List of Philadelphia Phillies team records

The Philadelphia Phillies have participated in 127 seasons in Major League Baseball since their inception in 1883. Through 2009, they have played 19,035 games, winning 9,035 and losing 10,162, for a winning their tenure as members of Major League Baseball's National League.

Chuck Klein, the franchise's only batting Triple Crown winner, holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2009 season, with eight, including career slugging percentage, career on-base plus slugging (OPS), and single-season extra-base hits. He is followed by Billy Hamilton, who holds seven records, including career batting average and the single-season runs record.

Several Phillies hold National League and major league records. Pitcher/outfielder John Coleman is the most decorated in this category, holding three major league records, all from the franchise's inaugural season. Coleman set records for losses,[1] earned runs allowed,[2] and hits allowed,[3] all in 1883 when he also set three additional franchise pitching records. Shortstop Jimmy Rollins broke Willie Wilson's record for at-bats in a single season with 716 in 2007, and first baseman Ryan Howard also set the major league record for strikeouts in a single season that same year with 199, before it was broken by Mark Reynolds of the Arizona Diamondbacks the following year.[4] The 1930 Phillies, who went 52–102, set two more National League records, allowing 1,993 hits and 1,193 runs in the regular season.[5]

Mike Schmidt - Philadelphia Phillies
Mike Schmidt is the Phillies all time leader in home runs and RBIs

Individual career records

All statistics in this section are drawn from Baseball Reference using the following sources: batting statistics;[6] pitching statistics.[7]

Statistics are current through 2018 season.

RBI Run(s) batted in
ERA Earned run average[a]
OPS On-base percentage plus slugging percentage
* Tie between two or more players/teams
National League record
§ Major League record

Career batting

Statistic Player Record Phillies career Ref
Batting average Billy Hamilton .361 18901895 [8]
On-base percentage Billy Hamilton .468 18901895 [8]
Slugging percentage Chuck Klein .553 19281933
19361944
[9]
OPS Chuck Klein .935 19281933
19361944
[9]
Hits Jimmy Rollins 2,306 20002014 [10]
Total bases Mike Schmidt 4,404 19721989 [10]
Singles Richie Ashburn 1,811 19481959 [11]
Doubles Jimmy Rollins 457 20002014 [12]
Triples Ed Delahanty 157 18881889
18911901
[13]
Home runs Mike Schmidt 548 19721989 [10]
RBI Mike Schmidt 1,595 19721989 [10]
Bases on balls Mike Schmidt 1,507 19721989 [10]
Strikeouts Mike Schmidt 1,883 19721989 [10]
Stolen bases Billy Hamilton 508 18901895 [8]
Jimmy Rollins
Jimmy Rollins is the Phillies all time leader in hits.

Career pitching

Statistic Player Record Phillies career Ref
Wins Steve Carlton 241 19721986 [14]
Losses Robin Roberts 199 19481961 [15]
Win-loss percentage Grover Cleveland Alexander .676 19111917, 1930 [16]
ERA George McQuillan 1.79 19071911
19151916
[17]
Saves Jonathan Papelbon 123 20122015 [18]
Strikeouts Steve Carlton 3,031 19721986 [14]
Shutouts Grover Cleveland Alexander 61 19111917, 1930 [16]
Games Robin Roberts 529 19481961 [15]
Innings Robin Roberts 3,739⅓ 19481961 [15]
Games started Steve Carlton 499 19721986 [14]
Complete games Robin Roberts 272 19481961 [15]
Walks Steve Carlton 1,252 19721986 [14]
Hits allowed Robin Roberts 3,661 19481961 [15]
Wild pitches Steve Carlton 120 19721986 [14]
Hit batsmen Bill Duggleby 81 1898, 19011907 [19]
Steve Carlton - Philadelphia Phillies
Steve Carlton holds several records with the team, including most wins and strikeouts.

