List of World Series champions

The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) and concludes the MLB postseason. First played in 1903,[1] the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff and is a contest between the champions of baseball's National League (NL) and American League (AL).[2] Often referred to as the "Fall Classic",[3] the modern World Series has been played every year since 1903 with two exceptions: in 1904, when the NL champion New York Giants declined to play the AL champion Boston Americans; and in 1994, when the series was canceled due to the players' strike.[1][2][4][5]

The best-of-seven style has been the format of all World Series except in 1903, 1919, 1920, and 1921, when the winner was determined through a best-of-nine playoff.[1][2] Although the large majority of contests have been played entirely during the month of October, a small number of Series have also had games played during September and November. The Series-winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy.[6] Players, coaches and others associated with the team are generally given World Series rings to commemorate their victory; however, they have received other items such as pocket watches and medallions in the past.[7] The winning team is traditionally invited to the White House to meet the President of the United States.

A total of 114 Series have been contested, with the NL champion winning 48 and the AL champion winning 66. The New York Yankees of the AL have played in 40 World Series through 2018—winning 27—the most Series appearances and most victories of any Major League Baseball franchise. The Los Angeles Dodgers of the NL have the most losses with 14. The St. Louis Cardinals have represented the NL 19 times, and won 11 championships, second-most among all teams and most among NL clubs.[3] Both the Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers have appeared in more World Series, with 20 each.

The Seattle Mariners and the Washington Nationals (formerly Montreal Expos) are the only current Major League Baseball franchises to have never appeared in a World Series; the San Diego Padres, Colorado Rockies, Texas Rangers (formerly the 1961–1971 version of the Washington Senators), Tampa Bay Rays, and Milwaukee Brewers (formerly Seattle Pilots) have all played in the Series but have never won. The Toronto Blue Jays are the only franchise from outside the United States to appear in a World Series, winning in 1992 and 1993. The Houston Astros have represented both the NL (2005) and the AL (2017), winning the Series in 2017. The current World Series champions are the Boston Red Sox.

1903 World Series - Boston Americans
At the first World Series, held in 1903, the Boston Americans (front row) defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates (back row) in eight games.

Winners

Numbers in parentheses in the table are World Series appearances as of the date of that World Series, and are used as follows:

