List of St. Louis Cardinals in the Baseball Hall of Fame

The St. Louis Cardinals, a Major League baseball (MLB) franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, have competed in the National League (NL) since 1892, and in the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891.[a] They have won 11 World Series titles, one additional interleague championship and were co-champions (tied) in another prior to the modern World Series. Known as the Cardinals from 1900 to the present, the St. Louis franchise were also known as the Brown Stockings (1882), Browns (1883–98), and Perfectos (1899).[2] A total of 37 players and other personnel associated with the Cardinals have been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York.

The first former Cardinals players to be inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame were John McGraw and Cy Young in 1937, the second year of the Museum's annual balloting. Rogers Hornsby was the first to be inducted as Cardinal, which occurred in 1942. Of the 37 former Cardinals elected to the Hall of Fame, 17 have been inducted as Cardinals and nine with the Cardinals logo on their cap. The latest former Cardinals personnel to be inducted were Tony La Russa and Joe Torre, which occurred in 2014.

In addition, two separate awards – the Ford Frick Award and J. G. Taylor Spink Award – while not conferring the status of enshrining their recipients as members of the Hall of Fame, honor the works of a total of six sportswriters and broadcasters in connection with their coverage of the Cardinals.[3][4] The Cardinals also have a franchise hall of fame known as the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum located within Ballpark Village adjacent to Busch Stadium, the Cardinals' home stadium.[5]

Part of the
National Baseball Hall of Fame
and Museum
Established1936 (dedicated June 12, 1939)
LocationCooperstown, New York
Coordinates42°42′01″N 74°55′25″W / 42.700322°N 74.92369°W
TypeProfessional sports hall of fame
Visitors300,000/year (average as of 2013)[1]
DirectorJeff Idelson (since 2008)
Websitebaseballhall.org

Key

dagger Inducted as a Cardinal.[6] Names listed in bold are depicted on their Hall of Fame plaques wearing a Cardinals cap insignia.
Ω Spent more years with the Cardinals than any other team, though not inducted as a Cardinal

