mk II, Mk III and Mk V.
A24 Consolidated Catalina PBY-4 Catalina
PBY-5 Catalina
PBY-5A Catalina
PB2B-1 Catalina
PB2B-2 Catalina
United States Twin-engine general reconnaissance flying-boat aircraft, with a crew of 8 or 9. 1940–1950 168 aircraft. See Consolidated PBY Catalina in Australian service
Fairey Swordfish Swordfish Mk I United States Three-seat torpedo-bomber, reconnaissance, anti-submarine biplane 1942 only Six aircraft. Used by No. 25 Squadron RAAF in Western Australia.
A48 Vought Kingfisher OS2U-3 Kingfisher United States Two-seat reconnaissance aircraft 1942–1948 18 aircraft
A89 Lockheed Neptune P2V-4 Neptune
P2V-5 (P-2E) Neptune
P2V-7 (SP-2H) Neptune
United States Twin-engine maritime reconnaissance, patrol and anti-submarine aircraft 1951–1977 24 aircraft
A9 Lockheed P-3 Orion P-3B Orion
P-3C Orion
AP-3C Orion
TAP-3B Orion
United States Four-engine maritime patrol aircraft 1968–present 31 aircraft
A9 Lockheed AP-3C Orion AP-3C Orion United States Four-engine maritime patrol aircraft 2002–present
A47 Boeing P-8 Poseidon P-8A Poseidon United States 2016–present

Army Cooperation

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
Hawker Audax Audax United Kingdom Two-seat army co-operation, communications biplane 1940–1941 Used by Australian squadrons in North Africa.
Westland Lysander Lysander Mk I
Lysander Mk II
United Kingdom Two-seat army co-operation, communications aircraft 1940 Used by No. 3 Squadron RAAF in Egypt. Six aircraft
Piper Cub L-4 Grasshopper United States Two-seat light observation, communications aircraft 1943–1944 Borrowed from the USAAF, used by No. 4 Squadron RAAF in New Guinea. Two aircraft?
A11 Taylorcraft Auster AOP Auster Mk III
Auster Mk V
Auster AOP.6
United Kingdom Two-seat Air Observation Post, communications aircraft 1944–1959 58 aircraft
Stinson Sentinel L-5 Sentinel United States Two-seat light observation, communications aircraft 1944-1946 One aircraft was borrowed from the USAAF in 1944.
A98 Cessna 180 Cessna 180A
Cessna 180D
Cessna 180E
United States Two to four-seat observation, communications aircraft 1959–1964 Transferred to the Army in 1964. 15 aircraft

Trainers

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
Bristol Scout D Scout D United Kingdom 1921-1926 One aircraft
A3 Avro 504 Avro 504K
Avro 504L floatplane
United Kingdom
Australia
Two-seat trainer biplane 1922–1928 61 aircraft. Imperial Gift aircraft
A4 Sopwith Pup Pup United Kingdom Single-seat fighter trainer biplane 1922–1925 11 aircraft used as fighter trainers
A7 De Havilland Cirrus Moth D.H.60 Cirrus I Moth
D.H.60X Cirrus Moth
United Kingdom Two-seat elementary trainer biplane 1926–1935 34 aircraft
A7 De Havilland Gipsy Moth D.H.60G Gipsy Moth
D.H.60G-III Moth Major
D.H.60M (Metal) Moth
United Kingdom
Australia
Two-seat elementary trainer biplane 1930–1946 98 aircraft
A6 Avro Cadet Cadet Mk II United Kingdom Two-seat intermediate trainer biplane 1935–1945 34 aircraft
A25 Airspeed Oxford Oxford Mk I
Oxford Mk II
United Kingdom Twin-engine three-seat advanced trainer aircraft 1940–1953 391 aircraft
A34 de Havilland Dragon DH.84 Dragon Mk I
DH.84 Dragon Mk II
DH.84 Dragon III
United Kingdom
Australia
Twin-engine six or eight passenger feeder airliner biplane 1940–1945 98 aircraft. Built and impressed for trainer and communications duties with the RAAF.
A4 Avro Anson Anson GR Mk I
Anson Mk XII
Anson Mk XIV
Anson T Mk I
United Kingdom Twin-engine general reconnaissance bomber, trainer aircraft 1937–1955 1020 aircraft
A20 CAC Wirraway CA-1 Wirraway
CA-3 Wirraway
CA-5 Wirraway
CA-7 Wirraway
CA-8 Wirraway
CA-9 Wirraway
CA-16 Wirraway
Australia Two-seat trainer, general purpose aircraft 1939–1958 755 aircraft
A17 De Havilland Tiger Moth DH.82A Tiger Moth United Kingdom
Australia
Two-seat elementary trainer biplane 1940–1957 885 aircraft
A21 De Havilland Moth Minor DH.94 Moth Minor United Kingdom
Australia
Two-seat elementary trainer aircraft 1940–1945 42 aircraft used in the Empire Air Training Scheme.
A35 Douglas Dolphin United States Twin-engine eight-seat amphibian aircraft 1940–1944 Four civilian aircraft were impressed into RAAF service in 1940.
A22 Fairey Battle United Kingdom Three-seat light bomber aircraft 1940–1949 Obsolete bomber aircraft. 366 aircraft used in the Empire Air Training Scheme.
A3 CAC Wackett Trainer CA-2 Prototypes
CA-6 Wackett Trainer
Australia Two-seat intermediate trainer aircraft 1940–1946 202 aircraft
A50 Ryan STM Ryan STM-2 United States Two-seat primary trainer aircraft 1942–1945 34 aircraft
A85 CAC Winjeel CA-22 prototype
CA-25 Winjeel
Australia Two or three-seat basic trainer aircraft 1951–1994 64 aircraft
A10 Hawker Siddeley HS.748 HS 748 Series 2 United Kingdom Twin-engine navigation trainer aircraft 1966–2004 Ten aircraft
A7 CAC/Macchi MB-326H CAC CA-30, MB-326H Italy
Australia
Two-seat basic and advanced jet trainer aircraft 1968–2001 87 aircraft
A19 PAC CT/4 Airtrainer CT/4A Airtrainer New Zealand Two-seat primary trainer aircraft 1975–1992 51 aircraft
A23 Pilatus PC-9 PC-9/A Switzerland
Australia
Two-seat advanced pilot trainer, aerobatics, forward air control aircraft 1987–present 67 aircraft
A32 Beechcraft Super King Air (RAAF) United States Twin-engine navigation, specialised trainer aircraft B200 1997–2003, B350 2003–present
A27 BAe Hawk 127 Hawk 127 United Kingdom
Australia
Two-seat advanced jet trainer, lead-in fighter trainer, light attack fighter aircraft 2000–present 33 aircraft
A54 Pilatus PC-21 PC-21 Switzerland Two-set pilot trainer aircraft 2016–present

