List of NBA champions

The National Basketball Association (NBA) Finals is the championship series for the NBA and the conclusion of its postseason. All Finals have been played in a best-of-seven format, and are contested between the winners of the Eastern Conference and the Western Conference (formerly Divisions before 1970), except in 1950 when the Eastern Division champion faced the winner between the Western and Central Division champions. From 1946 through 1949, when the league was known as the Basketball Association of America (BAA), the playoffs were a three-stage tournament where the two semifinal winners played each other in the finals.[1][2][3] The winning team of the series receives the Larry O'Brien Championship Trophy.

The current home-and-away format in the NBA Finals is 2–2–1–1–1 (the team with the better regular-season record plays on their home court in Games 1, 2, 5, and 7), which has been used in 19471948, 19501952, 19571970, 19721974, 19761977, 19791984, and 2014–present. It was previously in a 2–3–2 format (the team with the better regular season record plays on their home court in Games 1, 2, 6, and 7) during 1949, 19531955, and 19852013,[4][5][6][7][8][9] in a 1–1–1–1–1–1–1 format during 1956 and 1971,[10][11] and in a 1–2–2–1–1 format during 1975 and 1978.[12][13]

The Eastern Conference/Division leads the Western Conference/Division in series won (39–34). The defunct Central Division, in existence during the 1949–50 NBA season when the NBA was divided into three divisions and different from the current Central Division created in 1970 when the then existing Eastern Division was upgraded as a conference, won one championship. The Boston Celtics and the Minneapolis/Los Angeles Lakers alone own almost half of the titles, having won a combined 33 of 73 championships. As of 2019, the defending champions are the Toronto Raptors.