  • Winning team and losing team columns indicate the number of times that team has appeared in a World Series as well as each respective team's World Series record to date.
Year Winning team Manager Games Losing team Manager Ref.
1903 Boston Americans (1, 1–0) Jimmy Collins 5–3[V] Pittsburgh Pirates (1, 0–1) Fred Clarke [8]
1904 No World Series [1]
1905 New York Giants (1, 1–0) John McGraw 4–1 Philadelphia Athletics (1, 0–1) Connie Mack [9]
1906 Chicago White Sox (1, 1–0) Fielder Jones 4–2 Chicago Cubs (1, 0–1) Frank Chance [10]
1907 Chicago Cubs (2, 1–1) Frank Chance 4–0–(1)[T] Detroit Tigers (1, 0–1) Hugh Jennings [11]
1908 Chicago Cubs (3, 2–1) Frank Chance 4–1 Detroit Tigers (2, 0–2) Hugh Jennings [12]
1909 Pittsburgh Pirates (2, 1–1) Fred Clarke 4–3 Detroit Tigers (3, 0–3) Hugh Jennings [13]
1910 Philadelphia Athletics (2, 1–1) Connie Mack 4–1 Chicago Cubs (4, 2–2) Frank Chance [14]
1911 Philadelphia Athletics (3, 2–1) Connie Mack 4–2 New York Giants (2, 1–1) John McGraw [15]
1912 Boston Red Sox (2, 2–0) Jake Stahl 4–3–(1)[T] New York Giants (3, 1–2) John McGraw [16]
1913 Philadelphia Athletics (4, 3–1) Connie Mack 4–1 New York Giants (4, 1–3) John McGraw [17]
1914 Boston Braves (1, 1–0) George Stallings 4–0 Philadelphia Athletics (5, 3–2) Connie Mack [18]
1915 Boston Red Sox (3, 3–0) Bill Carrigan 4–1 Philadelphia Phillies (1, 0–1) Pat Moran [19]
1916 Boston Red Sox (4, 4–0) Bill Carrigan 4–1 Brooklyn Robins (1, 0–1) Wilbert Robinson [20]
1917 Chicago White Sox (2, 2–0) Pants Rowland 4–2 New York Giants (5, 1–4) John McGraw [21]
1918 Boston Red Sox (5, 5–0) Ed Barrow 4–2 Chicago Cubs (5, 2–3) Fred Mitchell [22]
1919 Cincinnati Reds (1, 1–0) Pat Moran 5–3[V] Chicago White Sox (3, 2–1) Kid Gleason [23]
1920 Cleveland Indians (1, 1–0) Tris Speaker 5–2[V] Brooklyn Robins (2, 0–2) Wilbert Robinson [24]
1921 New York Giants (6, 2–4) John McGraw 5–3[V] New York Yankees (1, 0–1) Miller Huggins [25]
1922 New York Giants (7, 3–4) John McGraw 4–0–(1)[T] New York Yankees (2, 0–2) Miller Huggins [26]
1923 New York Yankees (3, 1–2) Miller Huggins 4–2 New York Giants (8, 3–5) John McGraw [27]
1924 Washington Senators (1, 1–0) Bucky Harris 4–3 New York Giants (9, 3–6) John McGraw [28]
1925 Pittsburgh Pirates (3, 2–1) Bill McKechnie 4–3 Washington Senators (2, 1–1) Bucky Harris [29]
1926 St. Louis Cardinals (1, 1–0) Rogers Hornsby 4–3 New York Yankees (4, 1–3) Miller Huggins [30]
1927 New York Yankees (5, 2–3) Miller Huggins 4–0 Pittsburgh Pirates (4, 2–2) Donie Bush [31]
1928 New York Yankees (6, 3–3) Miller Huggins 4–0 St. Louis Cardinals (2, 1–1) Bill McKechnie [32]
1929 Philadelphia Athletics (6, 4–2) Connie Mack 4–1 Chicago Cubs (6, 2–4) Joe McCarthy [33]
1930 Philadelphia Athletics (7, 5–2) Connie Mack 4–2 St. Louis Cardinals (3, 1–2) Gabby Street [34]
1931 St. Louis Cardinals (4, 2–2) Gabby Street 4–3 Philadelphia Athletics (8, 5–3) Connie Mack [35]
1932 New York Yankees (7, 4–3) Joe McCarthy 4–0 Chicago Cubs (7, 2–5) Charlie Grimm [36]
1933 New York Giants (10, 4–6) Bill Terry 4–1 Washington Senators (3, 1–2) Joe Cronin [37]
1934 St. Louis Cardinals (5, 3–2) Frank Frisch 4–3 Detroit Tigers (4, 0–4) Mickey Cochrane [38]
1935 Detroit Tigers (5, 1–4) Mickey Cochrane 4–2 Chicago Cubs (8, 2–6) Charlie Grimm [39]
1936 New York Yankees (8, 5–3) Joe McCarthy 4–2 New York Giants (11, 4–7) Bill Terry [40]
1937 New York Yankees (9, 6–3) Joe McCarthy 4–1 New York Giants (12, 4–8) Bill Terry [41]
1938 New York Yankees (10, 7–3) Joe McCarthy 4–0 Chicago Cubs (9, 2–7) Gabby Hartnett [42]
1939 New York Yankees (11, 8–3) Joe McCarthy 4–0 Cincinnati Reds (2, 1–1) Bill McKechnie [43]
1940 Cincinnati Reds (3, 2–1) Bill McKechnie 4–3 Detroit Tigers (6, 1–5) Del Baker [44]
1941 New York Yankees (12, 9–3) Joe McCarthy 4–1 Brooklyn Dodgers (3, 0–3) Leo Durocher [45]
1942 St. Louis Cardinals (6, 4–2) Billy Southworth 4–1 New York Yankees (13, 9–4) Joe McCarthy [46]
1943 New York Yankees (14, 10–4) Joe McCarthy 4–1 St. Louis Cardinals (7, 4–3) Billy Southworth [47]
1944 St. Louis Cardinals (8, 5–3) Billy Southworth 4–2 St. Louis Browns (1, 0–1) Luke Sewell [48]
1945 Detroit Tigers (7, 2–5) Steve O'Neill 4–3 Chicago Cubs (10, 2–8) Charlie Grimm [49]
1946 St. Louis Cardinals (9, 6–3) Eddie Dyer 4–3 Boston Red Sox (6, 5–1) Joe Cronin [50]
1947 New York Yankees (15, 11–4) Bucky Harris 4–3 Brooklyn Dodgers (4, 0–4) Burt Shotton [51]
1948 Cleveland Indians (2, 2–0) Lou Boudreau 4–2 Boston Braves (2, 1–1) Billy Southworth [52]
1949 New York Yankees (16, 12–4) Casey Stengel 4–1 Brooklyn Dodgers (5, 0–5) Burt Shotton [53]
1950 New York Yankees (17, 13–4) Casey Stengel 4–0 Philadelphia Phillies (2, 0–2) Eddie Sawyer [54]
1951 New York Yankees (18, 14–4) Casey Stengel 4–2 New York Giants (13, 4–9) Leo Durocher [55]
1952 New York Yankees (19, 15–4) Casey Stengel 4–3 Brooklyn Dodgers (6, 0–6) Charlie Dressen [56]
1953 New York Yankees (20, 16–4) Casey Stengel 4–2 Brooklyn Dodgers (7, 0–7) Charlie Dressen [57]
1954 New York Giants (14, 5–9) Leo Durocher 4–0 Cleveland Indians (3, 2–1) Al Lopez [58]
1955 Brooklyn Dodgers (8, 1–7) Walter Alston 4–3 New York Yankees (21, 16–5) Casey Stengel [59]
1956 New York Yankees (22, 17–5) Casey Stengel 4–3 Brooklyn Dodgers (9, 1–8) Walter Alston [60]
1957 Milwaukee Braves (3, 2–1) Fred Haney 4–3 New York Yankees (23, 17–6) Casey Stengel [61]
1958 New York Yankees (24, 18–6) Casey Stengel 4–3 Milwaukee Braves (4, 2–2) Fred Haney [62]
1959 Los Angeles Dodgers (10, 2–8) Walter Alston 4–2 Chicago White Sox (4, 2–2) Al Lopez [63]