Helicopters

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A80 Sikorsky S-51 Dragonfly S-51 Dragonfly United States Four-seat communications, casualty evacuation helicopter 1947–1964 Three helicopters.
A91 Bristol Sycamore Sycamore Mk 3
Sycamore Mk 14
United Kingdom Two to five seat general-purpose helicopter 1951–1965 Used for general support duties at the Woomera Rocket Range in South Australia. Two helicopters.
A2 Bell UH-1 Iroquois UH-1B Iroquois
UH-1D Iroquois
UH-1H Iroquois
United States Multi-role utility transport helicopter 1962–1990 66 helicopters. Transferred to the Australian Army in 1990.
A1 Bell 47 Sioux Bell 47G-3B-1 Sioux
Bell 47G-2 Sioux
Bell 47G-2A Sioux
United States Three-seat utility and training helicopter 1961-1965 31 helicopters. Transferred to the Australian Army in 1965.
A5 Aerospatiale Alouette III SA.316B Alouette III France Seven-seat general-purpose helicopter 1964–1966 Three helicopters. Used for general support duties at the Woomera Rocket Range in South Australia.
A15 Boeing CH-47 Chinook CH-47C Chinook United States Twin-rotor medium-lift transport helicopter 1974–1989 12 helicopters. Transferred to the Australian Army in 1989. See Boeing CH-47 Chinook in Australian service
A22 Aerospatiale AS.350B Squirrel AS.350B Squirrel France Two-crew light utility helicopter 1984–1990 18 helicopters. Transferred to the Australian Defence Force Helicopter School in 1990.
A25 Sikorsky S-70A Blackhawk S-70A-9 Blackhawk United States Multi-role battlefield transport helicopter, with a crew of four and capable of carrying 10 troops 1988–1989 8 UH-60L (S-70A-9), transferred to Australian Army in 1989.

Reconnaissance and intelligence

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A56 Republic Lancer P-43A Lancer United States Single-seat fighter, photographic reconnaissance aircraft 1942–1943 Eight P-43A-1 Lancer's were provided for service with the No. 1 Photographic Reconnaissance Unit. Three were written off in accidents, with the rest returned to the United States Army Air Forces in 1943.
A51 Brewster F2A Buffalo United States 1942–1944 Five Brewster F2A Buffalo's were provided for service with the No. 1 Photographic Reconnaissance Unit. Four were written off and the remaining aircraft was returned to the United States Army Air Forces in 1944.
A55 Lockheed Lightning P-38E Lightning United States Single-seat twin-engine long-range high-altitude fighter, photographic reconnaissance aircraft 1942–1944 Three P-38E's were transferred from the United States Army Air Forces for service with No. 1 Photographic Reconnaissance Unit. All three were written off in accidents.
A20 CAC Wirraway Australia Served with the No. 87 (Photo Reconnaissance) Squadron
A52 de Havilland Mosquito Mosquito PR Mk 40
Mosquito PR Mk 41
United Kingdom
Australia
Twin-engine long-range high-altitude photographic reconnaissance aircraft British and Australian built de Havilland Mosquito's served in the Photographic Reconnaissance role.
A8 General Dynamics F-111C RF-111C United States Two-seat long-range reconnaissance aircraft 1973–2010 Four aircraft were purchased.
A3 Dassualt Mirage IIIO(A) Reconnaissance (R) France Single-seat reconnaissance aircraft 1969-1988 Reconnaissance noses were fitted to several Mirage aircraft to serve as photography aircraft.
Gates Learjet United States 1982–1987 Used by the Survey Flight of No. 6 Squadron RAAF. Eight aircraft were leased to the RAAF.
A30 Boeing 737 AEW&C E-7A Wedgetail United States Twin-engine airborne early warning and control aircraft 2009–present