Champions

  • The first brackets in the Western champion and Eastern champion columns indicate the teams' playoff seed. The second brackets indicate the number of times that teams have appeared in an NBA Finals as well as each respective team's NBA Finals record to date.
Bold Winning team of the NBA Finals
Italics Team with home-court advantage
Year Western champion Coach Result Eastern champion Coach Reference
1947 Chicago Stags (1) (1, 0–1) Harold Olsen 1–4 Philadelphia Warriors (2) (1, 1–0) Eddie Gottlieb [14]
1948 Baltimore Bullets (2) (1, 1–0) Buddy Jeannette 4–2 Philadelphia Warriors (1) (2, 1–1) Eddie Gottlieb [15]
1949 Minneapolis Lakers (2) (1, 1–0) John Kundla 4–2 Washington Capitols (1) (1, 0–1) Red Auerbach [16]
1950 Minneapolis Lakers (1) [a] (2, 2–0) John Kundla 4–2 Syracuse Nationals (1) (1, 0–1) Al Cervi [20][21]
1951 Rochester Royals (2) (1, 1–0) Les Harrison 4–3 New York Knicks (3) (1, 0–1) Joe Lapchick [22]
1952 Minneapolis Lakers (2) (3, 3–0) John Kundla 4–3 New York Knicks (3) (2, 0–2) Joe Lapchick [23]
1953 Minneapolis Lakers (1) (4, 4–0) John Kundla 4–1 New York Knicks (1) (3, 0–3) Joe Lapchick [24]
1954 Minneapolis Lakers (1) (5, 5–0) John Kundla 4–3 Syracuse Nationals (1) (3, 0–2) Al Cervi [25]
1955 Fort Wayne Pistons (1) (1, 0–1) Charles Eckman 3–4 Syracuse Nationals (1) (3, 1–2) Al Cervi [26]
1956 Fort Wayne Pistons (1) (2, 0–2) Charles Eckman 1–4 Philadelphia Warriors (1) (3, 2–1) George Senesky [27]
1957 St. Louis Hawks (1) (1, 0–1) Alex Hannum 3–4 Boston Celtics (1) (1, 1–0) Red Auerbach [28]
1958 St. Louis Hawks (1) (2, 1–1) Alex Hannum 4–2 Boston Celtics (1) (2, 1–1) Red Auerbach [29]
1959 Minneapolis Lakers (2) (6, 5–1) John Kundla 0–4 Boston Celtics (1) (3, 2–1) Red Auerbach [30]
1960 St. Louis Hawks (1) (3, 1–2) Ed Macauley 3–4 Boston Celtics (1) (4, 3–1) Red Auerbach [31]
1961 St. Louis Hawks (1) (4, 1–3) Paul Seymour 1–4 Boston Celtics (1) (5, 4–1) Red Auerbach [32]
1962 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (7, 5–2) Fred Schaus 3–4 Boston Celtics (1) (6, 5–1) Red Auerbach [33]
1963 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (8, 5–3) Fred Schaus 2–4 Boston Celtics (1) (7, 6–1) Red Auerbach [34]
1964[b] San Francisco Warriors (1) (4, 2–2) Alex Hannum 1–4 Boston Celtics (1) (8, 7–1) Red Auerbach [35]
1965 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (9, 5–4) Fred Schaus 1–4 Boston Celtics (1) (9, 8–1) Red Auerbach [36]
1966 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (10, 5–5) Fred Schaus 3–4 Boston Celtics (2) (10, 9–1) Red Auerbach [37]
1967 San Francisco Warriors (1) (5, 2–3) Bill Sharman 2–4 Philadelphia 76ers (1) (4, 2–2) Alex Hannum [38]
1968 Los Angeles Lakers (2) (11, 5–6) Butch van Breda Kolff 2–4 Boston Celtics (2) (11, 10–1) Bill Russell [39]
1969 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (12, 5–7) Butch van Breda Kolff 3–4 Boston Celtics (4) (12, 11–1) Bill Russell [40]
1970 Los Angeles Lakers (2) (13, 5–8) Joe Mullaney 3–4 New York Knicks (1) (4, 1–3) Red Holzman [41]
1971 Milwaukee Bucks (1) (1, 1–0) Larry Costello 4–0 Baltimore Bullets (1) (1, 0–1) Gene Shue [42]
1972 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (14, 6–8) Bill Sharman 4–1 New York Knicks (2) (5, 1–4) Red Holzman [43]
1973 Los Angeles Lakers (2) (15, 6–9) Bill Sharman 1–4 New York Knicks (2) (6, 2–4) Red Holzman [44]
1974 Milwaukee Bucks (1) (2, 1–1) Larry Costello 3–4 Boston Celtics (1) (13, 12–1) Tom Heinsohn [45]
1975 Golden State Warriors (1) (6, 3–3) Al Attles 4–0 Washington Bullets (2) (2, 0–2) K. C. Jones [46]
1976 Phoenix Suns (3) (1, 0–1) John MacLeod 2–4 Boston Celtics (1) (14, 13–1) Tom Heinsohn [47]
1977[c] Portland Trail Blazers (3) (1, 1–0) Jack Ramsey 4–2 Philadelphia 76ers (1) (5, 2–3) Gene Shue [50]
1978 Seattle SuperSonics (4) (1, 0–1) Lenny Wilkens 3–4 Washington Bullets (3) (3, 1–2) Dick Motta [51]
1979 Seattle SuperSonics (1) (2, 1–1) Lenny Wilkens 4–1 Washington Bullets (1) (4, 1–3) Dick Motta [52]
1980 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (16, 7–9) Paul Westhead 4–2 Philadelphia 76ers (3) (6, 2–4) Billy Cunningham [53]