Individual single-season records

All statistics in this section are drawn from Baseball Reference using the following sources: batting statistics;[6] pitching statistics.[7]

Single-season batting

Statistic Player Record Season Ref
Batting average Ed Delahanty .410 1899 [13]
Home runs Ryan Howard 58 2006 [20]
RBI Chuck Klein 170 1930 [9][21]
Runs Billy Hamilton 192§ 1894 [8][22]
Hits Lefty O'Doul 254 1929 [23]
Singles Richie Ashburn 181* 1951 [11]
Singles Lefty O'Doul 181* 1929 [23]
Doubles Chuck Klein 59 1930 [9]
Triples Sam Thompson 28 1894 [24]
Stolen bases Billy Hamilton 111 1891 [8]
At bats Jimmy Rollins 716§ 2007 [25]
Hitting streak Jimmy Rollins 36 games[b] 2005 [26]
Slugging percentage Chuck Klein .687 1930 [9]
Extra-base hits Chuck Klein 107 1930 [9][27]
Total bases Chuck Klein 445 1930 [9]
On-base percentage Billy Hamilton .523 1894 [8]
OPS Chuck Klein 1.123 1930 [9]
Walks Lenny Dykstra 129 1993 [28]
Strikeouts Ryan Howard 199 2007 [20]
Ryan Howard3
Ryan Howard holds the franchise record of most home runs in a single season.

Single-season pitching

Statistic Player Record Season Ref
Wins Kid Gleason 38 1890 [29]
Losses John Coleman 48§ 1883 [1][30]
Strikeouts Curt Schilling 319 1997 [31]
ERA Grover Cleveland Alexander 1.22 1915 [16]
Earned runs allowed John Coleman 291§ 1883 [2][30]
Hits allowed John Coleman 772§ 1883 [3][30]
Shutouts Grover Cleveland Alexander 16§ 1916 [16][32]
Saves José Mesa 45 2002 [33]
Games Kent Tekulve 90 1987 [34]
Starts John Coleman 61 1883 [30]
Complete games John Coleman 59 1883 [30]
Innings John Coleman 583⅓ 1883 [30]
Kid Gleason
Kid Gleason holds the franchise record for most Wins in a single season

Team single-game records

All statistics in this section are drawn from the following source.[35]

Single-game batting

Statistic Record Date
Home runs hit 7 September 8, 1998, July 26, 2018
Runs scored 26 June 11, 1985
Hits 27 June 11, 1985
Doubles 11 June 23, 1976
Triples 5 August 2, 1986
Total bases 45 June 11, 1985
Runners left on base 20* September 4, 1922
Runners left on base 20* August 14, 1990
Strikeouts 19 October 6, 1991
Stolen bases 11* July 12, 1906
Stolen bases 11* August 31, 1906
MLB-Ed Delahanty
Ed Delahanty is the Phillies all time leader in triples and has the highest single season batting average with the team

Single-game pitching

Statistic Record Date
Hits allowed 30 September 2, 1935
Runs allowed 28 July 6, 1929
Home runs allowed 9 September 4, 1999
Strikeouts 17* April 23, 1961
Strikeouts 17* July 21, 1997
Robin Roberts 1961
Robin Roberts pitched in 529 games for the Phillies. The most in franchise history.

Team season records

All statistics in this section are drawn from the following source.[5]

Season batting

Statistic Record Season
Home runs 224 2009
Runs 944 1930
Hits 1,783 1930
Doubles 345 1930
Triples 82 1905
Total bases 2,594 1930
Runners left on base 1,281 1993
Strikeouts 1,155 2003
Stolen bases 200 1908
Chuck Klein 1936 Goudey
Chuck Klein holds several single season batting records with the Phillies

Season pitching

Statistic Record Season
Hits allowed 1,993 1930
Runs allowed 1,193 1930
Home runs allowed Red Sox 2004
Strikeouts 1,209 1997
shutouts 26 1916
Jonathan Papelbon on June 17, 2012
Jonathan Papelbon is the Phillies all time leader in saves.

Notes

  • a Earned run average is calculated as 9 × (ER ÷ IP), where is earned runs and is innings pitched.
  • b Jimmy Rollins hit in 36 straight games up to and including the final game of 2005. Hitting streak in one season and hitting streak over two seasons are considered two separate records by Major League Baseball. After tallying hits in the first two games of 2006, Rollins' streak officially ended at 38 over two seasons.

See also

References

General reference

"Philadelphia Phillies Team History". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-19.