Liaison/Communications

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A8 de Havilland DH.50A DH-50A United Kingdom Four-seat communications biplane 1926–1929 One aircraft
A10 de Havilland DH.50A DH.50A United Kingdom Four-seat communications biplane 1943-1945 One aircraft was impressed into military service with the RAAF in 1943.
A36 Fairchild 24 Fairchuild 24G
Fairchild 24R
United States Four-seat communications aircraft 1940–1946 Four civilian aircraft were impressed into RAAF service in 1940.
A37 Miles Aircraft Miles Falcon Six
Falcon Major
Miles Hawk Major
Miles Merlin
United Kingdom Communications aircraft 1940–1945 Six civilian aircraft were impressed into RAAF service in 1940.
A32 Percival Vega Gull United Kingdom Four-seat sports aircraft 1940–1946 Two civilian aircraft were impressed into RAAF service in 1940.
A38 Stinson Reliant SR-8B Reliant United States Five-seat communications aircraft 1941–1945 One civilian aircraft was impressed into RAAF service in 1941.
A39 Beech 17 Staggerwing United States Four-seat communications aircraft 1941–1947 Three civilian aircraft were impressed into RAAF service in 1941.
A40 Cessna Airmaster C-34 Airmaster United States Four-seat communications aircraft 1941–1945 One civilian aircraft was impressed into RAAF service in 1941.
A42 Lockheed Vega Vega DL-1A United States Six-seat light transport aircraft 1941–1944 One civilian aircraft was impressed into RAAF service in 1941.
A44 Junkers Aircraft Junkers G 31
Junkers W.34d
Junkers W.34f
Germany Utility transport aircraft 1942–1943 Three civilian aircraft were impressed into RAAF service in 1942.
A54 Waco YQC-6 YQC-6 United States Five-seat cabin biplane 1942–1944 One aircraft. Impressed for communications duties with the RAAF in 1942.
A71 Noorduyn Norseman UC-61A Norseman Mk VI Canada Ten-seat utility transport aircraft 1943–1946 14 aircraft
A90 Percival Prince Prince Mk III United Kingdom Twin-engine eight-passenger light transport aircraft 1952–1957 Three aircraft were used at the Long Range Weapons Establishment, Woomera, South Australia.