1981 Houston Rockets (6) (1, 0–1) Del Harris 2–4 Boston Celtics (1) (15, 14–1) Bill Fitch [54]
1982 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (17, 8–9) Pat Riley 4–2 Philadelphia 76ers (3) (7, 2–5) Billy Cunningham [55]
1983 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (18, 8–10) Pat Riley 0–4 Philadelphia 76ers (1) (8, 3–5) Billy Cunningham [56]
1984[d] Los Angeles Lakers (1) (19, 8–11) Pat Riley 3–4 Boston Celtics (1) (16, 15–1) K. C. Jones [57]
1985 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (20, 9–11) Pat Riley 4–2 Boston Celtics (1) (17, 15–2) K. C. Jones [58]
1986 Houston Rockets (2) (2, 0–2) Bill Fitch 2–4 Boston Celtics (1) (18, 16–2) K. C. Jones [59]
1987 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (21, 10–11) Pat Riley 4–2 Boston Celtics (1) (19, 16–3) K. C. Jones [60]
1988 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (22, 11–11) Pat Riley 4–3 Detroit Pistons (2) (3, 0–3) Chuck Daly [61]
1989 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (23, 11–12) Pat Riley 0–4 Detroit Pistons (1) (4, 1–3) Chuck Daly [62]
1990 Portland Trail Blazers (3) (2, 1–1) Rick Adelman 1–4 Detroit Pistons (1) (5, 2–3) Chuck Daly [63]
1991 Los Angeles Lakers (3) (24, 11–13) Mike Dunleavy 1–4 Chicago Bulls (1) (1, 1–0) Phil Jackson [64]
1992 Portland Trail Blazers (1) (3, 1–2) Rick Adelman 2–4 Chicago Bulls (1) (2, 2–0) Phil Jackson [65]
1993 Phoenix Suns (1) (2, 0–2) Paul Westphal 2–4 Chicago Bulls (2) (3, 3–0) Phil Jackson [66]
1994 Houston Rockets (2) (3, 1–2) Rudy Tomjanovich 4–3 New York Knicks (2) (7, 2–5) Pat Riley [67]
1995 Houston Rockets (6) (4, 2–2) Rudy Tomjanovich 4–0 Orlando Magic (1) (1, 0–1) Brian Hill [68]
1996 Seattle SuperSonics (1) (3, 1–2) George Karl 2–4 Chicago Bulls (1) (4, 4–0) Phil Jackson [69]
1997 Utah Jazz (1) (1, 0–1) Jerry Sloan 2–4 Chicago Bulls (1) (5, 5–0) Phil Jackson [70]
1998 Utah Jazz (1) (2, 0–2) Jerry Sloan 2–4 Chicago Bulls (1) (6, 6–0) Phil Jackson [71]
1999[e] San Antonio Spurs (1) (1, 1–0) Gregg Popovich 4–1 New York Knicks (8) (8, 2–6) Jeff Van Gundy [73]
2000 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (25, 12–13) Phil Jackson 4–2 Indiana Pacers (1) (1, 0–1) Larry Bird [74]
2001 Los Angeles Lakers (2) (26, 13–13) Phil Jackson 4–1 Philadelphia 76ers (1) (9, 3–6) Larry Brown [75]
2002 Los Angeles Lakers (3) (27, 14–13) Phil Jackson 4–0 New Jersey Nets (1) (1, 0–1) Byron Scott [76]
2003 San Antonio Spurs (1) (2, 2–0) Gregg Popovich 4–2 New Jersey Nets (2) (2, 0–2) Byron Scott [77]
2004 Los Angeles Lakers (2) (28, 14–14) Phil Jackson 1–4 Detroit Pistons (3) (6, 3–3) Larry Brown [78]
2005 San Antonio Spurs (2) (3, 3–0) Gregg Popovich 4–3 Detroit Pistons (2) (7, 3–4) Larry Brown [79]
2006 Dallas Mavericks (4) (1, 0–1) Avery Johnson 2–4 Miami Heat (2) (1, 1–0) Pat Riley [80]
2007 San Antonio Spurs (3) (4, 4–0) Gregg Popovich 4–0 Cleveland Cavaliers (2) (1, 0–1) Mike Brown [81]
2008 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (29, 14–15) Phil Jackson 2–4 Boston Celtics (1) (20, 17–3) Doc Rivers [82]
2009 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (30, 15–15) Phil Jackson 4–1 Orlando Magic (3) (2, 0–2) Stan Van Gundy [83]
2010 Los Angeles Lakers (1) (31, 16–15) Phil Jackson 4–3 Boston Celtics (4) (21, 17–4) Doc Rivers [84]
2011 Dallas Mavericks (3) (2, 1–1) Rick Carlisle 4–2 Miami Heat (2) (2, 1–1) Erik Spoelstra [85]
2012[f] Oklahoma City Thunder (2) (4, 1–3) Scott Brooks 1–4 Miami Heat (2) (3, 2–1) Erik Spoelstra [88]
2013 San Antonio Spurs (2) (5, 4–1) Gregg Popovich 3–4 Miami Heat (1) (4, 3–1) Erik Spoelstra [89]
2014 San Antonio Spurs (1) (6, 5–1) Gregg Popovich 4–1 Miami Heat (2) (5, 3–2) Erik Spoelstra [90]
2015 Golden State Warriors (1) (7, 4–3) Steve Kerr 4–2 Cleveland Cavaliers (2) (2, 0–2) David Blatt [91]
2016 Golden State Warriors (1) (8, 4–4) Steve Kerr 3–4 Cleveland Cavaliers (1) (3, 1–2) Tyronn Lue [92]
2017 Golden State Warriors (1) (9, 5–4) Steve Kerr 4–1 Cleveland Cavaliers (2) (4, 1–3) Tyronn Lue [93]
2018 Golden State Warriors (2) (10, 6–4) Steve Kerr 4–0 Cleveland Cavaliers (4) (5, 1–4) Tyronn Lue [94]
2019 Golden State Warriors (1) (11, 6–5) Steve Kerr 2–4 Toronto Raptors (2) (1, 1–0) Nick Nurse [95]

