List of U.S. state foods

This is a list of official U.S. state foods:

Mandel Gr 99
Pecan-nuts-on-tree
Mandel Gr 99
Pecan-nuts-on-tree
Refried beans-frijoles refritos
Refried beans-frijoles refritos
CountryFriedSteak
Bucket of raw okra pods
YellowSquash
Skillet cornbread 1
Grits 1
VegCorn
Biscuits-and-gravy
Black-eyed-pea-closeup
Pecan pie slice
CountryFriedSteak
Bucket of raw okra pods
YellowSquash
Skillet cornbread 1
Grits 1
VegCorn
Biscuits-and-gravy
Black-eyed-pea-closeup
Pecan pie slice

Notes

  1. ^ In a proclamation as acting governor, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom declared the artichoke state vegetable, the avocado state fruit, the almond state nut, and rice state grain. The legislature did not enact these.
  2. ^ Georgia declared peanuts the state crop.
  3. ^ Hawaii's official state plant is kalo (Colocasia esculenta; taro).
  4. ^ New Mexico's official state question, "Red or green?", refers to chilies. The official answer is, "Red and green, or Christmas."
  5. ^ In 2003, Texas law made sopaipilla and strudel state pastries until 2005.

See also

References

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  3. ^ "State Tree Fruit of Alabama". Alabama Emblems, Symbols and Honors. Alabama Department of Archives and History. 2006-04-20. Retrieved 2007-03-18.
  4. ^ "Lane Cake Named Official State Dessert by Alabama Lawmakers". 2016-04-30. Retrieved 2016-04-30.
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  8. ^ Teske, Steven (March 8, 2018). "Official State Grain—aka: Rice". The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture. The Central Arkansas Library System. Retrieved 2018-07-27.
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External links

Bizcochito

Biscochitos or bizcochitos are a crisp lard- or butter-based cookie, flavored with cinnamon and anise. The name is a Spanish diminutive form of bizcocho. The dough is rolled and traditionally cut into the shape of stars and crescent moons.

The cookie was developed by residents of New Mexico over the centuries from the first Spanish colonists of what was then known as Santa Fe de Nuevo México. The recipe for making the cookie has been greatly influenced not only by local and indigenous customs but also by recipes brought to New Mexico by immigrants from other Hispanic countries.

Biscochitos are served during special celebrations, such as wedding receptions, baptisms, and religious holidays (especially during the Christmas season). It is commonly served along with hot chocolate. The cookie is seldom known outside the boundaries of the original Spanish province, although Spanish speakers may recognize the association with bizcocho, from the name, and may have some idea of what they must be, even if they have not encountered them before.

Natchitoches, Louisiana

Natchitoches ( NAK-ə-təsh; French: Les Natchitoches) is a small city and the parish seat of Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, United States. Established in 1714 by Louis Juchereau de St. Denis as part of French Louisiana, the community was named after the indigenous Natchitoches people.

The City of Natchitoches was not incorporated until after Louisiana had become a state (1812), on February 5, 1819. It is the oldest permanent settlement in the region. Natchitoches' sister city is Nacogdoches, Texas. It is also the location of Northwestern State University.

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