List of Philadelphia Phillies managers

In its 133-year history, the Philadelphia Phillies baseball franchise of Major League Baseball's National League has employed 54 managers.[1] The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field.[2] Of those 52 managers, 15 have been "player-managers";[1] specifically, they managed the team while still being signed as a player.[3]

The Phillies posted their franchise record for losses in a season during their record-setting streak of 16 consecutive losing seasons (a season where the winning percentage is below .500), with 111 losses out of 154 games in 1941.[4] During this stretch from 1933 to 1948, the Phillies employed seven managers, all of whom posted a winning percentage below .430 for their Phillies careers.[1] Seven managers have taken the Phillies to the postseason, with Danny Ozark and Charlie Manuel leading the team to three playoff appearances. Dallas Green and Charlie Manuel are the only Phillies managers to win a World Series: Green in the 1980 World Series against the Kansas City Royals; and Manuel in the 2008 World Series against the Tampa Bay Rays.[5] Gene Mauch is the longest-tenured manager in franchise history, with 1,332 games of service in parts of nine seasons (1960–1968).[6] Manuel surpassed Mauch for the most victories as a manager in franchise history on September 28, 2011, with a 13-inning defeat of the Atlanta Braves; it was the team's final victory in their franchise-record 102-win season.

The manager with the highest winning percentage over a full season or more was Arthur Irwin, whose .575 winning percentage is fourth on the all-time wins list for Phillies managers.[1] Conversely, the worst winning percentage over a season in franchise history is .160 by the inaugural season's second manager Blondie Purcell, who posted a 13–68 record during the 1883 season.[7]

Table key

WPct
Winning percentage: number of wins divided by number of games managed
PA
Playoff appearances: number of years this manager has led the franchise to the playoffs
PW
Playoff wins: number of wins this manager has accrued in the playoffs
PL
Playoff losses: number of losses this manager has accrued in the playoffs
WS
World Series: number of World Series victories achieved by the manager
or
Elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame (‡ denotes induction as manager)[8]
§
Member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame

Managers

#[a] Manager Years Wins Losses Ties WPct PA PW PL WS Ref
1 Bob Ferguson 1883 4 13 0 .235 [9]