Inductees

Member Years as Cardinal Role(s) Year inducted Method Notable achievement(s) as a Cardinal Ref(s)
Grover Cleveland Alexander[b] 1926–29 Player 1938 BBWAA 1926 World Series champion
55–38 W–L, 3.08 ERA
[7]
Walter Alston 1936 Manager 1983 VC [8]
Jake Beckley[b] 1904–07 Player 1971 VC [9]
Jim Bottomley[b]dagger 1922–32 Player 1974 VC 1926 and 1931 World Series champion
1928 NL MVP
.325 batting average (AVG),
.537 slugging percentage (SLG) in 11 seasons
[10]
Roger Bresnahan[b] 1909–12 Player 1945 OTC Player/manager, batted .275 [11]
Lou Brockdagger 1964–79 Player 1985 BBWAA 1964 and 1967 World Series champion
#2 MLB in stolen bases (938)
3,000 hit club
[12]
Mordecai Brown[b] 1903 Player 1949 OTC [13]
Jesse Burkett[d] 1899–1901 Player 1946 OTC .378 in three seasons (highest in franchise history)
1901 batting title (.376)
[14][15]
Steve Carlton 1965–71 Player 1994 BBWAA 1967 World Series champion
77–62 W–L, 3.10 ERA
[16]
Orlando Cepeda 1966–68 Player 1999 VC 1967 NL MVP and World Series winner [17]
Charles Comiskey[b] 1882–89, 1891 Pion./Exec. 1939 OTC 1886 World Series champion
Four AA pennants
.673 win% (Highest for St. Louis managers)
[18][19]
Roger Connor[b] 1894–97 Player 1976 VC [20]
Dizzy Deandagger 1930–37 Player 1953 BBWAA 1934 MVP and World Series winner
4x NL strikeout, 2x wins, 2x shutouts champion
[21]
Leo Durocher 1933–37 Manager 1994 VC [22]
Dennis Eckersley 1996–97 Player 2004 BBWAA [23]
Frankie Frisch[b]dagger 1927–37 Player 1947 BBWAA 1931 and 1934 World Series champion
1931 MVP
.312 average as Cardinal player/manager
[24][25]
Pud Galvin[b] 1875, 1892 Player 1965 VC [26]
Bob Gibsondagger 1959–75 Player 1981 BBWAA 1964 and 1967 World Series champion
1968 and 1970 Cy Young Award winner
1.12 ERA (modern record) and MVP in 1968
18 Cardinals career pitching records
[27][28]
Burleigh Grimes 1930–34 Player 1964 VC [29]
Chick Hafey[b]dagger 1924–31 Player 1971 VC .326 AVG, .568 SLG in eight seasons [30]
Jesse Haines[b]dagger 1920–37 Player 1970 VC 1926, 1931 and 1934 World Series champion
Second in wins (210), IP (3203.2),
and 5th in ShO (23) in franchise history
[28][31]
Whitey Herzogdagger 1980, 1981–90 Manager 2010 VC 1982 World Series champion and three NL pennants
822 wins (Third in franchise history)
.530 winning percentage
1985 NL Manager of the Year
[19][32]
Rogers Hornsby[b]dagger 1915–26, 1933 Player 1942 BBWAA 1926 World Series champion
Two batting Triple Crowns
Six consecutive batting titles
.400 batting average
Second-highest career MLB batting average (.358)
[33]
Miller Huggins 1910–17 Manager 1964 VC .402 on-base percentage
Player/manager
[34][35]
Tony La RussaΩ 1996–2011 Manager 2014 VC 2006 and 2011 World Series champion
Three NL pennants
1408 wins (Most in franchise history)
2002 NL Manager of the Year
[19][36]
Rabbit Maranville 1927–28 Player 1954 BBWAA [37]
Bill McKechnie 1928–29 Manager 1962 VC 1928 NL pennant [38]
John McGraw 1900 Manager 1937 VC .344 AVG, .505 OBP in 1900 [39]
Joe Medwick[b]dagger 1932–40
1947–48
Player 1968 BBWAA 1937 NL Triple Crown and MVP
.335 batting average (Fifth in franchise history) in 11 seasons
[15][40]
Johnny Mize[b]dagger 1936–41 Player 1981 VC 1939 NL batting title (.349)
1.018 OPS in six seasons (Third in franchise history)
[15][41]
Stan Musialdagger 1941–63 Player 1969 BBWAA 1942, 1944 and 1946 World Series champion
Three MVPs, seven batting titles
3,000 hit club
More than 20 Cardinals career batting records
[15][42]
Kid Nichols[b] 1904–05 Player 1949 OTC Player/manager
2.02 ERA, 21 W, 317 IP in 1904
[43][44]
Branch RickeyΩ 1919–42 Pion./Exec 1967 VC Founded minor league farm system in use today [45][46]
Wilbert Robinson[b] 1900 Manager 1946 OTC [47]
Red Schoendienstdagger 1945–56
1961–63
Player 1989 VC 1946, 1964, 1967, 1982 World Series champion
9x All-Star
.289 batting average, 1980 hits
1,041 wins as manager (Second in franchise history)
[19][48][49]
Enos Slaughterdagger 1938–53 Player 1985 VC 1942 and 1946 World Series champion
.305 batting average, .847 OPS
10× All-Star
135 triples, 146 home runs
[50]
Ozzie Smithdagger 1982–96 Player 2002 BBWAA 1982 World Series champion
11× Gold Glove winner
14× All-Star
1985 NLCS MVP
[51]
John Smoltz 2009 Player 2015 BBWAA [52]
Billy Southworthdagger 1926–29
1940–45
Manager 2008 VC 1926, 1942 and 1944 World Series champion
Three NL pennants as manager
.642 W–L% (Second in franchise history)
[19][53][54]
Bruce Sutterdagger 1981–84 Player 2006 BBWAA 1982 World Series champion
3× NL saves leader, 127 saves, 2.72 ERA
[55]
Joe Torre 1969–74
1990–95
Manager 2014 VC 1971 MVP and batting champion (.363)
.498 winning percentage as manager
[56][57]
Dazzy Vance 1933, 1934 Player 1955 BBWAA [58]
Bobby Wallace[d] 1899–1901, 1917–18 Player 1953 VC [58]
Hoyt Wilhelm 1957 Player 1985 BBWAA [59]
Vic Willis[d] 1910 Player 1995 VC [60]
Cy Young 1899–1900 Player 1937 BBWAA 45–35, 2.78 ERA, 690.1 IP, 137 ERA+ [61]