Transport and utility

Type Variant Origin Role Dates in Service Notes
A3 de Havilland Dragon Rapide DH.89 Dragon Rapide United Kingdom Twin-engine aerial survey biplane 1935–1938 One aircraft. Used by the RAAF in the 1930s for aerial surveying.
A33 de Havilland Dragon Rapide DH.89 Dragon Rapide United Kingdom Twin-engine eight or nine seat passenger airliner biplane 1940-1944 Seven aircraft. Impressed into RAAF service for training and communications duties in 1940.
A14 Wackett / Tugan Gannet Australia Twin-engine seven-seat transport, photographic survey, air ambulance aircraft 1935–1946 Six aircraft
A31 de Havilland Express DH.86A Express
DH.86B Express
United Kingdom Four-engine ten-seat transport biplane 1939–1945 Eight aircraft. Operated by No. 1 Air Ambulance Unit RAAF in the Mediterranean.
A41 de Havilland Fox Moth DH.83 Fox Moth United Kingdom Five-seat light transport biplane 1941–1945 Four aircraft
Bristol Bombay Bombay Mk I United Kingdom Twin-engine medium bomber, troop transport aircraft 1942–1944 RAF aircraft were operated by No. 1 Air Ambulance Unit RAAF. Nine aircraft
A43 de Havilland Dragonfly DH.90 United Kingdom Twin-engine five-seat light transport biplane 1942 only One aircraft
A57 De Havilland Australia DHA-G2 Glider DHA-G2 Glider
DHA-EG1 Glider prototype
Australia Seven-seat transport glider 1942–1950 Eight aircraft
A49 Dornier Do 24 Dornier Do 24K Germany Three-engine reconnaissance, transport flying boat aircraft 1942–1944 Six aircraft
Grumman Goose G-21A Goose Mk I United States 1942 only RAF aircraft were operated by No. 1 Air Ambulance Unit RAAF. One aircraft
A61 Northrop Delta Delta 1D-5 United States Eight-seat cabin aircraft 1942–1944 One civilian aircraft was impressed into RAAF service in 1942.
A45 Ford Trimotor 5-AT-C Trimotor
5-AT-E Trimotor
United States Three-engine 14 to 15 passenger transport, air ambulance aircraft 1942–1943 Two aircraft
A67 Lockheed Lodestar C-60 Lodestar
C-60A Lodestar
United States Twin-engine military transport, air ambulance aircraft, with a crew of three and capable of carrying fourteen passengers 1943–1947 Ten aircraft
A30 Douglas DC-2 Douglas DC-2 United States Twin-engine 14 passenger medium transport aircraft 1940–1947 14 aircraft
A30 Douglas DC-3 Douglas DC-3 United States Twin-engine passenger transport aircraft 1939–1940 Four aircraft
A65 Douglas C-47 Dakota C-47 Dakota
C-47A Dakota
C-47B Dakota
C-49
C-50
C-53 Skytrooper
United States Twin-engine military transport aircraft, with a crew of three or four and capable of carrying 27 passengers 1943–1999 RAAF 124 aircraft
A70 Martin Mariner PBM-3R Mariner United States Twin-engine long-range transport flying boat aircraft 1943–1946 12 aircraft
A74 Avro York York C Mk 1 United Kingdom Four-engine long-range VIP transport aircraft, with a crew of five to seven 1945–1947 One aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A75 Percival Proctor Proctor IV United Kingdom Four-seat communications aircraft 1945–1947 One aircraft
A82 Vickers VC.1 Viking Viking C Mk 2 United Kingdom Twin-engine medium transport aircraft 1947–1951 One aircraft
A81 Bristol Freighter Freighter Mk 21 United Kingdom Twin-engine convertible passenger / freighter transport aircraft 1949–1967 Four aircraft
A95 De Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver DHC-2 Beaver Canada Seven-seat utility transport aircraft 1955–1964 Five aircraft
A96 Convair 440 Metropolitan CV-440 Metropolitan United States Twin-engine medium-range VIP transport aircraft 1956–1968 Two aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A97 Lockheed C-130 Hercules C-130A Hercules
C-130E Hercules
C-130H Hercules
United States Four-engine medium-range, tactical transport aircraft, with a crew of four or five. 1958–present 36 aircraft. See Lockheed C-130 Hercules in Australian service
A100 De Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter DHC-3 Otter Canada 14-seat utility transport aircraft 1961–1967 Two aircraft
A4 De Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou DHC-4 Caribou Canada Twin-engine light tactical transport aircraft, with a crew of two and capable of carrying 22 troops 1964–2009 28 aircraft
A6 Vickers Viscount Viscount Model 720
Viscount Model 756
United Kingdom Four-engine VIP transport aircraft 1964–1969 Two aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A12 BAC One-Eleven BAC One-Eleven 217EA United Kingdom Twin-engine 28-seat VIP transport aircraft 1967–1990 Two aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A10 Hawker Siddeley HS 748 HS.478 Series 2 United Kingdom Twin-engine light VIP transport aircraft 1966–2004 Two aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A11 Dassault Falcon 20 Mystere 20C
Falcon 20c
France Twin-engine eight-passenger short-range VIP transport aircraft 1967–1989 Three aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A18 GAF Nomad Nomad N24A
Nomad N.22B
Australia Twin-engine utility transport, reconnaissance aircraft, with a crew of two and capable of carrying 11 passengers RAAF 1989–1993 RAAF three aircraft
A20 Boeing 707 Boeing 707-368C
Boeing 707-338C
United States Four-engine air-to-air refueling tanker, long-range transport aircraft 1979–2008 Eight aircraft. See Qantas fleet history
A26 Dassault Falcon 900 Falcon 900 France Three-engine 15-passenger VIP transport aircraft 1989–2003 Five aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A32 Beechcraft Super King Air (Army, RAAF) United States Twin-engine utility, light transport aircraft B200/B200C 1997–2006
B350 2004– (RAAF from 2009)
Australian Army 24 aircraft.
A97 Lockheed Martin C-130J Super Hercules C-130J Super Hercules United States Four-engine medium-range, tactical transport aircraft 1999–present 12 aircraft
A36 Boeing Business Jet/737 737 Boeing Business Jet United States Twin-engine special purpose passenger, VIP transport aircraft 2002–present Two aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A37 Bombardier Challenger 604 604 Challenger Canada Twin-engine special purpose passenger, VIP transport aircraft 2002–present Three aircraft. See Royal Australian Air Force VIP aircraft
A41 Boeing C-17 Globemaster III C-17A Globemaster III United States Four-engine heavy transport aircraft 2006–present Eight aircraft. See Boeing C-17 Globemaster III in Australian service
A39 Airbus A330 MRTT/KC-30A KC-30A Multi Role Tanker Transport France Twin-engine air-to-air refueling tanker, long-range transport aircraft 2011–present
A34 Alenia C-27J Spartan C-27A Spartan Italy Twin-engine battlefield airlifter aircraft 2015–present