2 Blondie Purcell 1883 13 68 1 .160 [7]
3 Harry Wright 18841890 409 374 0 .522 [10]
4 Jack Clements 1890 13 6 0 .684 [11]
5 Al Reach 1890 4 7 0 .364 [12]
6 Bob Allen 1890 25 10 0 .714 [13]
Harry Wright 18911893 227 192 0 .542 [10]
7 Arthur Irwin 18941895 149 110 0 .575 [14]
8 Billy Nash 1896 62 68 0 .477 [15]
9 George Stallings 18971898 74 104 0 .416 [16]
10 Bill Shettsline 18981902 367 303 0 .548 [17]
11 Chief Zimmer 1903 49 86 0 .363 [18]
12 Hugh Duffy 19041906 206 251 0 .451 [19]
13 Billy Murray 19071909 240 214 0 .529 [20]
14 Red Dooin 19101914 392 370 0 .514 [21]
15 Pat Moran 19151918 323 257 0 .557 1 1 4 0 [22][23]
16 Jack Coombs§ 1919 18 44 0 .290 [24]
17 Gavvy Cravath§ 19191920 91 137 0 .399 [25]
18 Bill Donovan 1921 25 62 0 .287 [26]
19 Kaiser Wilhelm 19211922 83 137 0 .377 [27]
20 Art Fletcher 19231926 231 378 0 .379 [28]
21 Stuffy McInnis 1927 51 103 0 .331 [29]
22 Burt Shotton 19281933 370 549 0 .403 [30]
23 Jimmie Wilson 19341938 280 477 0 .370 [31]
24 Hans Lobert 1938 0 2 0 .000 [32]
25 Doc Prothro 19391941 138 320 0 .301 [33]
Hans Lobert 1942 42 109 0 .278 [32]
26 Bucky Harris 1943 38 52 0 .422 [34]
27 Freddie Fitzsimmons 19431945 105 181 0 .367 [35]
28 Ben Chapman 19451948 196 276 0 .415 [36]
29 Dusty Cooke 1948 6 6 0 .500 [37]
30 Eddie Sawyer 19481952 296 292 0 .504 1 0 4 0 [38][39]
31 Steve O'Neill 19521954 182 140 0 .565 [40]
32 Terry Moore 1954 35 42 0 .455 [41]
33 Mayo Smith 19551958 264 282 0 .484 [42]
Eddie Sawyer 19581960 94 131 0 .418 [38]
34 Andy Cohen 1960 1 0 0 1.000 [43]
35 Gene Mauch 19601968 646 684 0 .486 [6]
36 Bob Skinner 19681969 92 123 0 .428 [44]
37 George Myatt 1969 20 35 0 .364 [45]
38 Frank Lucchesi 19701972 166 233 0 .416 [46]
39 Paul Owens§ 1972 33 47 0 .413 [47]
40 Danny Ozark 19731979 594 510 0 .538 3 2 9 0 [48][49]
[50][51]
41 Dallas Green§ 19791981 169 130 0 .565 2 9 7 1 [52][53]
[54]
42 Pat Corrales 19821983 132 115 0 .534 [55]
Paul Owens§ 19831984 128 111 0 .536 1 4 5 0 [47][56]
43 John Felske 19851987 190 194 0 .495 [57]
44 Lee Elia 19871988 111 142 0 .439 [58]
45 John Vukovich§ 1988 5 4 0 .555 [59]
46 Nick Leyva 19891991 148 189 0 .439 [60]
47 Jim Fregosi 19911996 431 463 0 .482 1 6 6 0 [61][62]
48 Terry Francona 19972000 285 363 0 .440 [63]
49 Larry Bowa§[b] 20012004 337 308 0 .522 [64]
50 Gary Varsho 2004 1 1 0 .500 [65]
51 Charlie Manuel§ 20052013 780 636 0 .551 5 27 18 1 [66][67]
[68][69]
52 Ryne Sandberg 20132015 119 159 0 .428 [70]
53 Pete Mackanin 20152017 174 238 0 .422
54 Gabe Kapler 2018–present 119 119 0 .500