Broadcasters and sportswriters

Ford C. Frick Award (broadcasters)
Recipient Years covering Cardinals Year awarded Stations / networks Ref(s)
Jack Buck 1954–2001 1987 KMOX, CBS (World Series) [62]
Harry Caray 1945–69 1989 WIL (AM), KMOX [63]
J. G. Taylor Spink Award (sportswriters)
Recipient Years covering Cardinals Year awarded Publications Ref(s)
Bob Broeg 1946–2004 1979 St. Louis Post-Dispatch, The Sporting News [64]
Rick Hummel 1971–present 2006 St. Louis Post-Dispatch [65]
J. G. Taylor Spink 1914–62 1962 The Sporting News [66]
J. Roy Stockton 1915–58 1972 St. Louis Post-Dispatch [67]

Artifacts

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum has collected artifacts related to notable achievements of Cardinals players, including:

References

Footnotes
Source notes
  1. ^ Idelson, Jeff. "Note from the president". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Archived from the original on April 11, 2012. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  2. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals team history & encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  3. ^ "Awards: Ford C. Frick". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  4. ^ "Awards: J. G. Taylor Spink". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  5. ^ Cardinals Press Release (January 18, 2014). "Cardinals establish Hall of Fame & detail induction process". www.stlouis.cardinals.mlb.com. Archived from the original on January 26, 2014. Retrieved January 29, 2014.
  6. ^ "Hall of Famers". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 13, 2014.
  7. ^ "Pete Alexander statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  8. ^ "Walter Alston statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  9. ^ "Jake Beckley statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  10. ^ "Jim Bottomley statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  11. ^ "Roger Bresnahan statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  12. ^ "Lou Brock statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  13. ^ "Mordecai Brown statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  14. ^ "Jesse Burkett statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  15. ^ a b c d "St. Louis Cardinals top 10 batting leaders". Baseball-Reference.com. February 14, 2014.
  16. ^ "Steve Carlton statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  17. ^ "Orlando Cepeda statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  18. ^ "Charles Comiskey managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  19. ^ a b c d e "St. Louis Cardinals managers". Baseball-Reference.com. February 14, 2014.
  20. ^ "Roger Connor statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  21. ^ "Dizzy Dean statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  22. ^ "Leo Durocher statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  23. ^ "Dennis Eckersley statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  24. ^ "Frankie Frisch statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  25. ^ "Frankie Frisch managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  26. ^ "Pud Galvin statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  27. ^ "Bob Gibson statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  28. ^ a b "St. Louis Cardinals top 10 pitching leaders". Baseball-Reference.com. February 14, 2014.
  29. ^ "Burleigh Grimes statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  30. ^ "Chick Hafey statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  31. ^ "Jesse Haines statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  32. ^ "Whitey Herzog managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  33. ^ "Rogers Hornsby statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  34. ^ "Miller Huggins statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  35. ^ "Miller Huggins managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  36. ^ "Tony La Russa managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  37. ^ "Rabbit Maranville statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  38. ^ "Bill McKechnie managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  39. ^ "John McGraw statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  40. ^ "Joe Medwick statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  41. ^ "Johnny Mize statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  42. ^ "Stan Musial statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  43. ^ "Kid Nichols statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  44. ^ "Kid Nichols managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  45. ^ "Rickey, Branch". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  46. ^ "Branch Rickey (American baseball executive)". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved March 8, 2014.
  47. ^ "Wilbert Robinson statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  48. ^ "Red Schoendienst statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  49. ^ "Red Schoendienst managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 14, 2014.
  50. ^ "Enos Slaughter statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  51. ^ "Ozzie Smith statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  52. ^ "John Smoltz statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved October 27, 2016.
  53. ^ "Billy Southworth statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  54. ^ "Billy Southworth managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  55. ^ "Bruce Sutter statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  56. ^ "Joe Torre statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  57. ^ "Joe Torre managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  58. ^ a b "Dazzy Vance statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
  59. ^ "Hoyt Wilhelm statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 10, 2014.
  60. ^ "Vic Willis statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 10, 2014.
  61. ^ "Cy Young statistics and history". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 10, 2014.
  62. ^ Hoffman, Jared (June 19, 2002). "Legendary voice passes away". MLB.com. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  63. ^ Sandomir, Richard (February 19, 1998). "Archives: Harry Caray, 78, colorful baseball announcer, dies". The New York Times. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  64. ^ "1979 J. G. Taylor Spink Award winner Bob Broeg". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 13, 2014.
  65. ^ "2006 J. G. Taylor Spink Award winner Rick Hummel". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 13, 2014.
  66. ^ "J. G. Taylor Spink". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 13, 2014.
  67. ^ "1972 J. G. Taylor Spink Award winner J. Roy Stockton". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 13, 2014.
  68. ^ a b c d e f g "St. Louis Cardinals". National Baseball Hall of Fame via archives. Archived from the original on June 10, 2007. Retrieved February 9, 2014.
St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum

The St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum is a team hall of fame located in downtown St. Louis, Missouri, representing the history, players and personnel of the professional baseball franchise St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). It is housed within Ballpark Village, a mixed-use development and adjunct of Busch Stadium, the home stadium of the Cardinals. To date, 43 members have been enshrined within the Cardinals Hall of Fame.

Stan Musial

Stanley Frank Musial (; born Stanisław Franciszek Musiał; November 21, 1920 – January 19, 2013), nicknamed Stan the Man, was an American baseball outfielder and first baseman. He spent 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, from 1941 to 1944 and 1946 to 1963. Widely considered to be one of the greatest and most consistent hitters in baseball history, Musial was a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969, and was also selected to the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014.

Musial batted .331 over the course of his career and set National League (NL) records for career hits (3,630), runs batted in (1,951), games played (3,026), at bats (10,972), runs scored (1,949) and doubles (725). His 475 career home runs then ranked second in NL history behind Mel Ott's total of 511. His 6,134 total bases remained a major league record until surpassed by Hank Aaron, and his hit total still ranks fourth all-time, and is the highest by any player who spent his career with only one team. A seven-time batting champion with identical totals of 1,815 hits at home and 1,815 hits on the road, he was named the National League's (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times and led St. Louis to three World Series championships. He also shares the major league record for the most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays. Musial was born in Donora, Pennsylvania, where he frequently played baseball informally or in organized settings, and eventually played on the baseball team at Donora High School.

Signed to a professional contract by the St. Louis Cardinals as a pitcher in 1938, Musial had arm problems and performed erratically on the mound for two seasons. On the recommendation of minor league manager Dickie Kerr, Musial was converted into an outfielder and made his major league debut in 1941.

Noted for his unique batting stance, he quickly established himself as a consistent and productive hitter. In his first full season, 1942, the Cardinals won the World Series. The following year, he led the NL in six different offensive categories and earned his first MVP award. He was also named to the NL All-Star squad for the first time; he appeared in every All-Star game in every subsequent season he played. Musial won his second World Series championship in 1944, then missed the entire 1945 season while serving in the Navy.

After completing his military service during the war, Musial returned to baseball in 1946 and resumed his consistent hitting. That year he earned his second MVP award and third World Series title. His third MVP award came in 1948, when he finished one home run short of winning baseball's Triple Crown. After struggling offensively in 1959, Musial used a personal trainer to help maintain his productivity until he decided to retire in 1963. At the time of his retirement, he held or shared 17 major league records, 29 National League records, and nine All-Star Game records. Ironically, in 1964, the season following his retirement, the Cardinals went on to defeat the New York Yankees in an epic 7-game clash, for St. Louis' first World Series championship in nearly two decades (a team which included future Hall of Famer Lou Brock performing what would have likely been Musial's left field duties). In addition to overseeing businesses, such as a restaurant both before and after his playing career, Musial served as the Cardinals' general manager in 1967, winning the pennant and World Series, then quitting that position. He also became noted for his harmonica playing, a skill he acquired during his playing career. Known for his modesty and sportsmanship, Musial was selected for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999. In February 2011, President Barack Obama presented Musial with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian awards that can be bestowed on a person by the United States government.

St. Louis Cardinals in the National Baseball Hall of Fame
Inducted as a Cardinal
Inductees who played
for the Cardinals
Cardinals managers
Cardinals executives
Frick Award
Spink Award
Franchise
History
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Key personnel
Minor league
affiliates
World Series
Championships
League pennants
Division titles
Wild card titles
All Star Games hosted

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