1960 Pittsburgh Pirates (5, 3–2) Danny Murtaugh 4–3 New York Yankees (25, 18–7) Casey Stengel [64]
1961 New York Yankees (26, 19–7) Ralph Houk 4–1 Cincinnati Reds (4, 2–2) Fred Hutchinson [65]
1962 New York Yankees (27, 20–7) Ralph Houk 4–3 San Francisco Giants (15, 5–10) Alvin Dark [66]
1963 Los Angeles Dodgers (11, 3–8) Walter Alston 4–0 New York Yankees (28, 20–8) Ralph Houk [67]
1964 St. Louis Cardinals (10, 7–3) Johnny Keane 4–3 New York Yankees (29, 20–9) Yogi Berra [68]
1965 Los Angeles Dodgers (12, 4–8) Walter Alston 4–3 Minnesota Twins (4, 1–3) Sam Mele [69]
1966 Baltimore Orioles (2, 1–1) Hank Bauer 4–0 Los Angeles Dodgers (13, 4–9) Walter Alston [70]
1967 St. Louis Cardinals (11, 8–3) Red Schoendienst 4–3 Boston Red Sox (7, 5–2) Dick Williams [71]
1968 Detroit Tigers (8, 3–5) Mayo Smith 4–3 St. Louis Cardinals (12, 8–4) Red Schoendienst [72]
1969 New York Mets (1, 1–0) Gil Hodges 4–1 Baltimore Orioles (3, 1–2) Earl Weaver [73]
1970 Baltimore Orioles (4, 2–2) Earl Weaver 4–1 Cincinnati Reds (5, 2–3) Sparky Anderson [74]
1971 Pittsburgh Pirates (6, 4–2) Danny Murtaugh 4–3 Baltimore Orioles (5, 2–3) Earl Weaver [75]
1972 Oakland Athletics (9, 6–3) Dick Williams 4–3 Cincinnati Reds (6, 2–4) Sparky Anderson [76]
1973 Oakland Athletics (10, 7–3) Dick Williams 4–3 New York Mets (2, 1–1) Yogi Berra [77]
1974 Oakland Athletics (11, 8–3) Alvin Dark 4–1 Los Angeles Dodgers (14, 4–10) Walter Alston [78]
1975 Cincinnati Reds (7, 3–4) Sparky Anderson 4–3 Boston Red Sox (8, 5–3) Darrell Johnson [79]
1976 Cincinnati Reds (8, 4–4) Sparky Anderson 4–0 New York Yankees (30, 20–10) Billy Martin [80]
1977 New York Yankees (31, 21–10) Billy Martin 4–2 Los Angeles Dodgers (15, 4–11) Tommy Lasorda [81]
1978 New York Yankees (32, 22–10) Bob Lemon 4–2 Los Angeles Dodgers (16, 4–12) Tommy Lasorda [82]
1979 Pittsburgh Pirates (7, 5–2) Chuck Tanner 4–3 Baltimore Orioles (6, 2–4) Earl Weaver [83]
1980 Philadelphia Phillies (3, 1–2) Dallas Green 4–2 Kansas City Royals (1, 0–1) Jim Frey [84]
1981 Los Angeles Dodgers (17, 5–12) Tommy Lasorda 4–2 New York Yankees (33, 22–11) Bob Lemon [85]
1982 St. Louis Cardinals (13, 9–4) Whitey Herzog 4–3 Milwaukee Brewers[L1] (1, 0–1) Harvey Kuenn [86]
1983 Baltimore Orioles (7, 3–4) Joe Altobelli 4–1 Philadelphia Phillies (4, 1–3) Paul Owens [87]
1984 Detroit Tigers (9, 4–5) Sparky Anderson 4–1 San Diego Padres (1, 0–1) Dick Williams [88]
1985 Kansas City Royals (2, 1–1) Dick Howser 4–3 St. Louis Cardinals (14, 9–5) Whitey Herzog [89]
1986 New York Mets (3, 2–1) Davey Johnson 4–3 Boston Red Sox (9, 5–4) John McNamara [90]
1987 Minnesota Twins (5, 2–3) Tom Kelly 4–3 St. Louis Cardinals (15, 9–6) Whitey Herzog [91]
1988 Los Angeles Dodgers (18, 6–12) Tommy Lasorda 4–1 Oakland Athletics (12, 8–4) Tony La Russa [92]
1989 Oakland Athletics (13, 9–4) Tony La Russa 4–0 San Francisco Giants (16, 5–11) Roger Craig [93]
1990 Cincinnati Reds (9, 5–4) Lou Piniella 4–0 Oakland Athletics (14, 9–5) Tony La Russa [94]
1991 Minnesota Twins (6, 3–3) Tom Kelly 4–3 Atlanta Braves (5, 2–3) Bobby Cox [95]
1992 Toronto Blue Jays (1, 1–0) Cito Gaston 4–2 Atlanta Braves (6, 2–4) Bobby Cox [96]
1993 Toronto Blue Jays (2, 2–0) Cito Gaston 4–2 Philadelphia Phillies (5, 1–4) Jim Fregosi [97]
1994 No World Series due to a players' strike.
1995 Atlanta Braves (7, 3–4) Bobby Cox 4–2 Cleveland Indians (4, 2–2) Mike Hargrove [98]
1996 New York Yankees (34, 23–11) Joe Torre 4–2 Atlanta Braves (8, 3–5) Bobby Cox [99]
1997 Florida Marlins[W] (1, 1–0) Jim Leyland 4–3 Cleveland Indians (5, 2–3) Mike Hargrove [100]
1998 New York Yankees (35, 24–11) Joe Torre 4–0 San Diego Padres (2, 0–2) Bruce Bochy [101]
1999 New York Yankees (36, 25–11) Joe Torre 4–0 Atlanta Braves (9, 3–6) Bobby Cox [102]
2000 New York Yankees (37, 26–11) Joe Torre 4–1 New York Mets[W] (4, 2–2) Bobby Valentine [103]
2001 Arizona Diamondbacks (1, 1–0) Bob Brenly 4–3 New York Yankees (38, 26–12) Joe Torre [104]
2002 Anaheim Angels[W] (1, 1–0) Mike Scioscia 4–3 San Francisco Giants[W] (17, 5–12) Dusty Baker [105]
2003 Florida Marlins[W] (2, 2–0) Jack McKeon 4–2 New York Yankees (39, 26–13) Joe Torre [106]
2004 Boston Red Sox[W] (10, 6–4) Terry Francona 4–0 St. Louis Cardinals (16, 9–7) Tony La Russa [107]
2005 Chicago White Sox (5, 3–2) Ozzie Guillén 4–0 Houston Astros[W][L2] (1, 0–1) Phil Garner [108]
2006 St. Louis Cardinals (17, 10–7) Tony La Russa 4–1 Detroit Tigers[W] (10, 4–6) Jim Leyland [109]
2007 Boston Red Sox (11, 7–4) Terry Francona 4–0 Colorado Rockies[W] (1, 0–1) Clint Hurdle [110]
2008 Philadelphia Phillies (6, 2–4) Charlie Manuel 4–1 Tampa Bay Rays (1, 0–1) Joe Maddon [111]
2009 New York Yankees (40, 27–13) Joe Girardi 4–2 Philadelphia Phillies (7, 2–5) Charlie Manuel [112]
2010 San Francisco Giants (18, 6–12) Bruce Bochy 4–1 Texas Rangers (1, 0–1) Ron Washington [113]
2011 St. Louis Cardinals[W] (18, 11–7) Tony La Russa 4–3 Texas Rangers (2, 0–2) Ron Washington [114]
2012 San Francisco Giants (19, 7–12) Bruce Bochy 4–0 Detroit Tigers (11, 4–7) Jim Leyland [115]
2013 Boston Red Sox (12, 8–4) John Farrell 4–2 St. Louis Cardinals (19, 11–8) Mike Matheny [116]
2014 San Francisco Giants[W] (20, 8–12) Bruce Bochy 4–3 Kansas City Royals[W] (3, 1–2) Ned Yost [117]
2015 Kansas City Royals (4, 2–2) Ned Yost 4–1 New York Mets (5, 2–3) Terry Collins [118]
2016 Chicago Cubs (11, 3–8) Joe Maddon 4–3 Cleveland Indians (6, 2–4) Terry Francona [119]
2017 Houston Astros[L2] (2, 1–1) A. J. Hinch 4–3 Los Angeles Dodgers (19, 6–13) Dave Roberts [120]
2018 Boston Red Sox (13, 9–4) Alex Cora 4–1 Los Angeles Dodgers (20, 6–14) Dave Roberts [121]

