List of NBA on NBC broadcasters

2001–02

  1. Marv Albert/Bill Walton/Steve Jones/Jim Gray
  2. Mike Breen or Tom Hammond/P.J. Carlesimo/Lewis Johnson
  3. Tom Hammond or Mike Breen/Mike Dunleavy/Andrea Joyce

2000–01

  1. Marv Albert/Doug Collins/Jim Gray
  2. Tom Hammond or Mike Breen/Bill Walton/Steve Jones/Lewis Johnson
  3. Mike Breen/Matt Guokas/Andrea Joyce
  • This season marked the return of Marv Albert to NBC coverage.

1999–00

  1. Bob Costas/Doug Collins/Ahmad Rashad
  2. Tom Hammond/Bill Walton/Steve Jones/Jim Gray
  3. Mike Breen/Matt Guokas

1998–99

  1. Bob Costas/Doug Collins/Ahmad Rashad
  2. Tom Hammond/Bill Walton/Steve Jones/Jim Gray
  3. Mike Breen/Matt Guokas

1997–98

  1. Bob Costas/Doug Collins/Isiah Thomas/Ahmad Rashad
  2. Tom Hammond or Greg Gumbel (Gumbel left NBC after Super Bowl XXXII to return to CBS)/Bill Walton/Steve Jones/Jim Gray
  3. Mike Breen or Tom Hammond/Matt Guokas
  • Shortly before the 1997–98 NBA season began, Marv Albert was fired following being charged with sexual assault.

1996–97

  1. Marv Albert/Matt Guokas/Ahmad Rashad
  2. Greg Gumbel/Bill Walton/Steve Jones/Jim Gray
  3. Tom Hammond/Dan Issel

1995–96

  1. Marv Albert/Matt Guokas/Ahmad Rashad
  2. Greg Gumbel/Bill Walton/Steve Jones/Hannah Storm
  3. Tom Hammond/Dan Issel

1994–95

  1. Marv Albert/Matt Guokas
  2. Greg Gumbel/Bill Walton/Steve Jones
  3. Tom Hammond/Ron Rothstein

1993–94

  1. Marv Albert/Matt Guokas
  2. Dick Enberg/Bill Walton/Steve Jones
  3. Tom Hammond/Ron Rothstein

1992–93

  1. Marv Albert/Mike Fratello
  2. Dick Enberg or Tom Hammond/Steve Jones/Magic Johnson

1991–92

  1. Marv Albert/Mike Fratello
  2. Dick Enberg/Steve Jones/Magic Johnson

1990–91

  1. Marv Albert/Mike Fratello
  2. Dick Enberg/Steve Jones
  3. Bob Costas/Pat Riley

Sources

NBA on television in the 1950s

The League signed a contract with DuMont in its 8th season (1953–54), marking the first year the NBA had a national television broadcaster. Similar to NFL, the lack of television stations led to NBC taking over the rights beginning the very next season until April 7, 1962 - NBC's first tenure with the NBA.

NBA on television in the 1960s

As one of the major sports leagues in North America, the National Basketball Association has a long history of partnership with television networks in the US. The League signed a contract with DuMont in its 8th season (1953–54), marking the first year the NBA had a national television broadcaster. Similar to NFL, the lack of television stations led to NBC taking over the rights beginning the very next season until April 7, 1962 - NBC's first tenure with the NBA. After the deal expired, Sports Network Incorporated (later known as the Hughes Television Network) signed up for two-year coverage in the 1962–63, 1963–64 season. ABC gained the NBA in 1964, the network aired its first NBA game on January 3, 1965, but lost the broadcast rights to CBS after the 1972–73 season with the initial tenure ending on May 10, 1973.

NBA on television in the 1990s

As the national broadcaster of the NBA, CBS aired NBA games from the 1973-74 until the 1989–90 season, during which the early 1980s is notoriously known as the tape delay playoff era.

NBC then succeeded the broadcast rights from 1990 to 2002. During NBC's partnership with the NBA in the 1990s, the league rose to unprecedented popularity, with ratings surpassing the days of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird in the mid 1980s. Upon expiration of the contract in 2002, the league signed an agreement with ABC, which began airing games in the 2002-03 season. NBC had made a four-year $1.3 billion ($330 million/year) bid in the spring of 2002 to renew its NBA rights, but the league instead went to ESPN and ABC with a six-year deal worth $2.4 billion ($400 million/year), a total of $4.6 billion ($766 million/year) when adding the cable deal with Turner Sports.

NBA on television in the 2000s

As the national broadcaster of the NBA, CBS aired NBA games from the 1973-74 until the 1989–90 season, during which the early 1980s is notoriously known as the tape delay playoff era.

NBC then succeeded the broadcast rights from 1990 to 2002. During NBC's partnership with the NBA in the 1990s, the league rose to unprecedented popularity, with ratings surpassing the days of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird in the mid 1980s. Upon expiration of the contract in 2002, the league signed an agreement with ABC, which began airing games in the 2002-03 season. NBC had made a four-year $1.3 billion ($330 million/year) bid in the spring of 2002 to renew its NBA rights, but the league instead went to ESPN and ABC with a six-year deal worth $2.4 billion ($400 million/year), a total of $4.6 billion ($766 million/year) when adding the cable deal with Turner Sports. Partially due to the retirement of Michael Jordan, the league suffered ratings decline after ESPN and ABC took over the rights. The NBA extended its national TV package on June 27, 2007 worth eight-year $7.4 billion ($930 million/year) through the 2015–16 season, during which the league had its new resurgence leading by renewed Celtics–Lakers rivalry and LeBron James.

The 2001-02 season would mark the final year of regular NBA coverage on TBS, Turner Sports signed a new NBA television contract in which TNT would assume rights to the company's NBA package while TBS would discontinue game coverage altogether.

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