Results by teams

Teams Win Loss Total Year(s) won Year(s) lost
Boston Celtics 17 4 21 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1974, 1976, 1981, 1984, 1986, 2008 1958, 1985, 1987, 2010
Minneapolis/Los Angeles Lakers 16 15 31 1949, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1972, 1980, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2009, 2010 1959, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1983, 1984, 1989, 1991, 2004, 2008
Philadelphia/San Francisco/Golden State Warriors 6 5 11 1947, 1956, 1975, 2015, 2017, 2018 1948, 1964, 1967, 2016, 2019
Chicago Bulls 6 0 6 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998
San Antonio Spurs 5 1 6 1999, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2014 2013
Syracuse Nationals/Philadelphia 76ers 3 6 9 1955, 1967, 1983 1950, 1954, 1977, 1980, 1982, 2001
Fort Wayne/Detroit Pistons 3 4 7 1989, 1990, 2004 1955, 1956, 1988, 2005
Miami Heat 3 2 5 2006, 2012, 2013 2011, 2014
New York Knicks 2 6 8 1970, 1973 1951, 1952, 1953, 1972, 1994, 1999
Houston Rockets 2 2 4 1994, 1995 1981, 1986
Cleveland Cavaliers 1 4 5 2016 2007, 2015, 2017, 2018
St. Louis/Atlanta Hawks 1 3 4 1958 1957, 1960, 1961
Baltimore/Washington Bullets/Washington Wizards 1 3 4 1978 1971, 1975, 1979
Seattle SuperSonics/Oklahoma City Thunder 1 3 4 1979 1978, 1996, 2012
Portland Trail Blazers 1 2 3 1977 1990, 1992
Milwaukee Bucks 1 1 2 1971 1974
Dallas Mavericks 1 1 2 2011 2006
Baltimore Bullets (original) (folded in 1954)[g] 1 0 1 1948
Rochester/Cincinnati Royals/Kansas City/Sacramento Kings 1 0 1 1951
Toronto Raptors 1 0 1 2019
Phoenix Suns 0 2 2 1976, 1993
New Orleans/Utah Jazz 0 2 2 1997, 1998
New Jersey/Brooklyn Nets 0 2 2 2002, 2003
Orlando Magic 0 2 2 1995, 2009
Chicago Stags (folded in 1950) 0 1 1 1947
Washington Capitols (folded in 1951) 0 1 1 1949
Indiana Pacers 0 1 1 2000
Buffalo Braves/San Diego/Los Angeles Clippers
Charlotte Hornets/Bobcats
Denver Nuggets
Minnesota Timberwolves
New Orleans Hornets/Pelicans
Vancouver/Memphis Grizzlies

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Minneapolis was the Central Division (now defunct, no relation to the current Central Division) playoff champion, while the Anderson Packers were the Western Division playoff champion.[17] Due to the NBA's realignment into three divisions,[18][19] the team with the best regular season record after the Divisional Finals advanced automatically to the NBA Finals, while the other two teams faced off in the NBA Semifinals to determine the other finalist. Eastern Division playoff champion Syracuse had the best regular season record among the division playoff champions, causing Minneapolis to face Anderson in the NBA Semifinals.[17][20]
  2. ^ The trophy was renamed for Walter A. Brown.
  3. ^ The trophy was replaced by a new design.[48][49]
  4. ^ The trophy was renamed for Larry O'Brien.
  5. ^ Due to a lockout, the season did not start until February 5, 1999, and all 29 teams played a shortened 50 game regular season schedule.[72]
  6. ^ Due to a lockout, the season did not start until December 25, 2011 and all 30 teams played a shortened 66-game regular season schedule.[86][87]
  7. ^ Not affiliated with the present-day Washington Wizards who were known as the Baltimore/Capital/Washington Bullets from 1963 to 1997.

References

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  95. ^ "2019 NBA Finals Warriors vs. Raptors". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 30, 2019.

External links

List of NBA G League champions

The NBA G League (previously known as the National Basketball Development League (NBDL) from 2001 to 2005 and the National Basketball Association Development League (NBA D-League) from 2005 to 2017) Finals is the championship game or series for the NBA G League and the conclusion of the league's postseason.

