List of U.S. state mammals

A state mammal is the official mammal of a U.S. state as designated by a state's legislature. Many states also have separately officially designated state animals, state birds, state fish, state butterflies, and state reptiles. States similarly have state flowers, state trees and state songs.

State mammals

Key: Years in parentheses denote the year of adoption by the state's legislature.

Bigbullmoose
Moose (land mammal) (1998)[2]
Sperm whale pod
Sperm whale (state animal) (1975)[6]
FL fig04
Manatee (marine mammal) (1975)[7]
Tursiops truncatus 01
"Porpoise or dolphin" (salt water mammal) (1975)[8]
Lasiurus cinereus semotus crop
Hawaiian hoary bat (land mammal) (2015)[12]
Deer Night
White-tailed deer (game mammal) (1997)[15]
Fox - British Wildlife Centre (17429406401)
Red fox (1997)[17]
Perdido Bay Dolphin 2007
Bottlenosed dolphin (1974) (water mammal)[16]
Tadarida brasiliensis
Mexican Free-tailed Bat (flying mammal) (2006)[22]
Nordkaper
Right whale (migratory marine mammal) (2009)[24]
Armadillo1
Nine-banded armadillo (small mammal) (1995)[25]
Texas Longhorn Steer Rocksprings
Texas Longhorn (large mammal) (1995)[25]
Tadarida brasiliensis
Mexican Free-tailed Bat (flying mammal) (1995)[25]
Killerwhales jumping
Orca (2005)[26]

See also

References

  1. ^ "State Mammal of Alabama". Alabama Emblems, Symbols and Honors. Alabama Department of Archives & History. 2006-04-20. Retrieved 2007-03-19.
  2. ^ a b "Alaska's Kids' Corner: State Symbols". State of Alaska. Retrieved 2012-04-27.
  3. ^ "Arizona's State Symbols". Capitol Museum. Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records. Archived from the original on 2011-09-08. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  4. ^ "State Symbols". The Traveler's Guide To Arkansas For Kids. Arkansas Secretary of State. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  5. ^ "History and Culture - State Symbols". California State Library. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  6. ^ "The State Animal". State of Connecticut. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  7. ^ "Florida State Senate: Symbols: Page 4". Flsenate.gov. Retrieved 2012-04-20.
  8. ^ "Florida State Senate: Symbols, Page 3". Flsenate.gov. Retrieved 2012-04-20.
  9. ^ Allen, David G. (May 19, 2015). "White-Tailed Deer Named State Mammal of Georgia". State of Georgia. Retrieved January 23, 2016.
  10. ^ a b Shearer, Benjamin F. & Barbara S. Shearer. State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002. 230.
  11. ^ Char, Sherie (June 15, 2008). "Hawaiian monk seal named Hawaii's state mammal". Hawai'i Magazine. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  12. ^ Hawaii State Legislature. "Haw. Rev. Stat. § 5-12.2 (State land mammal)". Retrieved Jan 26, 2018.
  13. ^ "Louisiana State Mammal". State Symbols USA. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  14. ^ "Massachusetts Secretary of State: State Symbols". Sec.state.ma.us. Retrieved 2012-04-20.
  15. ^ Shearer, Benjamin F. & Barbara S. Shearer. State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002. 234.
  16. ^ a b Shearer, Benjamin F. & Barbara S. Shearer. State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002. 235.
  17. ^ "Mississippi State Mammal". State Symbols USA. Retrieved 2018-01-26.
  18. ^ Shearer, Benjamin F. & Barbara S. Shearer. State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002. 236.
  19. ^ "New Mexico State Symbols". New Mexico Secretary of State's Office. Retrieved 2018-04-21.
  20. ^ "North Carolina State Symbols". North Carolina Secretary of State's Office. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  21. ^ Shearer, Benjamin F. & Barbara S. Shearer. State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002. 239.
  22. ^ "Oklahoma State Symbols". Oklahoma Historical Society. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  23. ^ Gregg, Katherine. "It's official: Harbor seal is R.I.'s state mammal". providencejournal.com. Retrieved 2018-01-06.
  24. ^ a b "South Carolina State House Student Connection: Animals & Other Living Things". South Carolina General Assembly. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
  25. ^ a b c Shearer, Benjamin F. & Barbara S. Shearer. State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002. 242.
  26. ^ "State Symbols". Washington State Legislature. Retrieved 2011-09-02.

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