Series Appearances by Franchise

Appearances by Franchise

Apps Team League Series Games Founded
Won Lost Win % Most
recent
win
Most
recent
app.
Won Lost Tied Win % Most
recent
win
40 New York Yankees AL 27 13 .675 2009 2009 134 90 1 .598 2009 1901
20 San Francisco Giants NL 8 12 .400 2014 2014 57 57 2 .500 2014 1883
20 Los Angeles Dodgers NL 6 14 .300 1988 2018 48 64 0 .429 2018 1884
19 St. Louis Cardinals NL 11 8 .579 2011 2013 58 60 0 .492 2013 1882
14 Oakland Athletics AL 9 5 .643 1989 1990 41 34 0 .547 1989 1901
13 Boston Red Sox AL 9 4 .692 2018 2018 45 28 1 .620 2018 1901
11 Detroit Tigers AL 4 7 .364 1984 2012 27 37 1 .423 2006 1901
11 Chicago Cubs NL 3 8 .273 2016 2016 23 36 1 .392 2016 1874
9 Cincinnati Reds NL 5 4 .556 1990 1990 26 25 0 .510 1990 1882
9 Atlanta Braves NL 3 6 .333 1995 1999 24 29 0 .453 1996 1871
7 Pittsburgh Pirates NL 5 2 .714 1979 1979 23 24 0 .489 1979 1882
7 Baltimore Orioles AL 3 4 .429 1983 1983 21 18 0 .538 1983 1901
7 Philadelphia Phillies NL 2 5 .286 2008 2009 14 23 0 .378 2009 1883
6 Minnesota Twins AL 3 3 .500 1991 1991 19 21 0 .475 1991 1901
6 Cleveland Indians AL 2 4 .333 1948 2016 17 20 0 .459 2016 1901
5 Chicago White Sox AL 3 2 .600 2005 2005 17 13 0 .567 2005 1901
5 New York Mets NL 2 3 .400 1986 2015 13 16 0 .448 1986 1962
4 Kansas City Royals AL 2 2 .500 2015 2015 13 12 0 .520 2015 1969
2 Miami Marlins NL 2 0 1.000 2003 2003 8 5 0 .615 2003 1993
2 Toronto Blue Jays AL 2 0 1.000 1993 1993 8 4 0 .667 1993 1977
2 Houston Astros NL/AL[L2] 1 1 .500 2017 2017 4 7 0 .364 2017 1962
2 Texas Rangers AL 0 2 .000 2011 4 8 0 .333 2011 1961
2 San Diego Padres NL 0 2 .000 1998 1 8 0 .111 1984 1969
1 Los Angeles Angels AL 1 0 1.000 2002 2002 4 3 0 .571 2002 1961
1 Arizona Diamondbacks NL 1 0 1.000 2001 2001 4 3 0 .571 2001 1998
1 Tampa Bay Rays AL 0 1 .000 2008 1 4 0 .200 2008 1998
1 Colorado Rockies NL 0 1 .000 2007 0 4 0 .000 1993
1 Milwaukee Brewers AL/NL[L1] 0 1 .000 1982 3 4 0 .429 1982 1969
0 Seattle Mariners AL 0 0 0 0 0 1977
0 Washington Nationals NL 0 0 0 0 0 1969

Years of appearance

In the sortable table below, teams are ordered first by number of appearances, then by number of wins, and finally by year of first appearance. In the "Season(s)" column, bold years indicate winning World Series appearances.

Apps Team Wins Losses Win % Season(s)
40 New York Yankees 27 13 .675 1921, 1922, 1923, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2009
20 San Francisco Giants 8 12 .400 1905, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1917, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1933, 1936, 1937, 1951, 1954, 1962, 1989, 2002, 2010, 2012, 2014
20 Los Angeles Dodgers 6 14 .300 1916, 1920, 1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1959, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1974, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1988, 2017, 2018
19 St. Louis Cardinals 11 8 .579 1926, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1934, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1964, 1967, 1968, 1982, 1985, 1987, 2004, 2006, 2011, 2013
14 Oakland Athletics 9 5 .643 1905, 1910, 1911, 1913, 1914, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1988, 1989, 1990
13 Boston Red Sox 9 4 .692 1903, 1912, 1915, 1916, 1918, 1946, 1967, 1975, 1986, 2004, 2007, 2013, 2018
11 Detroit Tigers 4 7 .364 1907, 1908, 1909, 1934, 1935, 1940, 1945, 1968, 1984, 2006, 2012
11 Chicago Cubs 3 8 .273 1906, 1907, 1908, 1910, 1918, 1929, 1932, 1935, 1938, 1945, 2016
9 Cincinnati Reds 5 4 .556 1919, 1939, 1940, 1961, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1990
9 Atlanta Braves 3 6 .333 1914, 1948, 1957, 1958, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1999
7 Pittsburgh Pirates 5 2 .714 1903, 1909, 1925, 1927, 1960, 1971, 1979
7 Baltimore Orioles 3 4 .429 1944, 1966, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1979, 1983
7 Philadelphia Phillies 2 5 .286 1915, 1950, 1980, 1983, 1993, 2008, 2009
6 Minnesota Twins 3 3 .500 1924, 1925, 1933, 1965, 1987, 1991
6 Cleveland Indians 2 4 .333 1920, 1948, 1954, 1995, 1997, 2016
5 Chicago White Sox 3 2 .600 1906, 1917, 1919, 1959, 2005
5 New York Mets 2 3 .400 1969, 1973, 1986, 2000, 2015
4 Kansas City Royals 2 2 .500 1980, 1985, 2014, 2015
2 Toronto Blue Jays 2 0 1.000 1992, 1993
2 Miami Marlins 2 0 1.000 1997, 2003
2 Houston Astros 1 1 .500 2005, 2017
2 San Diego Padres 0 2 .000 1984, 1998
2 Texas Rangers 0 2 .000 2010, 2011
1 Arizona Diamondbacks 1 0 1.000 2001
1 Los Angeles Angels 1 0 1.000 2002
1 Milwaukee Brewers 0 1 .000 1982
1 Colorado Rockies 0 1 .000 2007
1 Tampa Bay Rays 0 1 .000 2008
0 Washington Nationals 0 0
0 Seattle Mariners 0 0