Statistics current through July 7, 2018

Bob-Allen-Pittsburgh-Shortstop-1889

Bob Allen, manager, 1890

Hugh Duffy Baseball

Hugh Duffy, manager, 1904–1906

Kaiser Wilhelm

Kaiser Wilhelm, manager, 1921–1922

Dallas Green 2009

Dallas Green became the Phillies manager in 1979 to 1981, And get the 1980 World Series champion

Charlie Manuel

Charlie Manuel, manager, 2005–2013, And get the 2008 World Series champion

Ryne Sandberg

Ryne Sandberg managed the Phillies from 2013–2015

Pete Mackanin on July 16, 2016 (cropped)

Pete Mackanin became the Phillies manager in 2015 to 2017.

001H0892 Gabe Kapler

Gabe Kapler is the current manager of the Phillies.

Footnotes

See also

References

General references
  1. "Philadelphia Phillies Managerial Register". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 23, 2008.
  2. "Phillies All-Time Managers". Philadelphia Phillies. Retrieved August 12, 2008.
Inline citations
  1. ^ a b c d "Philadelphia Phillies Managerial Register". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 23, 2008.
  2. ^ "Manager: Definition | Dictionary.com". Dictionary.Reference.com. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. 2006. Retrieved December 29, 2008.
  3. ^ Stein, Fred (2002). And the Skipper Bats Cleanup: A History of the Baseball Player-Manager, with 42 Biographies of Men Who Filled the Dual Role. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland. ISBN 0-7864-1228-3.
  4. ^ "1941 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 11, 2008.
  5. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies Team History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  6. ^ a b "Gene Mauch Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  7. ^ a b "Blondie Purcell Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 23, 2008.
  8. ^ "Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2008.
  9. ^ "Bob Ferguson Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  10. ^ a b "Harry Wright Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  11. ^ "Jack Clements Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  12. ^ "Al Reach Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  13. ^ "Bob Allen Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  14. ^ "Arthur Irwin Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  15. ^ "Billy Nash Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  16. ^ "George Stallings Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  17. ^ "Bill Shettsline Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  18. ^ "Chief Zimmer Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  19. ^ "Hugh Duffy Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  20. ^ "Billy Murray Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  21. ^ "Red Dooin Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  22. ^ "Pat Moran Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  23. ^ "1915 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  24. ^ "Jack Coombs Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  25. ^ "Gavvy Cravath Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  26. ^ "Bill Donovan Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  27. ^ "Kaiser Wilhelm Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  28. ^ "Art Fletcher Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  29. ^ "Stuffy McInnis Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  30. ^ "Burt Shotton Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  31. ^ "Jimmie Wilson Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  32. ^ a b "Hans Lobert Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  33. ^ "Doc Prothro Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  34. ^ "Bucky Harris Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  35. ^ "Freddie Fitzsimmons Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  36. ^ "Ben Chapman Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  37. ^ "Dusty Cooke Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  38. ^ a b "Eddie Sawyer Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  39. ^ "1950 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  40. ^ "Steve O'Neill Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  41. ^ "Terry Moore Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  42. ^ "Mayo Smith Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  43. ^ "Andy Cohen Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  44. ^ "Bob Skinner Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  45. ^ "George Myatt Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  46. ^ "Frank Lucchesi Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  47. ^ a b "Paul Owens Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  48. ^ "Danny Ozark Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  49. ^ "1976 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  50. ^ "1977 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  51. ^ "1978 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  52. ^ "Dallas Green Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  53. ^ "1980 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  54. ^ "1981 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  55. ^ "Pat Corrales Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  56. ^ "1983 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  57. ^ "John Felske Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  58. ^ "Lee Elia Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  59. ^ "John Vukovich Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  60. ^ "Nick Leyva Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  61. ^ "Jim Fregosi Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  62. ^ "1993 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  63. ^ "Terry Francona". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  64. ^ "Larry Bowa Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  65. ^ "Gary Varsho Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  66. ^ "Charlie Manuel Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  67. ^ "2007 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  68. ^ "2008 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 16, 2009.
  69. ^ "2009 Philadelphia Phillies". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 16, 2009.
  70. ^ "Ryne Sanberg Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  71. ^ "MLB Awards (Manager of the Year)". Major League Baseball. Retrieved July 28, 2008.

External links

History of the Philadelphia Phillies

The history of the Philadelphia Phillies of Major League Baseball's National League is a long and varied one. The Phillies are based in Philadelphia, and are a member of the National League East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park in the South Philadelphia section of the city. The franchise has won two World Series championships (against Kansas City in 1980, Tampa Bay in 2008), and seven National League pennants.

After replacing the Worcesters in 1883, the franchise made its first post-season appearance in 1915, losing to the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. The Phillies franchise also has the second-longest streak of consecutive losing seasons in American professional sports, sixteen straight from 1933 to 1948; the record stood until 2009, when it was broken by the Pittsburgh Pirates. After another National League pennant in 1950, the Phillies did not return to the post-season until 1976, beginning a period of extended success for the franchise. Compared to the team's early days, the Phillies have recently been more successful than not, with two such periods: the first from 1975 to 1983, when they won five East Division championships as well as the first-half championship in the strike-shortened 1981 season, and the second starting in 2001, with a winning percentage of .534 in those eight seasons, finishing above .500 in all but one, and making the playoffs from 2007 through 2011.

In its 127-season history, the franchise has employed 51 managers and 10 general managers (GMs). Dallas Green and Charlie Manuel are the only Phillies managers to win a World Series: Green in 1980, and Manuel in 2008. Manuel is also the only Phillies manager to win two pennants, and on the last day of the 2011 regular season, surpassed Gene Mauch's 644-win record as the winningest manager in franchise history, taking two fewer seasons than Mauch to accomplish that feat. The longest-tenured general manager is Paul Owens, with 11 years of service to the team as the general manager, from 1972 to 1983. Owens also served as the team manager in 1972, and from 1983 to 1984. After this time, he served as a team executive until 2003, and was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame in recognition of his services. The manager with the highest winning percentage over a full season or more was Arthur Irwin, whose .575 winning percentage is fourth on the all-time wins list for Phillies managers.