Prototypes

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A27 AAC Wamira Australia Military trainer Zero aircraft, none were built. Abandoned military aircraft project. Cancelled in 1986.
Avro 707 Type 707A United Kingdom single-seat delta-wing research aircraft 1956 WD280 is housed at the RAAF Museum in Point Cook, Victoria. One aircraft.
A99 BAC Jet Provost Jet Provost T Mk 2 United Kingdom Two-sea basic jet trainer aircraft 1959 One aircraft. Used for tests and trials by the RAAF.
A76 Boeing Washington Washington B Mk 1 United States Four-engine long-range bomber aircraft, with a crew of ten 1952-1956 Two aircraft. Used for weapons trials at the Long Range Weapons Establishment, Woomera, South Australia. The Washington was the British name for the B-29 Superfortress.
A23 CAC CA-11 Woomera CA-4 Woomera
CA-11 Woomera
Australia Three-seat strike reconnaissance and dive-bomber aircraft 1942–1946 Two aircraft.
A62 CAC CA-15 Kangaroo CA-15 Kangaroo Australia Single-seat interceptor fighter aircraft 1946–1950 One aircraft
CAC CA-23 Australia Zero aircraft, none were built. Abandoned military aircraft project
A69 Curtiss Shrike A-25A Shrike United States Two-seat dive bomber aircraft 1943-1944 Ten aircraft
A83 De Havilland Sea Hornet Sea Hornet F Mk 20 United Kingdom Single-seat twin-engine carrier-borne strike fighter aircraft 1948-1950 One aircraft. Acquired for tests and trials.
De Havilland Australia DHA-3 Drover Drover Mk 1 Australia Three-engine eight-seat utility transport aircraft 1948-1949 One aircraft (VH-DHA). Operated by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit RAAF
De Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk Canada Two-seat primary trainer aircraft 1948-1949 One aircraft (VH-BFT). Operated by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit RAAF
A93 GAF Pika Pika Australia Single-seat research aircraft, piloted target drone 1950–1954 Two aircraft. Manned prototypes of the proposed GAF Jindivik target drone.
A86 Hawker P.1081 Hawker P.1081 United Kingdom Single-seat experimental jet fighter aircraft 1950-1951 One aircraft. 75 aircraft were ordered by the RAAF in 1950, but the order was cancelled in 1951.
Hawker Typhoon Typhoon Mk IB United Kingdom Single-seat fighter-bomber, ground attack aircraft 1943 Three RAF aircraft were operated by No. 451 Squadron RAAF. Used for tests and trials.
A15 Miles Magister M.14A Magister United Kingdom Two-seat trainer aircraft 1938-1940 One aircraft. Acquired for tests and trials.
Vickers Valiant Valiant B Mk 1 United Kingdom Four-engine long-range bomber aircraft 1956-1957 Two aircraft. Two RAF jet bombers were used at the Long Range Weapons Establishment, Woomera, South Australia.
Wackett Widgeon Widgeon Mk I
Widgeon Mk II
Australia Single-engine amphibious biplane 1927–1933 Two aircraft
Wackett Warrigal Warrigal Mk I
Warrigal Mk II
Australia Two-seat trainer biplane 1927–1933 Two built

Captured enemy aircraft

World War I

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
Albatros D.Va Germany One captured German aircraft, on display at Australian War Memorial in Canberra, ACT, Australia.
Halberstadt CL.II Germany One captured German aircraft.
Pfalz D.III Germany One captured German aircraft, on display at Australian War Memorial in Canberra, ACT, Australia.

World War II

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
Breda Ba.25 Ba.25 Seaplane Italy 1943 One aircraft. Captured by No. 3 Squadron RAAF at Augusta, Sicily, Italy in September 1943. Later handed over to the Free French.
Caproni Ca.100 Italy
Caproni Ca.309 Ghibli Italy
Fiat CR.42 CR.42 Falco Italy Captured in January 1941 at Martuba
Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Germany
Macchi MC.205 MC.205V Veltro Italy 1943 This aircraft was captured by the Australians, at the Pachion Airfield in Sicily, Italy in the summer of 1943.
Messerschmitt Bf 109 Bf 109 G-6 Germany Bf 109 G-6 is on display at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. It is the last example to retain its original wartime camouflage and markings.
Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet Me 163B Komet Germany One captured Luftwaffe aircraft, shipped to Australia from the United Kingdom immediately after the Second World War, on display at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, ACT, Australia. Me 163B, Werknummer 191907, this aircraft was also part of JG 400 and captured at Husum.
Messerschmitt Me 262 Me 262-2a Schwalbe Germany One captured Luftwaffe aircraft, Me 262 A-2a W.Nr.500200 "Black X 9K+XK", 2 Staffel./KG 51, shipped to Australia from the United Kingdom immediately after the Second World War, on display at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, ACT, Australia.
Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero Japan
Mitsubishi Ki-21 Japan
Mitsubishi Ki-51 Japan
Tachikawa Ki-54 Japan

Drones/RAV

Aircraft type Variant Origin Role Service period Notes
A92 GAF Jindivik Jindivik Mk I
Jindivik Mk 2
Jindivik Mk 2B
Jindivik Mk 102
Jindivik Mk 3
Jindivik Mk 3A
Australia Radio controlled pilotless target drone 1952–1986, 1997 Name is from an Aboriginal Australian word meaning the hunted one
IAI Heron Israel ISR MALE UAV 2009–2017 Operated by No. 5 Flight RAAF