Frequent matchups

The following are the 20 matchups of teams that have occurred two or more times in the World Series. All teams which have participated in these were "Classic Eight" members of either the American or National League; no expansion team (created in 1961 or later) has faced an opponent more than once in a World Series.

Count Matchup Record Years
11 Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers vs. New York Yankees Yankees, 8–3 1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1963, 1977, 1978, 1981
7 New York Yankees vs. New York/San Francisco Giants Yankees, 5–2 1921, 1922, 1923, 1936, 1937, 1951, 1962
5 New York Yankees vs. St. Louis Cardinals Cardinals, 3–2 1926, 1928, 1942, 1943, 1964
4 Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves vs. New York Yankees Yankees, 3–1 1957, 1958, 1996, 1999
4 Boston Red Sox vs. St. Louis Cardinals Tied, 2–2 1946, 1967, 2004, 2013
4 Chicago Cubs vs. Detroit Tigers Tied, 2–2 1907, 1908, 1935, 1945
4 Philadelphia/Oakland Athletics vs. New York/San Francisco Giants Athletics, 3–1 1905, 1911, 1913, 1989
3 Cincinnati Reds vs. New York Yankees Yankees, 2–1 1939, 1961, 1976
3 Detroit Tigers vs. St. Louis Cardinals Cardinals, 2–1 1934, 1968, 2006
2 Boston/Atlanta Braves vs. Cleveland Indians Tied, 1–1 1948, 1995
2 Baltimore Orioles vs. Pittsburgh Pirates Pirates, 2–0 1971, 1979
2 Chicago Cubs vs. New York Yankees Yankees, 2–0 1932, 1938
2 Chicago Cubs vs. Philadelphia Athletics (now Oakland) Athletics, 2–0 1910, 1929
2 Cincinnati Reds vs. Oakland Athletics Tied, 1–1 1972, 1990
2 Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Oakland Athletics Tied, 1–1 1974, 1988
2 Washington Senators (now Minnesota Twins) vs. New York Giants (now San Francisco) Tied, 1–1 1924, 1933
2 New York Yankees vs. Philadelphia Phillies Yankees, 2–0 1950, 2009
2 New York Yankees vs. Pittsburgh Pirates Tied, 1–1 1927, 1960
2 Philadelphia Athletics (now Oakland) vs. St. Louis Cardinals Tied, 1–1 1930, 1931
2 Boston Red Sox vs. Brooklyn Robins/Los Angeles Dodgers Red Sox, 2–0 1916, 2018

Notes

  • T The 1907, 1912, and 1922 World Series each included one tied game.
  • V The 1903, 1919, 1920, and 1921 World Series were in a best-of-nine format (carried by the first team to win five games).
  • W Indicates a team which made the playoffs as a wild card team (rather than by winning a division).[1]
  • L1 The Brewers were in the American League from 1969–1997, after which they switched to the National League.[122]
  • L2 The Astros were in the National League from 1962–2012, after which they switched to the American League.

See also

References

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External links

American League Championship Series

The American League Championship Series (ALCS) is a best-of-seven series played in October in the Major League Baseball postseason that determines the winner of the American League (AL) pennant. The winner of the series advances to play the winner of the National League (NL) Championship Series (NLCS) in the World Series, Major League Baseball's championship series.

American League Division Series

In Major League Baseball, the American League Division Series (ALDS) determines which two teams from the American League will advance to the American League Championship Series. The Division Series consists of two best-of-five series, featuring the three division winners and the winner of the wild-card play-off.

Commissioner's Trophy (MLB)

The Commissioner's Trophy is presented each year by the Commissioner of Baseball to the Major League Baseball team that wins the World Series. Recent trophy designs contain flags representing each team in North America's top two leagues, the National League and the American League. The two participating teams in that year's World Series were previously represented by two press pins set on the base of the trophy. It is the only championship trophy of the five major sports in North America that is not named after a particular person (contrasting with the National Hockey League's Stanley Cup, Major League Soccer's Philip F. Anschutz Trophy, the National Football League's Vince Lombardi Trophy, and the National Basketball Association's Larry O'Brien Trophy).

Division Series

The Division Series (also known as the League Division Series) is the quarterfinal round of the Major League Baseball playoffs. As with any quarterfinal in a best-of tournament, a total of four series are played in this round, two each for both the American League and the National League.

League Championship Series

The League Championship Series (LCS) is the semifinal round of postseason play in Major League Baseball which has been conducted since 1969. In 1981, and since 1995, the two annual series have matched up the winners of the Division Series, and the winners advance to meet in the World Series. The LCS comprises the American League Championship Series (ALCS) and National League Championship Series (NLCS).

List of American League pennant winners

Each season, one American League (AL) team wins the pennant, signifying that they are the league's champion and have the right to play in the World Series against the champion of the National League. The pennant was presented to the team with the best win–loss record each year through the 1968 season, after which the American League Championship Series (ALCS) was introduced to decide the pennant winner. The first modern World Series was played in 1903 and, after a hiatus in 1904, has taken place every season except 1994, when a players' strike forced the cancellation of the postseason. The current American League pennant holders are the Boston Red Sox who won in October 2018.