Since the league's inception in 2001–02, a variety of formats has been used to determine the champion. From the inaugural postseason in 2002 through 2006, the four teams with the best records advanced to the postseason because there were no division or conference splits to divide the eight teams. The first two seasons, both semi-finals and the Finals series were in a best-of-three format, whereby a team must win two of the three games to advance or win the championship (the best-of-three would resume again in 2008 and is still used today). Then, between 2004 and 2007, the playoffs used a single-elimination tournament among the four teams, with two semi-final games and one winner-takes-all championship match.In 2007, the league had expanded to 12 teams and was divided into Eastern and Western Conferences, comprising six teams apiece. The playoffs pitted each conference's winner against one another, with the Eastern Conference's Dakota Wizards winning the championship 129–121 in overtime against the Colorado 14ers. With the league's continued expansion to 14 and 16 teams over the next two years, respectively, the two-conference format was replaced with a three-division format consisting of Western, Southwestern and Central Divisions. Both the 2008 and 2009 NBADL championship series were between teams representing the Western and Southwestern Divisions, with no Central teams ever making it to the finals. These divisions split, with the Idaho Stampede of the Western Division winning in 2008, while the Colorado 14ers of the Southwestern Division won in 2009. Since 2010, the league has re-formatted to the Eastern and Western Conferences. Due to there being two more teams in the Western Conference (9) than the Eastern Conference (7), and because the top eight teams with the best regular season records qualify for the postseason irrespective of conference, the 2010 NBADL Finals consisted of two Western Conference teams. No teams from the east had advanced beyond the first two rounds, and the NBADL champion that season was the Rio Grande Valley Vipers.

List of NBA championship head coaches

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a major professional basketball league in North America. It was founded in 1946 as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The league adopted its current name at the start of the 1949–50 season when it merged with the National Basketball League (NBL). The league consists of 30 teams, of which 29 are located in the United States and one in Canada. In the NBA, a head coach is the highest ranking coach of a coaching staff. They typically hold a more public profile and are paid more than the assistant coaches.

Former Los Angeles Lakers head coach Phil Jackson won eleven NBA championships, the most in NBA history. He won six titles with the Chicago Bulls and five titles with the Lakers, and is the only coach who has won multiple championships with more than one team. Red Auerbach won nine championships with the Boston Celtics and won eight consecutive titles from 1959 to 1966. John Kundla, Pat Riley, and current San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich have each won five championships. Kundla won all of his titles with the Lakers, and Popovich has won all of his titles with the Spurs, while Riley won four titles with the Lakers and one with the Miami Heat. Current Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr has won three championships, while current Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra has won two titles. Los Angeles Clippers head coach Doc Rivers, Dallas Mavericks head coach Rick Carlisle and Toronto Raptors head coach Nick Nurse are the only other active coaches who have won a championship, Rivers having won while with the Boston Celtics in 2008.

Of the championship head coaches, 14 (Auerbach, Larry Brown, Carlisle, Bill Fitch, Tom Heinsohn, Red Holzman, Jackson, Kerr, Dick Motta, Popovich, Riley, Rivers, Bill Sharman, and Lenny Wilkens) have won the Coach of the Year Award. 13 (Auerbach, Brown, Chuck Daly, Fitch, Alex Hannum, Heinsohn, Holzman, Jackson, Kundla, Jack Ramsay, Riley, Sharman, and Wilkens) have been elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a coach. Several more have been enshrined as players or contributors. Fourteen of the head coaches also won championships as players, with both Buddy Jeannette and Bill Russell having won their only manager titles as player-coach. Riley and Lue are two of the only three coaches (Paul Westhead being the third) who have led teams to titles having only arrived in mid-season.

List of NBA players with most championships

This is a list of NBA players with most championships won as a player. The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a major professional basketball league in North America. It was founded in 1946 as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The league adopted its current name at the start of the 1949–50 season when it merged with the National Basketball League (NBL). The NBA Finals is the championship series for the NBA and the conclusion of the sport's postseason. The winning team of the series receives the Larry O'Brien Championship Trophy. Players from the winning team usually receive championship rings from the team honoring their contribution. However, in some rare occasion, the teams opted to give other commemorative items, such as wrist watches, instead of rings. The number of championships won by NBA superstars is often used as a measurement of their greatness.Boston Celtics center Bill Russell holds the record for the most NBA championships won with 11 titles during his 13-year playing career. He won his first championship with the Boston Celtics in his rookie year. Afterwards, he went on to win ten championships in the next 12 years, including eight consecutive championships from 1959 to 1966. He won the last two championships in 1968 and 1969 as player-coach. Russell's teammate, Sam Jones, won ten championships from 1959 to 1969, the second most in NBA history. Four Celtics players, Tom Heinsohn, K. C. Jones, Satch Sanders and John Havlicek, won eight championships each. Two other Celtics, Jim Loscutoff and Frank Ramsey, won seven championships each. Four players, Bob Cousy, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen, won six championships each. Jordan and Pippen are members of the Chicago Bulls team who won three consecutive championships twice in the 1990s. George Mikan won two championships in the NBL before it merged with the BAA to form the NBA, and won five championships in the NBA.