List of Guided Missiles of the Royal Australian Air Force

Model Variants Origin Role Service period Notes
AGM-65 Maverick United States Air-to-surface guided missile Obsolete, on longer in service with the RAAF. The AGM-65 Maverick was carried by the F/A-18A Hornet
AGM-84 Harpoon AGM-84A United States Air-to-surface anti-ship missile Current The AGM-84 Harpoon was carried by the F/A-18A Hornet, F-111C and F-111G Aardvark
AGM-88 HARM AGM-88E United States Air-to-surface anti-radiation missile Current
AGM-142 Popeye AGM-142 Israel Air-to-surface missile Current
AGM-154 Joint Standoff Weapon United States Glide bomb Current
AGM-158 JASSM United States Air-launched cruise missile Current
AIM-7 Sparrow AIM-7C
AIM-7M
United States Medium-range semi-active homing air-to-air missile 1970- Obsolete, on longer in service with the RAAF. The AIM-7 Sparrow was carried by the F-4E Phantom II and F/A-18A Hornet
AIM-9 Sidewinder AIM-9B
AIM-9L
AIM-9X
United States Short-range air-to-air missile 1960-Current The AIM-9 Sidewinders was carried by the CAC CA-26 Sabre, Mirage IIIO, F/A-18A Hornet, F-111C and F-111G Aardvark.
AIM-120 AMRAAM United States Medium-range active-homing air-to-air missile Current
ASRAAM United Kingdom Short-range air-to-air missile Current
Bloodhound United Kingdom Surface-to-air missile 1962-1968 Obsolete, on longer in service with the RAAF. The Bloodhound missiles were operated by No. 30 Squadron RAAF
GBU-10 Paveway II United States Air-to-surface laser-guided bomb Current Carried by the F-111C and F-111G Aardvark
GBU-12 Paveway II United States Air-to-surface laser-guided bomb 1982-Current Carried by the Mirage IIIO, F-111C and F-111G Aardvark
GBU-15 United States Precision guided munition 1984-Current Carried by the F-111C and F-111G Aardvark
Joint Direct Attack Munition United States Bomb guidance kit Current
Mark 46 torpedo United States Lightweight anti-submarine torpedo Current Carried by the P-3B, P-3C and AP-3C Orion
R.530 France Short-range radar-homing air-to-air missile 1964- Obsolete, on longer in service with the RAAF. The R.530 was carried by the Mirage IIIO
R.550 Magic France Short-range heat-seeking air-to-air missile 1982-1988 Obsolete, on longer in service with the RAAF. The R.550 Magics were carried by the Mirage IIIO

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "The Inter-war years 1921 to 1939". Royal Australian Air Force. Archived from the original on September 30, 2009. Retrieved 25 February 2010.
  2. ^ Cowan, Brendan; Batman; Mark, Mark (8 September 2014). "Avro 504A/B/J/K". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Crick, Darren; Cowan, Brendan; Edwards, Martin (28 February 2015). "Aircraft of Central Flying School 1909 - 1918". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  4. ^ a b Cowan, Brendan; Lax, Mark (2 September 2014). "AFC Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c & B.E.2e". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  5. ^ Cowan, Brendan; Lax, Mark (29 September 2014). "AMC/Airco D.H.1". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  6. ^ Cowan, Brendan (27 August 2015). "AFC Airco D.H.5". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  7. ^ Crick, Darren (31 March 2016). "RAAF A1 de Havilland D.H.9a". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  8. ^ Cowan, Brendan; Lax, Mark (25 April 2015). "AFC Bristol Fighter F.2b". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  9. ^ Cowan, Brendan (2015). "AFC Armstrong Whitworth FK.3". Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History. adf-serials.com.au. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  10. ^ a b c Wilson, Stuart. Military Aircraft of Australia. Weston Creek, ACT: Aerospace Publications. pp. 27–28. ISBN 1-875671-08-0.

External links

CAC Boomerang

The CAC Boomerang is a fighter aircraft designed and manufactured in Australia by the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation between 1942 and 1945. Approved for production shortly following the Empire of Japan's entry into the Second World War, the Boomerang was rapidly designed as to meet the urgent demands for fighter aircraft to equip the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). It was the first combat aircraft designed and constructed in Australia.Different variants of the Boomerang were manufactured under a series of corresponding production contract numbers CA-12, CA-13, CA-14 and CA-19, the aircraft supplied under each subsequent contract would incorporate various modifications, typically aimed at improving the aircraft's performance. The effectiveness of the Boomerang has been contested, the aircraft proving to be slower than contemporary fighter aircraft and thus rarely engaging in aerial combat. During early wartime operations, the Boomerang was mainly dispatched to equip home-based squadrons, freeing up other fighters for use overseas. In later service, the Boomerang would commonly be used for ground support duties, cooperating with Allied army units, in addition to secondary roles such as aerial reconnaissance and air sea rescue.

