List of Procter & Gamble brands

Procter & Gamble (P&G) is an American consumer goods corporation with many globally marketed brands.

Brands with net sales of more than US$1 billion annually

As of 2015, the company stated it owned the following brands with net annual sales of more than $1 billion:[1]

  • Always menstrual hygiene products
  • Ariel laundry detergent
  • Bounty paper towels, sold in the United States and Canada
  • Charmin bathroom tissue and moist towelettes
  • Crest toothpaste
  • Dawn dishwashing
  • Downy fabric softener and dryer sheets
  • Fairy washing up liquid
  • Febreze odor eliminator
  • Gain laundry detergents, liquid fabric softener, dryer sheets and dish washing liquid
  • Gillette razors, shaving soap, shaving cream, body wash, shampoo, deodorant and anti-perspirant
  • Head & Shoulders shampoo
  • Olay personal and beauty products
  • Oral-B inter-dental products
  • Pampers & Pampers Kandoo disposable diapers and moist towelettes. The 2014 Financial Report lists Pampers as Procter & Gamble's largest brand.[2]
  • Pantene haircare products
  • SK-II beauty products
  • Tide laundry detergents and products
  • Vicks cough and cold products

Brands by product type

Dishwashing

  • Dawn dishwashing liquid
  • Joy dishwashing liquid
  • Gain dishwashing liquid
  • Ivory dishwashing liquid

Menstrual hygiene

  • Always menstrual hygiene products
  • Naturella menstrual hygiene products
  • Tampax tampons
  • Whisper menstrual hygiene products

Haircare

"Head and Shoulder"s ad
Head & Shoulders shampoo

Healthcare products

Household

Bar of Safeguard deodorant soap
A bar of Safeguard soap
  • Safeguard antibacterial soap brand[4] marketed by Procter & Gamble, introduced circa 1965. Safeguard soap is marketed under the brand name Escudo in Mexico.[5]
  • Tide detergents
  • Viakal cleaning products
  • Vizir laundry detergent
  • Swiffer cleaning products
  • Zevo insect control

Laundry detergents

  • Ariel laundry detergent
  • Bold laundry detergent
  • Bonux laundry detergent
  • Cheer laundry detergent
  • Daz laundry detergent
  • Downy fabric softener
  • Era laundry detergent
  • Dreft laundry detergent
  • Gain laundry detergent
  • Ola laundry soap
  • PMC laundry soap
  • Tide laundry detergent

Skin care

  • Fresco bar soap
  • High Endurance body washes, deodorants by Old Spice
  • Ivory bar soap
  • Olay skin care products (acquired in 1985 as part of Richardson-Vicks Inc.)
  • Old Spice aftershave, skin care and hair care products (acquired Shulton, Inc. in 1990)
  • Secret antiperspirants and deodorants
  • Zirh skin care business sold
  • SK-II (Japanese premium skin care)

Divested brands

Brands owned by Procter & Gamble in the past, but since divested:

  • Actonel (pharmaceutical division was spun off into Warner Chilcott in 2009)
  • Aleve, naproxen sodium (NSAID) drug,[6] acquired by Bayer in 1997
  • Asacol
  • Attends line of incontinence and sanitary products. Sold to PaperPak in 1999.
  • Biz originally an enzyme-based laundry pre-soak, later a detergent booster, then an all-fabric bleach, sold to Redox Brands in 2000
  • Camay lightly scented bath soap
  • Chloraseptic throat medicine and lozenges sold to Prestige Brands.
  • Cinch all-purpose glass and surface cleaner, was sold to Shansby Group, a San Francisco investment firm, later acquired by Prestige Brands.
  • Clairol, formerly a personal products division of Procter & Gamble that makes hair coloring, hair spray, shampoo, hair conditioner, and styling products. It was sold to Coty, Inc. on October 1, 2016
  • Coast bar-soap brand sold to Dial Corporation in 2000. Dial now owned by Henkel, Coast brand now owned by High Ridge Brands.
  • Comet long-time P&G brand of cleanser owned now by Prestige Brands
  • Crisco (vegetable oil and shortening) sold to The J.M. Smucker Company
  • Crush/Hires/Sun Drop carbonated soft drinks (sold to Cadbury Schweppes in late 1980s)
  • Dantrium sold to JHP Pharmaceuticals and SpePharm
  • Doctor's Dermatologic Formula skincare — effective March 31, 2014, these TMs have been sold to Icedrops Limited
  • Dryel home dry-cleaning kit sold to The OneCARE Company.
  • Duncan Hines packaged cake mixes, sold to Aurora Foods (now Pinnacle Foods) in 1998
  • Duracell batteries sold to Berkshire Hathaway in 2016.[7]
  • Fisher Nuts sold to John B. Sanfilippo and Son, Inc. in 1995
  • Fit fruit and vegetable cleaning wash licensed to HealthPro Brands in January 2004
  • Folgers coffee was acquired by The J.M. Smucker Company based in Orrville, Ohio in June 2008.
  • Frymax shortening (sold to ACH in 2001)
  • Gleem toothpaste
  • Hawaiian Punch now owned by Dr Pepper/7up
  • Iams cat and dog foods now owned by Mars Corporation.
  • Infacare baby wash, sold to Ceuta Healthcare Limited effective March 1, 2012.
  • Infusium 23 (shampoos/conditioners) sold to Helen of Troy Limited's Idelle Labs unit in March 2009
  • Jif (peanut butter) divested by Procter & Gamble in a spin-off to their stockholders, followed by an immediate merger with The J.M. Smucker Company in 2002
  • Lava sold to WD-40 in 1999
  • Lilt Home Permanents, including "Push Button" Lilt, The First "Foam-In" Home Permanent In A Can. Sold To Schwartzkopf/DEP in 1987, later discontinued
  • Mayon cooking oil
  • Millstone coffee was acquired by The J.M. Smucker Company as part of its Folger's coffee acquisition in Orrville, Ohio in June 2008.
  • Monchel beauty soap
  • Noxzema skin cream and beauty products line sold to Alberto-Culver in 2008
  • Oxydol sold to Redox Brands in 2000; Oxydol was P&G's first popular laundry soap, then later became a laundry detergent after Tide was introduced in 1946.
  • Perla bar soap sold to SCPG Asia-Pacific
  • Pert Plus was sold to Innovative Brands, LLC in July 2006.
  • PG Tips tea; now owned by Unilever.
  • Prell shampoo sold to Prestige Brands International in 1999
  • Primex shortening (sold to ACH in 2001)
  • Pringles potato chips sold to Kellogg Company in June 2012[8]
  • Pur (brand) brand of water filtration products. The brand as acquired from Recovery Engineering, Inc. in 1999 for approximately US$213 million. P&G sold Pur to Helen of Troy in January 2012 for an undisclosed amount.[9]
  • Purico shortening
  • Royale (Canada) brand of toilet paper. The original product was merged into the Charmin brand; Irving Tissue then acquired the trademark and re-introduced the brand on its own products.
  • Salvo brand of detergent tablets which was sold from around 1958 up to circa February 8, 1974[10]
  • Spic and Span now owned by The Spic and Span Company, a division of Prestige Brands
  • Star Margarine and Dari Creme originally from P&G Philippines, was sold to the Magnolia division of San Miguel Corporation in 1994.
  • Sunny Delight orange drink spun off in 2004.
  • Sunshine margarine
  • Sure anti-perspirant/deodorant line was sold in October 2006 to brand-development firm Innovative Brands
  • ThermaCare brand heat wraps sold to medical company Wyeth in 2008
  • Thrill a peach-scented brand of dishwashing liquid, discontinued after 1973.
  • Top Job all-purpose cleaner merged into the Mr. Clean brand in 1990
  • Victor shortening
  • Wash & Go haircare sold to Conter S.r.l. effective June 30, 2015
  • Wella, Clairol, Covergirl Makeup sold to Coty Inc (2016)[11]
  • Whirl butter flavored oil (sold to ACH in 2001)
  • Wondra brand of hand lotion sold from 1976 to 1989.
  • Zest deodorant body bar and body washes sold to High Ridge Brands Co. on January 4, 2011[12]

Discontinued brands

Brands owned by Procter & Gamble in the past, but since phased out:

  • Agro Laundry Soap
  • Banner, Summit, and White Cloud toilet tissues were merged with the company's best known bathroom tissue, Charmin. White Cloud is now sold exclusively in Walmart stores in the U.S.
  • Big Top, brand of peanut butter before Jif made its debut.
  • Blossom, facial soap
  • Bonus, brand of laundry detergent that had children's books or towels in every box; sold from 1940s to 1977.
  • Chipso, flaked and granulated soap, last made in the early-mid-1940s.
  • Citrus Hill, orange juice drink sold from 1983 to 1992
  • Drene (a.k.a. Special Drene, Royal Drene), liquid shampoo. First shampoo made from synthetic detergent.
  • Duz, powdered laundry soap and later, a powdered laundry detergent which had glassware and plates in each box; sold from 1940s to 1980.
  • Encaprin, coated aspirin[6]
  • Fling, disposable dishcloth brand.
  • Fluffo, golden yellow shortening sold mid-1950s to early 1960s.
  • Fresco bath soap
  • Gleem, toothpaste last made in 2014. Procter and Gamble plans to sell the Gleem formulation under the brand name Crest Fresh and White.
  • Hidden Magic, aerosol hair spray dubbed "the Titanic of the hair-spray business", sold in mid-1960s
  • High Point instant decaffeinated coffee, which had Lauren Bacall in its commercials; produced from 1974 to 1986.
  • Ivory Flakes, P&G's first soap packaged in boxes, sold from 1910 to 1977.
  • Monchel, beauty soap
  • Nutri Delight, an instant orange juice drink, sold in the Philippines from 1999 to 2000.
  • OK, economy bar and packaged laundry soap.
  • P&G White Laundry Soap, white bar soap made during World War I and World War II that temporarily replaced P&G White Naphtha Soap when naphtha was used for the war effort.
  • P&G White Naphtha Soap, white naphtha bar soap used for washing the laundry and dishes.
  • Pace & SELF "No-Lotion" home permanents
  • Physique hair care line (shampoos, conditioners, styling aids), phased out c. 2005
  • Pin-It, pin curl home permanent, sold mid-1950s.
  • Purico
  • Puritan oil (the first brand to sell canola oil, later merged into the Crisco oil brand)
  • Rejoice, liquid soap, produced to 1982.
  • Rely, super-absorbent tampons in production from 1976 to 1980. It was pulled off the market during the TSS crisis of the early 1980s.
  • Salvo, first concentrated tablet laundry detergent, which was discontinued c. February 8, 1974; later a dish detergent (sold in the U.S. 2004-2005; it is still sold in Latin America)
  • Selox, puffed soap sold in 1920s and 1930s.
  • Shasta, cream shampoo sold late 1940s-mid-1950s.
  • Solo, liquid laundry detergent with fabric softener that was later merged into the Bold brand, and sold from 1979 to 1990.
  • Star Soap and Star Naphtha Soap Chips
  • Stardust, dry chlorine bleach (extensively test-marketed during the 1960s)
  • Sunshine Margarine
  • Teel, liquid dentifrice sold late 1930s to late 1940s.[13]
  • Tempo, brand of dry wipes, produced from 2000 to 2010.
  • Tender Leaf, tea brand sold from 1940s to 1975.
  • Thrill, dishwashing liquid last made in 1973
  • Torengos, stackable, triangular-shaped, corn-based snack chip sold 2001-2003
  • Venus Shortening
  • Wondra lotion for dry skin. There were many formulas. (The first major brand to use "silicones") Sold from 1976 to 1989.