In 1969, the league split into two divisions, and the teams with the best records in each division played one another in the five-game ALCS to determine the pennant winner, who received (and continues to receive) the William Harridge Trophy. The trophy featured a golden eagle, the league's emblem, sitting atop a silver baseball and clutching the American League banner. Since 2017, the trophy is all silver with a pennant on top. The trophy is named for Will Harridge, who was league president from 1931 to 1958. The format of the ALCS was changed from a best-of-five to a best-of-seven format in the 1985 postseason. In 1995, an additional playoff series was added when Major League Baseball restructured into three divisions in each league. As of 2010, the winners of the Eastern, Central, and Western Divisions, as well as the AL Wild Card winner, play in the American League Division Series, a best-of-five playoff to determine the opponents who will play in the ALCS. American League pennant winners have gone on to win the World Series 66 times, most recently in 2018.

The New York Yankees have won 40 AL pennants, winning their first in 1921 and their most recent in 2009. This total is more than twice that of the next-closest team, the Oakland Athletics, who have won 15. They are followed by the Boston Red Sox and the Detroit Tigers, with 14 and 11 pennants won respectively. The Yankees have the most pennants since the introduction of the ALCS in 1969 with 11, followed by the Athletics and the Baltimore Orioles with 6 and 5 respectively. The Yankees also hold the record for most wins by a pennant-winning team, with their 1998 team winning 114 out of 162 games, finishing 22 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. The 1954 Cleveland Indians won the most games of any pennant winner under the pre-1969 system, winning 111 out of their 154 games and finishing eight games ahead of the Yankees. The Milwaukee Brewers won the American League pennant in 1982 but later moved to the National League starting in the 1998 season.The only American League team to have never won a pennant is the Seattle Mariners.

List of Major League Baseball postseason teams

This article is a list of the teams that have participated in the Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason, the elimination tournament conducted after the regular season by which Major League Baseball determines its World Series champion for a given year.

Major League Baseball's postseason format has evolved throughout its history, with the number of participating teams increasing from two (for its first six-plus decades) to the current 10. The World Series was first played in 1903, when the champions of the established National League (NL) and the upstart American League (AL) met for a playoff series. From that time through 1968, the two leagues (which each had eight teams through 1960) each sent only its team with the best regular-season record to the World Series. In 1969, as each league had expanded to 12 teams, each league was divided into East and West divisions and another playoff round was created. This round became known as the League Championship Series (LCS), with the four division champions competing for a spot in the World Series every year. This format lasted until 1993.

In 1995, the again-expanded leagues were re-organized into three separate divisions, and another playoff round was established, called the Division Series (DS). In this format, for each league, the champions of the East, Central, and West divisions would be joined in the playoffs by a Wild Card team. The addition of the Wild Card allowed a team that was not a division winner but still had one of the top regular-season records to enter the playoffs as the number 4 seed. In 2012, the structure was adjusted such that two teams from each league receive Wild Card berths and then play a single game against each other to determine who advances to the Division Series. This is the current playoff format in Major League Baseball.

Three anomalies in the above-described system occurred. In 1904, the World Series did not take place because the National League champion did not wish to participate and the leagues had not yet agreed to require their champions to do so. In 1981, there was a Division Series due to a split season brought about by a midsummer player's strike. And in 1994, the postseason did not take place due to a player's strike.

List of National League pennant winners

Each season, a National League team wins the league's pennant, signifying that they are its champion and they win the right to play in the World Series against the champion of the American League. In addition to the pennant, the team that wins the National League playoffs receives the Warren C. Giles Trophy, named after Warren Giles, who was the league president from 1951 to 1969. Warren's son Bill Giles, the honorary league president and owner of the Philadelphia Phillies, presents the trophy to the National League champion at the conclusion of each National League Championship Series (NLCS). The current National League pennant winners are the Los Angeles Dodgers, who won their second-consecutive NL pennant in October 2018.For most of the history of the National League (94 years), the pennant was presented to the team with the best win–loss record at the end of the season. The first modern World Series was played in 1903, and after a hiatus in 1904, continued until 1994, when a players' strike forced the cancellation of the postseason, and resumed in 1995. In 1969, the league split into two divisions, and the teams with the best records in each division played one another in the NLCS to determine the pennant winner. The format of the NLCS was changed from a best-of-five to a best-of-seven format for the 1985 postseason. In 1995, an additional playoff series was added when Major League Baseball restructured the two divisions in each league into three. As of 2010, the winners of the Eastern, Central, and Western Divisions, as well as one wild card team, play in the National League Division Series, a best-of-five playoff to determine the opponents who will play for the pennant.By pennants, the Los Angeles Dodgers (formerly the Brooklyn Dodgers; 23 pennants, 31 playoff appearances) and the San Francisco Giants (formerly the New York Giants) (23 pennants, 27 playoff appearances) are tied for the winningest teams in the National League. In third place is the St. Louis Cardinals (19 pennants and 28 playoff appearances), followed by the Atlanta Braves (17 pennants and 23 postseason appearances between their three home cities of Atlanta, Milwaukee, and Boston) and the Chicago Cubs (17 pennants and 20 playoff appearances [as the Cubs and White Stockings]). The Philadelphia Phillies won the league in back-to-back seasons in 2008 and 2009, becoming the first National League team to do so since the Braves in 1995 and 1996. The Los Angeles Dodgers would also win the league in back-to-back seasons in 2017 and 2018. Before 1903 there was no World Series as we know it today because the leagues were only loosely affiliated. As of 2018, the New York/San Francisco Giants and the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers have the most World Series appearances at 20, followed by the St. Louis Cardinals with 19.

The team with the best record to win the National League pennant was the 1906 Cubs, who won 116 of 152 games during that season and finished 20 games ahead of the Giants, playing in New York at the time. The best record by a pennant-winner in the Championship Series era is 108–54, which was achieved by the Cincinnati Reds in 1975 and the New York Mets in 1986; both of these teams went on to win the World Series.National League champions have gone on to win the World Series 48 times, most recently in 2016. Pennant-winners have also won the Temple Cup and the Chronicle-Telegraph Cup, two pre-World Series league championships, although second-place teams won three of the four Temple Cup meetings. The largest margin of victory for a pennant-winner, before the league split into two divisions in 1969, is ​27 1⁄2 games; the Pittsburgh Pirates led the Brooklyn Superbas (now the Dodgers) by that margin on the final day of the 1902 season.The only currently-existing National League team to have never won a pennant is the Washington Nationals (formerly the Montreal Expos). While the Milwaukee Brewers have never won a National League pennant, they did win a pennant during their time in the American League.