CAC Winjeel

The CAC CA-25 Winjeel is an Australian-designed and manufactured three-seat training aircraft. Entering service with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in 1955 as a basic to advanced trainer, it served in this role until 1975. Later, it was used in the Forward Air Control (FAC) role for target marking until 1994, after which it was retired from RAAF service.

CAC Wirraway

The CAC Wirraway (an Aboriginal word meaning "challenge") was a training and general purpose military aircraft manufactured in Australia by the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation (CAC) between 1939 and 1946. It was an Australian development of the North American NA-16 training aircraft. The Wirraway has been credited as being the foundation of Australian aircraft manufacturing.During the Second World War, both Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and Royal Australian Navy (RAN) deployed a number of Wirraways into combat roles, where they served in a makeshift light bomber/ground attack capacity, striking against the advancing forces of the Empire of Japan. While the type had been primarily used as a trainer and general purpose aircraft, being present in small quantities within the majority of front-line squadrons for these purposes; the aircraft was often pressed into combat when required. Typically, fighter versions of the Wirraway were operated over theatres such as New Guinea to perform ground attack missions and other Army co-operation tasks over extended periods until more advanced aircraft had become available in sufficient quantities. On 12 December 1942, the Wirraway achieved its only shoot-down of an enemy aircraft -- thought to be a Mitsubishi A6M Zero at the time, but later determined to be a Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa -- while flown by Pilot Officer John S. "Jack" Archer.

Following the end of the conflict, the Wirraway was operated for over a decade as a trainer by the RAAF, the newly formed RAN Fleet Air Arm, and the squadrons of the Citizen Air Force. During 1957, the last of the RAN's Wirraways was retired, having been replaced by the newer jet-powered de Havilland Vampire; as the CAC Winjeel came into squadron service, the RAAF phasing out its remaining fleet of Wirraways during the late 1950s. Officially, the last military flight to be performed by the type was conducted on 27 April 1959. Notably, the Wirraway had also functioned as the starting point for the design of a wartime "emergency fighter", which was also developed and manufactured by CAC, known as the Boomerang.

De Havilland DH.50

The de Havilland DH.50 was a 1920s British large single-engined biplane transport built by de Havilland at Stag Lane Aerodrome, Edgware, and licence-built in Australia, Belgium and Czechoslovakia.

De Havilland Moth Minor

The de Havilland DH.94 Moth Minor was a 1930s British two-seat tourer/trainer aircraft built by de Havilland at Hatfield Aerodrome, England and by de Havilland Australia at Bankstown Aerodrome, Australia.

De Havilland Tiger Moth

The de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth is a 1930s British biplane designed by Geoffrey de Havilland and built by the de Havilland Aircraft Company. It was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and many other operators as a primary trainer aircraft. In addition to the type's principal use for ab-initio training, the Second World War saw RAF Tiger Moths operating in other capacities, including maritime surveillance and defensive anti-invasion preparations; some aircraft were even outfitted to function as armed light bombers.

The Tiger Moth remained in service with the RAF until it was succeeded and replaced by the de Havilland Chipmunk during the early 1950s. Many of the military surplus aircraft subsequently entered into civil operation. Many nations have used the Tiger Moth in both military and civil applications, and it remains in widespread use as a recreational aircraft in several countries. It is still occasionally used as a primary training aircraft, particularly for those pilots wanting to gain experience before moving on to other tailwheel aircraft. Many Tiger Moths are now employed by various companies offering trial lesson experiences. The de Havilland Moth club, founded in 1975, is now an owners' association offering a mutual club and technical support.

Douglas A-20 Havoc

The Douglas A-20 Havoc (company designation DB-7) is a United States attack, light bomber, intruder, and reconnaissance aircraft of World War II.

It served with several Allied air forces, principally the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), the Soviet Air Forces (VVS), Soviet Naval Aviation (AVMF), and the Royal Air Force (RAF) of the United Kingdom. Soviet units received more than one in three (2,908 aircraft) of the DB-7s ultimately built.

It was also used by the air forces of Australia, South Africa, France, and the Netherlands during the war, and by Brazil afterwards.In British Commonwealth air forces, bomber/attack variants of the DB-7 were usually known by the service name Boston, while night fighter and intruder variants were usually known as Havoc. An exception to this was the Royal Australian Air Force, which referred to all variants of the DB-7 by the name Boston. The USAAF referred to night fighter variants as P-70.

English Electric Canberra

The English Electric Canberra is a British first-generation jet-powered medium bomber. It was developed by English Electric during the mid-to-late 1940s in response to a 1944 Air Ministry requirement for a successor to the wartime de Havilland Mosquito fast bomber. Among the performance requirements for the type was the demand for an outstanding high-altitude bombing capability and high speed. These were partly accomplished by making use of newly developed jet propulsion technology. When the Canberra was introduced to service with the Royal Air Force (RAF), the type's first operator, in May 1951, it became the service's first jet-powered bomber.