Robert Horry and John Salley are the only players to have won championships with three teams. Horry won seven championships: two with the Houston Rockets, three with the Los Angeles Lakers and another two with San Antonio Spurs. Salley's four NBA titles came via two championships with the Detroit Pistons and one each with the Bulls and the Lakers. Horry is also the only non-Celtic to win more than six times. Frank Saul, Steve Kerr and Patrick McCaw are the only players to win two championships with two teams in consecutive seasons. Saul won consecutive championships with the Rochester Royals and the Minneapolis Lakers in the 1950s,, Kerr won consecutive championships with the Bulls and the Spurs in the 1990s, McCaw with the Golden State Warriors and the Toronto Raptors in 2018 and 2019. Both Saul and Kerr were NBA champions four years in a row, each having participated in three-peats, Saul with the Lakers and Kerr with the Bulls.

NBA Championship ring

The NBA Championship ring is an annual award given by the National Basketball Association to the team that wins the NBA Finals.

Rings are presented to the team's players, coaches, and members of the executive front office. Red Auerbach has the most rings overall with 16. Phil Jackson has the most as coach and Bill Russell has the most as a player (11 each)

NBA Conference Finals

The National Basketball Association Conference Finals are the Eastern and Western championship series of the National Basketball Association (NBA), a major professional basketball league in North America. The NBA was founded in 1946 as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The NBA adopted its current name at the start of the 1949–50 season when the BAA merged with the National Basketball League (NBL). The league currently consists of 30 teams, of which 29 are located in the United States and 1 in Canada. Each team plays 82 games in the regular season. After the regular season, eight teams from each of the league's two conferences qualify for the playoffs. At the end of the playoffs, the top two teams play each other in the Conference Finals, to determine the Conference Champions from each side, who then proceed to play in the NBA Finals.

NBA Finals

The NBA Finals is the annual championship series of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Eastern and Western conference champions play a best-of-seven game series to determine the league champion. The winners of the Finals are awarded the Larry O'Brien Championship Trophy, which replaced the Walter A. Brown Trophy in 1983.

The series was initially known as the BAA Finals prior to the 1949–50 season when the Basketball Association of America (BAA) merged with the National Basketball League (NBL) to form the NBA. The competition oversaw further name changes to NBA World Championship Series from 1950 to 1985, as well as a brief stint as the Showdown, before settling on NBA Finals in 1986.The NBA Finals was initially structured to harbor a 2–2–1–1–1 format. In 1985, it was changed to a 2–3–2 format to ease the amount of cross country travel, where the first two and last two games of the series were played at the arena of the team who earned home-court advantage by having the better record during the regular season. In 2014, the 2–2–1–1–1 format was restored. The first two are played at home for the higher-seeded team, and the following two at the home of the lower-seeded team. The following three are played at each team's home arena alternately.A total of 19 franchises have won the NBA Finals, with the Toronto Raptors winning it in 2019. The Boston Celtics hold the record for the most victories, having won the competition 17 times, as well as winning the competition the most times in a row, winning it eight times from 1959 to 1966. The Los Angeles Lakers have contested the NBA Finals the most times, with 31 appearances. The Eastern Conference has provided the most champions, with 38 wins from ten franchises; the Western Conference has 32, from nine franchises.

National Basketball Association

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a men's professional basketball league in North America, composed of 30 teams (29 in the United States and 1 in Canada). It is one of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada, and is widely considered to be the premier men's professional basketball league in the world.

The league was founded in New York City on June 6, 1946, as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). It changed its the name to the National Basketball Association on August 3, 1949, after merging with the competing National Basketball League (NBL). The NBA's regular season runs from October to April, with each team playing 82 games. Its playoffs extend into June. NBA players are the world's best paid athletes by average annual salary per player.The NBA is an active member of USA Basketball (USAB), which is recognized by FIBA (also known as the International Basketball Federation) as the national governing body for basketball in the United States. The league's several international as well as individual team offices are directed out of its head offices in Midtown Manhattan, while its NBA Entertainment and NBA TV studios are directed out of offices located in Secaucus, New Jersey.

National Basketball Association awards and honors
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