List of pre-World Series baseball champions

The modern World Series, the current championship series of Major League Baseball, began in 1903, and was established as an annual event in 1905. Before the formation of the American Association (AA), there were no playoff rounds—all championships went to the team with the best record at the end of the season. In the initial season of the National League (NL) in 1876, there was controversy as to which team was the champion: the Chicago White Stockings, who had the best overall record (52–14), or the St. Louis Brown Stockings (45–19), who were the only team to have a winning record against every other franchise in the league. The teams agreed to play a five-game "Championship of the West" series, won by St. Louis, 4 games to 1. Beginning in 1884, the championship series between the National League and the American Association were promoted and referred to as the "World's Championship Series" (WCS), or "World's Series" for short; however, they are not officially recognized by Major League Baseball as part of World Series history. Though early publications, such as Ernest Lanigan's Baseball Cyclopedia and Turkin and Thompson's Encyclopedia of Baseball, listed the 19th-century games on an equal basis with those of the 20th century, Sporting News publications about the World Series, which began in the 1920s, ignored the 19th-century games, as did most publications about the Series after 1960. Major League Baseball, in general, regards 19th-century events as a prologue to the modern era of baseball, which is defined by the emergence of the two present major leagues.

In the second year of the WCS, a dispute in the 1885 series concerned Game 2, which was forfeited by the St. Louis Browns when they pulled their team off the field protesting an umpiring decision. The managers, Cap Anson and Charles Comiskey, initially agreed to disregard the game. When St. Louis won the final game and an apparent 3–2 series championship, Chicago owner Albert Spalding overruled his manager and declared that he wanted the forfeit counted. The result of a tied WCS was that neither team got the prize money that had been posted by the owners before the series (and was returned to them after they both agreed it was a tie). Following the collapse of the AA in 1891, four of its clubs were admitted to the National League. The league championship was awarded in 1892 by a playoff between half-season champions. This scheme was abandoned after one season. Beginning in 1893—and continuing until divisional play was introduced in 1969—the pennant was awarded to the first-place club in the standings at the end of the season. For four seasons, the league champions played the runners-up in the postseason championship series called the Temple Cup. A second attempt at this format was the Chronicle-Telegraph Cup series in 1900.

Los Angeles Dodgers

The Los Angeles Dodgers are an American professional baseball team based in Los Angeles, California. The Dodgers compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) West division. Established in 1883 in Brooklyn, New York, the team moved to Los Angeles before the 1958 season. They played for four seasons at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum before moving to their current home of Dodger Stadium in 1962.

The Dodgers as a franchise have won six World Series titles and 23 National League pennants. 11 NL MVP award winners have played for the Dodgers, winning a total of 13 MVP Awards; eight Cy Young Award winners have pitched for the Dodgers, winning a total of twelve Cy Young Awards. The team has also produced 18 Rookie of the Year Award winners, twice as many as the next closest team, including four consecutive from 1979 to 1982 and five consecutive from 1992 to 1996.

Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, and the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901, respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Baseball's first openly all-professional team was founded in Cincinnati in 1869. (There had been teams in the past that paid some players, and some that had paid all players but under the table.) The first few decades of professional baseball were characterized by rivalries between leagues and by players who often jumped from one team or league to another.

The period before 1920 in baseball is known as the dead-ball era; players rarely hit home runs during this time. Baseball survived a conspiracy to fix the 1919 World Series, which came to be known as the Black Sox Scandal. The sport rose in popularity in the 1920s, and survived potential downturns during the Great Depression and World War II. Shortly after the war, Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier.

The 1950s and 1960s were a time of expansion for the AL and NL, then new stadiums and artificial turf surfaces began to change the game in the 1970s and 1980s. Home runs dominated the game during the 1990s, and media reports began to discuss the use of anabolic steroids among Major League players in the mid-2000s. In 2006, an investigation produced the Mitchell Report, which implicated many players in the use of performance-enhancing substances, including at least one player from each team.

Today, MLB is composed of 30 teams: 29 in the United States and 1 in Canada. Teams play 162 games each season and five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903. Baseball broadcasts are aired on television, radio, and the Internet throughout North America and in several other countries throughout the world. MLB has the highest season attendance of any sports league in the world with more than 69.6 million spectators in 2018.

Major League Baseball Wild Card Game

The Major League Baseball Wild Card Game is a play-in game which was added to the Major League Baseball postseason in 2012. The addition keeps the playoff format similar to the three-tiered postseason format used from 1995 through 2011, but adds a second wild-card team. Two wild-card teams in each league play each other in a single-game playoff after the end of the regular season. The winner of the game advances to face the 1st seeded team in the Division Series. The home team for the wild-card game is the team with the better regular-season record (4th Seed).

If both teams have the same number of wins and losses, tie-breaking procedures are used, with no additional games being played. On the other hand, teams tied for the division title will now always play a one-game playoff for the division title, even if both teams are already qualified for the postseason. This is in contrast to the earlier wild card format used, for example in the 2005 season when the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox tied for first place in their division but did not play an additional game as both teams were qualified for the postseason in any event.

In the division series, the winner of the wild-card game will always face whichever division champion has the best record. All division winners receive a bye as they await the result of the game. Previously, a wild-card team could not face the champion of its own division. This change makes it possible for the two teams with the best record in the league to face each other before the League Championship Series for the first time since 1997, if the wild card winner has the second-best record only to its own division's champion. From 1995 to 1997 the matchups for the division series were determined by annual rotation between the west, central and east divisions.

Nineteen of the thirty MLB franchises have appeared in a Wild Card Game. The New York Yankees of the American League and the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League have appeared in a record three games. The San Francisco Giants and the New York Yankees have won the most Wild Card Games with two each.

Major League Baseball postseason

The Major League Baseball postseason is an elimination tournament held after the conclusion of the MLB regular season. As of 2012, the playoffs for each league—American and National—consist of a one-game wild-card playoff between two wild card teams, two best-of-five Division Series (LDS) featuring the wild-card winner and the winner of each division, and finally the best-of-seven League Championship Series (LCS). The winners of the American League Championship Series (ALCS) and the National League Championship Series (NLCS) play each other in the best-of-seven World Series.

