List of Washington Redskins head coaches

This is a complete list of Washington Redskins head coaches. There have been 28 head coaches for the Washington Redskins, including coaches for the Boston Redskins (1933–1936) and Boston Braves (1932), of the National Football League (NFL). The Redskins franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.[1]

Joe Gibbs is the only coach to have more than one tenure.[2] Two different coaches have won NFL championships with the team: Ray Flaherty in 1937 and 1942, and Joe Gibbs in 1982, 1987 and 1991.[3] Gibbs is the all-time leader in games coached and wins, and Dudley DeGroot leads all coaches in winning percentage with .737 (with at least one full season coached).[4] Mike Nixon is statistically the worst coach the Redskins have had in terms of winning percentage, with .182.[5]

Of the 28 Redskins coaches, seven have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including Ray Flaherty, Turk Edwards, Curly Lambeau, Otto Graham, Vince Lombardi, George Allen and Joe Gibbs.[6] Several former players have been head coach for the Redskins, including Turk Edwards, Dick Todd, Jack Pardee and Richie Petitbon. In addition, former players have become assistant coaches, such as Earnest Byner, Russ Grimm, and Keenan McCardell. On January 5, 2010 the Redskins hired former Denver Broncos and Oakland Raiders coach Mike Shanahan. Shanahan went 24–40 during four seasons in charge, before he was fired on December 30, 2013.[7]

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George Allen was the head coach of the Redskins from 1971 to 1977 and was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2002.

Coaches

CurlyLambeauNotreDame

Curly Lambeau was the head coach of the Redskins from 1952 to 1953. He was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963.

Lone Star Dietz was the head coach of the Redskins from 1933 to 1934.

Joe Gibbs at Dept of Education event, cropped

Joe Gibbs was the head coach of the Redskins from 1981 to 1992 and, again from 2004 to 2007. He was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1996.

Marty Schottenheimer-Aug-11-2006-Autograph

Marty Schottenheimer was the head coach of the Redskins in 2001.

Steve Spurrier 2006-09-02

Steve Spurrier was the head coach of the Redskins from 2002 to 2003.

Jim Zorn

Jim Zorn was the head coach of the Redskins from 2008 to 2009.

References

  1. ^ "Washington Redskins (1937-present)". Sportsecyclopedia. Retrieved 2008-03-14.
  2. ^ a b c "Joe Gibbs' Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2008-03-14.
  3. ^ "Washington Redskins Championship History". NFLTeamHistory.com. Archived from the original on 2008-04-22. Retrieved 2008-03-14.
  4. ^ a b "Dudley DeGroot's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2008-02-21. Retrieved 2008-03-14.
  5. ^ a b "Mike Nixon's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2008-03-14.
  6. ^ "Hall of Famers by Franchise". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 14, 2008.
  7. ^ Wesseling, Chris (December 30, 2013). "Washington Redskins fire Mike Shanahan". National Football League. NFL Enterprises LLC. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  8. ^ "Lud Wray's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-11-07. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  9. ^ "Lone Star Dietz's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  10. ^ "Eddie Casey's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  11. ^ "Ray Flaherty's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-08-31. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  12. ^ "Dutch Bergman's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  13. ^ "Turk Edwards' Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  14. ^ "John Whelchel's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  15. ^ "Herman Ball's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  16. ^ "Dick Todd's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-11-07. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  17. ^ "Curly Lambeau's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2008-03-22.
  18. ^ a b c "NFL Coach of the Year Award". Hickok Sports. Archived from the original on December 5, 2012. Retrieved March 22, 2008.
  19. ^ "Joe Kuharich's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  20. ^ "Bill McPeak's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-11-07. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  21. ^ "Otto Graham's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  22. ^ "Vince Lombardi's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-06-29. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  23. ^ "Bill Austin's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  24. ^ "George Allen's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  25. ^ "Jack Pardee's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  26. ^ "Richie Petitbon's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  27. ^ "Norv Turner's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-08-20. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  28. ^ "Terry Robiskie's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  29. ^ "Marty Schottenheimer's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  30. ^ "Steve Spurrier's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  31. ^ "Jim Zorn's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 2012-10-20. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  32. ^ "Mike Shanahan's Coaching Record". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-04.
  33. ^ "Jay Gruden". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
Steve Spurrier

Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945) is an American football head ball coach and former player who is currently the head coach of the Orlando Apollos of the Alliance of American Football. Spurrier was born in Miami Beach, Florida and grew up in Tennessee, where he was a multi-sport all-state athlete at Science Hill High School in Johnson City. He attended the University of Florida, where he won the 1966 Heisman Trophy as a college football quarterback with the Florida Gators. The San Francisco 49ers picked him in the first round of the 1967 NFL draft, and he spent a decade playing professionally in the National Football League (NFL), mainly as a backup quarterback and punter. Spurrier was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1986.

After retiring as a player, Spurrier went into coaching and spent several years as an assistant at several college programs, including at Duke University, where he began to develop his innovative offensive system while serving as the Blue Devil's offensive coordinator in the early 1980s. He was hired to his first head coaching job by the Tampa Bay Bandits of the United States Football League (USFL) in 1983. The USFL folded after three seasons, and Spurrier returned to the college ranks, serving as the head football coach at Duke (3 seasons), Florida (12 seasons), and South Carolina (10.5 seasons). Between his stints at Florida and South Carolina, he led the National Football League's Washington Redskins for two seasons. Spurrier retired from coaching in 2015 and became an ambassador and consultant for the University of Florida's athletic department. In 2019, he will return to the sideline as the head coach the Orlando Apollos of the Alliance of American Football.

Spurrier's teams were known for winning with high-scoring offenses, and the "head ball coach" also became known for teasing and "needling" rivals both before and after beating them on the field. He is the winningest coach in both Florida and South Carolina program history, and his last Duke squad won the program's only Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) championship over the last half-century in 1989. Florida's four consecutive Southeastern Conference (SEC) championships in the mid-1990s is the second-longest streak in conference history behind Bear Bryant's 1970s Alabama teams. Spurrier and Bryant are the only coaches to hold the record for most conference wins at two different SEC schools, and Spurrier is second to Bryant in total career wins while leading an SEC program. When Florida quarterback Danny Wuerffel won the Heisman Trophy during the Gators' 1996 national championship season, Spurrier became the only Heisman Trophy winner to coach another Heisman Trophy winner. Spurrier was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2017, making him one of four members to be inducted as both a player and a coach. In September 2016, the University of Florida officially renamed the Gators' home field to Steve Spurrier-Florida Field at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium.

Franchise
Stadiums
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Division championships (14)
Conference championships (5)
League championships (5)
Hall of Fame players
All-time leaders
Current league affiliations
Seasons (88)
Boston Braves / Boston Redskins / Washington Redskins head coaches

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