Throughout most of the 1950s, the Canberra could fly at a higher altitude than any other aircraft in the world. In 1957, a Canberra established a world altitude record of 70,310 feet (21,430 m). In February 1951, another Canberra set another world record when it became the first jet aircraft to make a non-stop transatlantic flight. Due to its ability to evade the early jet interceptor aircraft and its significant performance advancement over contemporary piston-engined bombers, the Canberra became a popular aircraft on the export market, being procured for service in the air forces of many nations both inside and outside of the Commonwealth of Nations. The type was also licence produced in Australia by the Government Aircraft Factories and in the US by Martin as the B-57 Canberra. The latter produced both slightly modified B-57A Canberra, and the significantly updated B-57B.

In addition to being a tactical nuclear strike aircraft, the Canberra proved to be highly adaptable, serving in varied roles such as tactical bombing and photographic and electronic reconnaissance. Canberras served in the Suez Crisis, the Vietnam War, the Falklands War, the Indo-Pakistani wars, and numerous African conflicts. In several wars, each of the opposing sides had Canberras in their air forces. The Canberra had a lengthy service life, serving for more than 50 years with some operators. In June 2006, the RAF retired the last of its Canberras, 57 years after its first flight. Three of the Martin B-57 variant remain in service, performing meteorological work for NASA, as well as providing electronic communication (Battlefield Airborne Communications Node or BACN) testing for deployment to Afghanistan.

Fred David

Friedrich W. "Fred" David, an Austrian Jew, who became the most significant aircraft designer for the Australian aircraft industry during World War Two; having been one of only a few people to have worked for both sides (Allies and Axis powers) in designing aircraft used during the war. David's most famous aircraft was the CAC Boomerang used by the Royal Australian Air Force during the Pacific War.As an Austrian Jew who had recently arrived in Australia in 1939 as a refugee, David was technically an enemy alien, so he had to report to the local Police Station weekly having been interned by Australian immigration officials. David was well-suited to the CAC project, since he had previously worked for Heinkel in pre-Nazi Germany, as well as Mitsubishi and Aichi Kokuki in Japan. His design contributions in Japan resulted in the Mitsubishi A5M Claude fighter and the Aichi D3A Type 99 Val dive-bomber.

Fred David worked on several projects throughout the war but his most technically advanced aircraft never got past the prototype stage, the CAC CA-15 Kangaroo piston fighter. The project was commissioned in early 1943 to overcome the speed and aeronautical limitations of the CAC Boomerang but the prototype did not fly until March 1946. However, despite the aircraft exceeding the maximum speed and climb rate of the Spitfire and Mustang, it was now obsolete with the dawn of the jet age.

List of General Dynamics F-111 aircraft operated by the Royal Australian Air Force

This is a list of the General Dynamics F-111 aircraft operated by the Royal Australian Airforce (RAAF) between 1973 and 2010. The RAAF's fleet of F-111s included 28 F-111Cs (of which four were converted to RF-111C reconnaissance aircraft) and 15 F-111Gs. Several more F-111s were purchased from the United States and used for ground training and testing purposes, or as a source of spare parts.

Miles Falcon

The Miles M.3 Falcon is a 1930s British three/four-seat cabin monoplane aircraft designed by Miles Aircraft Limited.

Royal Australian Air Force

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), formed in March 1921, is the aerial warfare branch of the Australian Defence Force (ADF). It operates the majority of the ADF's fixed wing aircraft, although both the Australian Army and Royal Australian Navy also operate aircraft in various roles. It directly continues the traditions of the Australian Flying Corps (AFC), formed on 22 October 1912. The RAAF provides support across a spectrum of operations such as air superiority, precision strikes, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, air mobility, space surveillance, and humanitarian support.

The RAAF took part in many of the 20th century's major conflicts. During the early years of the Second World War a number of RAAF bomber, fighter, reconnaissance and other squadrons served in Britain, and with the Desert Air Force located in North Africa and the Mediterranean. From 1942, a large number of RAAF units were formed in Australia, and fought in South West Pacific Area. Thousands of Australians also served with other Commonwealth air forces in Europe, including during the bomber offensive against Germany. By the time the war ended, a total of 216,900 men and women served in the RAAF, of whom 10,562 were killed in action.Later the RAAF served in the Berlin Airlift, Korean War, Malayan Emergency, Indonesia–Malaysia Confrontation and Vietnam War. More recently, the RAAF has participated in operations in East Timor, the Iraq War, the War in Afghanistan, and the military intervention against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

The RAAF has 259 aircraft, of which 110 are combat aircraft.

Westland Lysander

The Westland Lysander (nickname the "Lizzie") is a British army co-operation and liaison aircraft produced by Westland Aircraft used immediately before and during the Second World War. After becoming obsolete in the army co-operation role, the aircraft's exceptional short-field performance enabled clandestine missions using small, improvised airstrips behind enemy lines to place or recover agents, particularly in occupied France with the help of the French Resistance. Royal Air Force army co-operation aircraft were named after mythical or historical military leaders; in this case the Spartan admiral Lysander was chosen.

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