List of Philadelphia Phillies Opening Day starting pitchers

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Philadelphia. They play in the National League East division. Also known in early franchise history as the "Philadelphia Quakers", the Phillies have used 72 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 128 seasons. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. Where decisions are known, the 72 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 33 wins, 40 losses and 20 no decisions (33–40–20); where decisions are unknown, the team's record was 17–19. No decisions are awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game. It can also result if a starting pitcher does not pitch five full innings, even if his team retains the lead and wins.Hall of Fame left-handed pitcher Steve Carlton has the most Opening Day starts for the Phillies, with 14, compiling a record of 3–9–2. He is followed by Robin Roberts (twelve starts; 5–6–1), Chris Short (six starts; 3–1–2), and Curt Schilling (five starts; 2–0–3). Grover Cleveland Alexander also made five Opening Day starts for the Phillies, equal to Schilling; however, no information on his decisions in those games is available. The team's record in his five Opening Day starts is 4–1.

Roberts holds the Phillies' record for most wins in Opening Day starts with five. Art Mahaffey has the best record in Opening Day starts for the franchise; though many players have won their only Opening Day start, Mahaffey started and won two Opening Day games, for a winning percentage of 1.000; Roy Halladay also has a 1.000 winning percentage, with two wins and a no decision in three starts. Conversely, George McQuillan is the only player to have a .000 winning percentage in more than one Opening Day start (0–2–0 in two starts). Brett Myers has a .000 winning percentage in his three starts, but has accumulated two no decisions (0–1–2). Carlton has the most Opening Day losses for the team, with nine.

The Phillies have played in six home ballparks. Their best overall Opening Day record is at Shibe Park (also known as Connie Mack Stadium), where they won 11 Opening Day games out of 14 played there (11–3). The team also owned an 8–17 Opening Day record at Baker Bowl (initially known as the Philadelphia Baseball Grounds), with 1 tie. Recreation Park's Opening Day record is 1–2, while Veterans Stadium has the lowest winning percentage (.200), with 2 wins and 8 losses. The Phillies currently play at Citizens Bank Park, where they are 1–5 on Opening Day.

The Phillies have played in seven World Series championships in their history, winning in 1980 and 2008. Carlton won his Opening Day start against the Montreal Expos in 1980, while Myers received a no-decision against the same franchise (now the Washington Nationals) in 2008, a game that the Phillies eventually lost, and lost the opening game against the Atlanta Braves in 2009. Carlton also started Opening Day in 1983, the year that the Phillies lost to the Baltimore Orioles in the World Series. Alexander started Opening Day in 1915, the Phillies' first World Series appearance, while Roberts started the first game of 1950, and Terry Mulholland the first game of 1993.

List of Philadelphia Phillies owners and executives

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Phillies compete in MLB as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. In the franchise's history, the owners and ownership syndicates of the team have employed 11 general managers (GMs) and appointed 15 team presidents. The GM controls player transactions, hiring and firing of the coaching staff, and negotiates with players and agents regarding contracts. The team president is the representative for the owner or the ownership group within the front office and is responsible for overseeing the team's staff, minor league farm system, and scouting.The longest-tenured general manager is Paul Owens, with 11 years of service to the team in that role, from 1972 to 1983. Owens also served as the team manager in 1972, and from 1983 to 1984. After this time, he served as a team executive until 2003, and was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame in recognition of his services. The longest-tenured owner is Bob Carpenter, Jr., who was the team's primary shareholder from 1943 to 1972. He appointed the team's first general manager, Herb Pennock, during his tenure. In combination with his son, Ruly, the Carpenter family owned the Phillies for nearly 50 years (until 1981) until it was sold to Bill Giles, son of former league president Warren Giles. After Giles sold his part-ownership share, the Phillies are currently owned by John S. Middleton, Jim & Pete Buck, and former team President David Montgomery. The Phillies are currently overseen by team president Andy MacPhail and GM Matt Klentak.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

Terry Moore (baseball)

Terry Bluford Moore (May 27, 1912 – March 29, 1995) was an American professional baseball center fielder, manager, and coach. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1935–1942, 1946–1948), and later coached for them (1949–1952, 1956–1958). Moore managed the 1954 Philadelphia Phillies, taking the reins from Steve O’Neill, for the second half of the season.

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