Major League Baseball wild card

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the wild card teams are the two teams in each of the two leagues (American and National) that have qualified for the postseason despite failing to win their division. Both teams in each league possess the two best winning percentages in their respective league after the three division winners. The wild card was first instituted in MLB in 1994, with one wild-card team per league advancing to the Division Series in the postseason to face a division winner. In 2012, the system was modified to add a second wild-card team per league and put each league's wild-card teams against each other in a play-in game—the MLB Wild Card Game—the winner of which would then advance to the Division Series and play the team with the best record. This system ensures that the team with the second-best record in each league, after the three division winners and the team with the first-best record in the league that is a non-division winner, will also get a postseason berth, even if it isn't a division champion.

National League Championship Series

The National League Championship Series (NLCS) is a best-of-seven series played in October in the Major League Baseball postseason that determines the winner of the National League (NL) pennant. The winner of the series advances to play the winner of the American League Championship Series (ALCS) in the World Series, Major League Baseball's championship series.

National League Division Series

In Major League Baseball, the National League Division Series (NLDS) determines which two teams from the National League will advance to the National League Championship Series. The Division Series consists of two best-of-five series, featuring the three division winners and the winner of the wild-card play-off.

New York Mets

The New York Mets are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of Queens. The Mets compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. The Mets are one of two Major League clubs based in New York City; the other is the New York Yankees of the American League East.

One of baseball's first expansion teams, the Mets were founded in 1962 to replace New York's departed NL teams, the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. The Mets' colors are composed of the Dodgers' blue and the Giants' orange, which also form the outer two bands of the New York City flag. During the 1962 and 1963 seasons, the Mets played their home games at the Polo Grounds. From 1964 to 2008, the Mets' home ballpark was Shea Stadium. In 2009, they moved into their current ballpark, Citi Field.In their 1962 inaugural season, the Mets posted a record of 40–120, the worst regular season record since MLB went to a 162-game schedule (two games were canceled). The team never finished better than second to last until the 1969 "Miracle Mets" beat the Baltimore Orioles in the 1969 World Series in what is considered one of the biggest upsets in World Series history. Since then, they have played in four additional World Series, including a dramatic run in 1973 that ended in a seven-game loss to the Oakland Athletics, a second championship in 1986 over the Boston Red Sox, a Subway Series loss against their cross-town rivals the New York Yankees in 2000, and a five-game loss to the Kansas City Royals in 2015.

The Mets qualified to play in the Major League Baseball postseason in 1988 and 2006, coming within one game of the World Series both years. After near-misses in 2007 and 2008, the Mets made the playoffs in 2015 for the first time in nine years, and won their first NL pennant in 15 years. The team again returned to the playoffs in 2016, this time with a wild card berth. This was the team's second back-to-back playoff appearance, the first occurring during the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

As of the end of the 2018 MLB season, the Mets overall win-loss record is 4362–4732, good for a .480 win percentage.

New York Yankees

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City; the other club is the National League (NL)'s New York Mets. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles (no relation to the modern Baltimore Orioles). Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise that had ceased operations and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.The team is owned by Yankee Global Enterprises, an LLC that is controlled by the family of the late George Steinbrenner, who purchased the team in 1973. Brian Cashman is the team's general manager, and Aaron Boone is the team's field manager. The team's home games were played at the original Yankee Stadium from 1923 to 1973 and from 1976 to 2008. In 1974 and 1975, the Yankees shared Shea Stadium with the Mets, in addition to the New York Jets, and New York Giants. In 2009, they moved into a new ballpark of the same name that was constructed next door to the previous facility, which was closed and demolished. The team is perennially among the leaders in MLB attendance.

The Yankees are arguably the most successful professional sports team in the United States; they have won 40 AL pennants, and 27 World Series championships, all of which are MLB records. The Yankees have won more titles than any other franchise in the four major North American sports leagues. Forty-four Yankees players and eleven Yankees managers have been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, including Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, and Whitey Ford. In pursuit of winning championships, the franchise has used a large payroll to attract talent, particularly during the Steinbrenner era. According to Forbes, the Yankees are the second highest valued sports franchise in the United States and the fifth in the world, with an estimated value of approximately $4 billion. The Yankees have garnered enormous popularity and a dedicated fanbase, as well as widespread enmity from fans of other MLB teams. The team's rivalry with the Boston Red Sox is one of the most well-known rivalries in U.S. sports.

From 1903–2018, the Yankees' overall win-loss record is 10,275–7,781 (a .569 winning percentage).

World Series

The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) in North America, contested since 1903 between the American League (AL) champion team and the National League (NL) champion team. The winner of the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff, and the winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. As the series is played during the fall season in North America, it is sometimes referred to as the Fall Classic.Prior to 1969, the team with the best regular season win-loss record in each league automatically advanced to the World Series; since then each league has conducted a championship series (ALCS and NLCS) preceding the World Series to determine which teams will advance. As of 2018, the World Series has been contested 114 times, with the AL winning 66 and the NL winning 48.

The 2018 World Series took place between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Boston Red Sox from October 23–28, with the Red Sox winning in five games to earn their ninth title. This was the first World Series meeting between these two teams since 1916. Having previously lost to the Houston Astros in the 2017 World Series, the Dodgers became the 11th team to lose the World Series in consecutive seasons.In the American League, the New York Yankees have played in 40 World Series and won 27, the Philadelphia/Kansas City/Oakland Athletics have played in 14 and won 9, and the Boston Red Sox have played in 13 and won 9, including the first World Series. In the National League, the St. Louis Cardinals have appeared in 19 and won 11, the New York/San Francisco Giants have played in 19 and won 8, the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers have appeared in 20 and won 6, and the Cincinnati Reds have appeared in 9 and won 5.

As of 2018, no team has won consecutive World Series championships since the New York Yankees in 1998, 1999, and 2000—the longest such drought in Major League Baseball history.

Until 2002, home-field advantage in the World Series alternated from year to year between the National League and American League. From 2003 to 2016, home-field advantage was given to the league that won that year's All-Star Game. Starting in 2017, home-field advantage is awarded to the league champion team with the better regular season win-loss record.

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