References

  1. ^ "P&G at a glance". Procter & Gamble. Retrieved March 3, 2016.
  2. ^ http://www.pginvestor.com/interactive/lookandfeel/4004124/PG_Annual_Report_2014.pdf
  3. ^ New Chapter Official: Vitamins & Herbal Supplements Retrieved 2017-05-26.
  4. ^ O'Guinn, T.; Allen, C.; Semenik, R.J. (2008). Advertising and Integrated Brand Promotion. Cengage Learning. p. 286. ISBN 978-0-324-56862-2. Retrieved October 22, 2016.
  5. ^ Brunsman, Barrett J. (February 22, 2016). "P&G sells Escudo brand version of Safeguard soap to competitor Kimberly-Clark". Cincinnati Business Courier. Retrieved October 22, 2016.
  6. ^ a b Olmos, David R. (June 17, 1994). "Release of New Pain Reliever Spurs Analgesics Marketing War". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles.
  7. ^ Coolidge, Alexander (March 1, 2016). "Duracell leaves P&G fold". Cincinnati. Retrieved March 2, 2016.
  8. ^ "Bidding Farewell To A P&G Original". Procter & Gamble Newsroom. May 31, 2012. Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  9. ^ http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9S1G9Q80.htm
  10. ^ "Selling Detergents One Load at a Time". Chemical & Engineering News. January 23, 2012. Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  11. ^ "P&G sells off another brand". Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  12. ^ http://www.canadianbusiness.com/markets/cnw/article.jsp?content=20110104_134503_2_cnw_cnw
  13. ^ "Teel Protects Teeth..... Beautifully!".
Gleam

Gleam may refer to:

reflectivity

John Procter (politician)

John Procter (born 7 November 1966) is a British politician.

Born in Leeds, Procter joined the Conservative Party. In 1992, he was elected to Leeds City Council, representing Wetherby ward until he was de-selected by party members in September 2017 and replaced by Wetherby Town Mayor, Norma Harrington. Procter served on Leeds City Council for 26 years, latterly as Deputy Leader of the Conservative Group, during which time he also ran a facilities management company called Strategic Facilities Management Ltd.Procter was third on the party's list for Yorkshire and the Humber at the European Parliament election, 2014. Although only the top candidate, Timothy Kirkhope, was elected, Kirkhope was appointed to the House of Lords in 2016. The party decided to appoint Procter as his replacement, rather than Alex Story, who had been second on the party list.

Lists of brands

This is an index of brand-related list articles on Wikipedia.

Lists of corporate assets

This page is an index for lists of some assets owned by large corporations.

Olay

Olay, previously Oil of Olay or Oil of Ulay, is an American skin care line. It is one of Procter & Gamble's multibillion-dollar brands. For the 2009 fiscal year, which ended on June 30, Olay accounted for an estimated $2.8 billion of P&G's $79 billion in revenue.

Oral-B

Oral-B is a brand of oral hygiene products, including toothpastes, toothbrushes, electric toothbrushes, and mouthwashes. The brand has been in business since the invention of the Hutson toothbrush in 1950. The brand has been owned by American multinational Procter & Gamble (P&G) since 2006.

Shantanu Khosla

Shantanu Khosla is an Indian business executive. He is the past Managing Director of Procter & Gamble India. As Managing Director, he was the country head of P&G for India and led operations for all three P&G companies in the country: two listed as Procter & Gamble Hygiene and Health Care Limited and Gillette India Limited, as well as a 100% subsidiary of the parent company called Procter & Gamble Home Products.Khosla is an alumnus of Indian Institute of Technology Bombay and Indian Institute of Management Calcutta. After completing his MBA from IIM Calcutta in 1983, he joined Richardson Hindustan Ltd. as a management trainee. He became a part of P&G when it acquired Richardson Hindustan in 1985. In his long tenure at P&G, Khosla has led several business units around the globe. He took over the leadership of India operations of the company in June 2002. He resigned from P&G effective 30 June 2015.Khosla is a member of the board of governors of Advertising Standards Council of India.

Umbrella brand

Umbrella branding (also known as family branding) is a marketing practice involving the use of a single brand name for the sale of two or more related products. Umbrella branding is mainly used by companies with a positive brand equity (value of a brand in a certain marketplace). All products use the same means of identification and lack additional brand names or symbols etc. This marketing practice differs from brand extension in that umbrella branding involves the marketing of similar products, rather than differentiated products, under one brand name. Hence, umbrella branding may be considered as a type of brand extension. The practice of umbrella branding does not disallow a firm to implement different branding approaches for different product lines (e.g. brand extension).

We Are Smarter Than Me

We Are Smarter Than Me is a collaborative-writing project using wiki software, whose initial goal was producing a book about decision making processes that use large numbers of people. The first book was published as a printed book, late in 2007, by the publishing conglomerate Pearson Education. Along with Pearson, the project's four core sponsors include research institutes of the MIT Sloan School of Management and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

The wiki book was featured in a November 28, 2006, broadcast of NPR's All Things Considered.

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