Inline citations
  1. ^ a b "Single Season Leaders & Records for Losses". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  2. ^ a b "Single Season Leaders & Records for Earned Runs". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  3. ^ a b "Single Season Leaders & Records for Hits Allowed". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  4. ^ "Single Season Leaders & Records for Strikeouts". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  5. ^ a b "Phillies Season Records". Philadelphia Phillies. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  6. ^ a b "Philadelphia Phillies Batting Leaders". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  7. ^ a b "Philadelphia Phillies Pitching Leaders". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  8. ^ a b c d e f "Billy Hamilton Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h "Chuck Klein Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  10. ^ a b c d e f "Mike Schmidt Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  11. ^ a b "Richie Ashburn Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  12. ^ "Jimmy Rollins Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2013-09-29.
  13. ^ a b "Ed Delahanty Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2013-09-09.
  14. ^ a b c d e "Steve Carlton Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  15. ^ a b c d e "Robin Roberts Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  16. ^ a b c d "Pete Alexander Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  17. ^ "George McQuillan Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  18. ^ "Jonathan Papelbon Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2015-07-19.
  19. ^ "Bill Duggleby Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  20. ^ a b "Ryan Howard Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  21. ^ "Single Season Leaders & Records for RBI". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  22. ^ "Single-Season Leaders & Records for Runs". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-11-13.
  23. ^ a b "Lefty O'Doul Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  24. ^ "Sam Thompson Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  25. ^ "Phillies SS Rollins sets record for most at-bats". CBC.ca. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 2008-09-28. Retrieved 2008-12-01.
  26. ^ Mandel, Ken (2006-04-06). "Rollins' hitting streak over at 38". Philadelphia Phillies. Archived from the original on 2008-05-18. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  27. ^ "Single-Season Leaders & Records for Extra-Base Hits". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  28. ^ "Lenny Dykstra Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  29. ^ "Kid Gleason Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  30. ^ a b c d e f "John Coleman Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  31. ^ "Curt Schilling Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  32. ^ "Single-Season Leaders & Records for Shutouts". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-11-13.
  33. ^ "José Mesa Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  34. ^ "Kent Tekulve Statistics". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2008-08-18.
  35. ^ "Phillies Single Game Records". Philadelphia Phillies. Retrieved 2008-08-18.

External links

Billy Hamilton (baseball, born 1866)

William Robert "Sliding Billy" Hamilton (February 16, 1866 – December 15, 1940) was an American professional baseball player in Major League Baseball (MLB) during the 19th-century. He was notable for his offensive skills as a hitter and as a base stealer. He played for the Kansas City Cowboys, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Beaneaters between 1888 and 1901. Hamilton was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1961. As of early 2019, he is third on the all-time list of career stolen bases leaders.

History of the Philadelphia Phillies

The history of the Philadelphia Phillies of Major League Baseball's National League is a long and varied one. The Phillies are based in Philadelphia, and are a member of the National League East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park in the South Philadelphia section of the city. The franchise has won two World Series championships (against Kansas City in 1980, Tampa Bay in 2008), and seven National League pennants.

After replacing the Worcesters in 1883, the franchise made its first post-season appearance in 1915, losing to the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. The Phillies franchise also has the second-longest streak of consecutive losing seasons in American professional sports, sixteen straight from 1933 to 1948; the record stood until 2009, when it was broken by the Pittsburgh Pirates. After another National League pennant in 1950, the Phillies did not return to the post-season until 1976, beginning a period of extended success for the franchise. Compared to the team's early days, the Phillies have recently been more successful than not, with two such periods: the first from 1975 to 1983, when they won five East Division championships as well as the first-half championship in the strike-shortened 1981 season, and the second starting in 2001, with a winning percentage of .534 in those eight seasons, finishing above .500 in all but one, and making the playoffs from 2007 through 2011.

In its 127-season history, the franchise has employed 51 managers and 10 general managers (GMs). Dallas Green and Charlie Manuel are the only Phillies managers to win a World Series: Green in 1980, and Manuel in 2008. Manuel is also the only Phillies manager to win two pennants, and on the last day of the 2011 regular season, surpassed Gene Mauch's 644-win record as the winningest manager in franchise history, taking two fewer seasons than Mauch to accomplish that feat. The longest-tenured general manager is Paul Owens, with 11 years of service to the team as the general manager, from 1972 to 1983. Owens also served as the team manager in 1972, and from 1983 to 1984. After this time, he served as a team executive until 2003, and was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame in recognition of his services. The manager with the highest winning percentage over a full season or more was Arthur Irwin, whose .575 winning percentage is fourth on the all-time wins list for Phillies managers.

Richie Ashburn

Donald Richard Ashburn (March 19, 1927 – September 9, 1997), also known by the nicknames, "Putt-Putt", "The Tilden Flash", and "Whitey" (due to his light-blond hair), was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball. (Some sources give his full middle name as "Richie".) He was born in Tilden, Nebraska. From his youth on a farm, he grew up to become a professional outfielder and veteran broadcaster for the Philadelphia Phillies and one of the most beloved sports figures in Philadelphia history. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995.

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