List of Major League Baseball stolen base records

Stolen bases were not officially noted in a baseball game's summary until 1886, and it was not until 1888 that it officially earned a place in the box score.[1] The modern rule for stolen bases was adopted in 1898.[1] While some sources do not include stolen base records before 1898 because they are difficult to compare to the era after 1898, as the sourcing on the below list indicates, Major League Baseball continues to recognize them.[2]

No. Player SB Teams and seasons
Major League Baseball Career Stolen Base Leaders
1 Rickey Henderson 1,406 1979–84, 89–93, 94–95, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–89 (New York Yankees), 1993 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1996–97, 2001 (San Diego Padres), 1997 (Anaheim Angels), 1999–2000 (New York Mets), 2000 (Seattle Mariners), 2002 (Boston Red Sox), 2003 (Los Angeles Dodgers)
2 Lou Brock 938 1961–64 (Chicago Cubs), 1964–79 (St. Louis Cardinals)
3 Billy Hamilton 912 1888–89 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896–1901 (Boston Beaneaters)
4 Ty Cobb 892 1905–26 (Detroit Tigers), 1927–28 (Philadelphia Athletics)
5 Tim Raines 808 1979–90, 2001 (Montréal Expos), 1991–95 (Chicago White Sox), 1996–98 (New York Yankees), 1999 (Oakland Athletics), 2001 (Baltimore Orioles), 2002 (Florida Marlins)
6 Vince Coleman 752 1985–90 (St. Louis Cardinals), 1991–93, (New York Mets), 1994–95 (Kansas City Royals), 1995 (Seattle Mariners), 1996 (Cincinnati Reds), 1997 (Detroit Tigers)
7 Eddie Collins 745 1906–14, 27–30 (Philadelphia Athletics), 1915–26 (Chicago White Sox)
8 Arlie Latham 739 1880 (Buffalo Bisons), 1883–89, 96 (St. Louis Browns), 1890 (Chicago Pirates), 1890–1895 (Cincinnati Reds), 1899 (Washington Senators), 1909 (New York Giants)
9 Max Carey 738 1910–26 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 26–29 (Brooklyn Robins)
10 Honus Wagner 722 1897–99 (Louisville Colonels), 1900–17 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
11 Joe Morgan 689 1963–71, 80 (Houston Colt 45's/Astros), 1972–79 (Cincinnati Reds), 1981–82 (San Francisco Giants), 1983 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1984 (Oakland Athletics)
12 Willie Wilson 668 1976–90 (Kansas City Royals), 1991–92 (Oakland Athletics), 1993–94 (Chicago Cubs)
13 Tom Brown 657 1882 (Baltimore Orioles (AA)), 1883–84 (Columbus Colts (AA)), 1885–87 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 1887 (Indianapolis Hoosiers), 1888–89 (Boston Beaneaters), 1890–91 (Boston Reds (PL-AA)), 1892–94 (Louisville Colonels), 1895 (St. Louis Cardinals), 1895–98 (Washington Senators)
14 Bert Campaneris 649 1964–76 (KC-Oak Athletics), 1977–79 (Texas Rangers), 1979–81 (California Angels), 1983 (New York Yankees)
15 Kenny Lofton 622 1991 (Houston Astros), 1992–96, 98–2001, 07 (Cleveland Indians), 1997 (Atlanta Braves), 2002 (Chicago White Sox), 2002 (San Francisco Giants), 2003 (Chicago Cubs), 2003 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 2004 (New York Yankees), 2005 (Philadelphia Phillies), 2007 (Texas Rangers)
16 Otis Nixon 620 1983 (New York Yankees), 1984–87 (Cleveland Indians), 1988–90 (Montréal Expos), 1991–93, 99 (Atlanta Braves), 1994 (Boston Red Sox), 1995 (Texas Rangers), 1996–97 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1997 (Los Angeles Dodgers), 1998 (Minnesota Twins)
17 George Davis 616 1890–92 (Cleveland Spiders), 1893–1901, 03 (New York Giants), 1902, 1904–09 (Chicago White Sox)
18 Juan Pierre 614 2000–02 (Colorado Rockies), 2003–05 (Florida Marlins), 2006 (Chicago Cubs), 2007–09 (Los Angeles Dodgers), 2010–11 (Chicago White Sox), 2012 (Philadelphia Phillies), 2013 (Miami Marlins)
19 Dummy Hoy 594 1888–89 (Washington Nationals), 1890 (Buffalo Bisons), 1891 (St. Louis Browns), 1892–93 (Washington Senators), 1894–97 (Cincinnati Reds), 1898–99 (Louisville Colonels), 1901 (Chicago White Sox), 1902 (Cincinnati Reds)
20 Maury Wills 586 1959–66 (Los Angeles Dodgers), 1967–68 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 1969 (Montreal Expos), 1969–72 (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Source: [3]

Notes:

Top 10 career stolen bases by league

Baseball steal
Rickey Henderson steals a base as a member of the New York Yankees in 1988
American League Player SB National League Player SB
Rickey Henderson 1270[5] Lou Brock 938[6]
Ty Cobb 892[7] Billy Hamilton 782[8]
Eddie Collins 745[9] Max Carey 738[10]
Willie Wilson 660[11] Honus Wagner 722[12]
Bert Campaneris 649[13] Joe Morgan 681[14]
Luis Aparicio 506[15] Vince Coleman 660[16]
Paul Molitor 504[17] Tim Raines 635[18]
Kenny Lofton 502[19] Dummy Hoy 567[20]
Clyde Milan 495[21] Maury Wills 586[22]
Ichiro Suzuki 487[23] Ozzie Smith 580[24]

100 stolen bases, one season

Tommy McCarthy 1884
Tommy McCarthy stole 140 bases in 1890.

The pre-modern single-season mark for stolen bases is 140 by Tommy McCarthy of the St. Louis Browns in 1890. In the modern era, Ty Cobb set a single-season mark of 96 stolen bases in 1915[25] that lasted until it was broken by Maury Wills with 104 in 1962. A new modern mark was set by Lou Brock with 118 in 1974, and again by Rickey Henderson with 130 in 1982. Henderson and Vince Coleman are the only players to record three 100-steal seasons in the modern era. Coleman is the only player to do it three seasons in a row, much less in the first three season of his career, as well as the only player to record 100 steals as a rookie.

Player SB[26] Team Season
Tommy McCarthy 140 St. Louis Browns (AA) 1890
Hugh Nicol 138 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1887
Rickey Henderson 130 Oakland Athletics 1982
Arlie Latham 129 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1887
Lou Brock 118 St. Louis Cardinals 1974
Charles Comiskey 117 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1887
John Montgomery Ward 111 New York Giants 1887
Billy Hamilton 111 Philadelphia Phillies 1891
Vince Coleman 110 St. Louis Cardinals 1985 (r)
Arlie Latham 109 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1888
Vince Coleman 109 St. Louis Cardinals 1987
Rickey Henderson 108 Oakland Athletics 1983
Vince Coleman 107 St. Louis Cardinals 1986
Maury Wills 104 Los Angeles Dodgers 1962
Hugh Nicol 103 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1888
Jim Fogarty 102 Philadelphia Phillies 1887
Billy Hamilton 102 Philadelphia Phillies 1890
Rickey Henderson 100 Oakland Athletics 1980

Note: "(r)" designates a player's rookie season

5 stolen bases, one game

Carl Crawford on April 21, 2013
Carl Crawford is the most recent player to steal 6 bases in a game.

Under the pre-modern rule, George Gore stole 7 bases in a game in 1881, a mark that was tied by "Sliding Billy" Hamilton in 1894. In the modern era, Eddie Collins stole 6 bases in a game on two occasions, both in September 1912, a mark that stood alone for nearly eight decades before being tied by Otis Nixon (1991), Eric Young (1996), and Carl Crawford (2009).

Player SB[27] Team Date Opponent
George Gore 7 Chicago White Stockings June 25, 1881 Providence Grays
Billy Hamilton 7 Philadelphia Phillies August 31, 1894 Washington Senators
Eddie Collins 6 Philadelphia Athletics September 11, 1912 Detroit Tigers
Eddie Collins 6 Philadelphia Athletics September 22, 1912 St. Louis Browns
Otis Nixon 6 Atlanta Braves June 16, 1991 Montreal Expos
Eric Young 6 Colorado Rockies June 30, 1996 Los Angeles Dodgers
Carl Crawford 6 Tampa Bay Rays 3 May 2009 Boston Red Sox
Dan McGann 5 New York Giants 27 May 1904 Brooklyn Superbas
Clyde Milan 5 Washington Senators June 14, 1912 Cleveland Indians
Johnny Neun 5 Detroit Tigers July 9, 1927 1 New York Yankees
Amos Otis 5 Kansas City Royals September 7, 1971 Milwaukee Brewers
Davey Lopes 5 Los Angeles Dodgers August 24, 1974 St. Louis Cardinals
Bert Campaneris 5 Oakland Athletics 24 May 1976 Minnesota Twins
Lonnie Smith 5 St. Louis Cardinals September 4, 1982 San Francisco Giants
Alan Wiggins 5 San Diego Padres 17 May 1984 Montreal Expos
Tony Gwynn 5 San Diego Padres September 20, 1986 Houston Astros
Rickey Henderson 5 Oakland Athletics July 29, 1989 Seattle Mariners
Alex Cole 5 Cleveland Indians August 1, 1990 Kansas City Royals
Alex Cole 5 Cleveland Indians 3 May 1992 California Angels
Damian Jackson 5 San Diego Padres June 28, 1999 Colorado Rockies
Eric Young 5 Chicago Cubs 14 May 2000 Montreal Expos
Kenny Lofton 5 Cleveland Indians September 3, 2000 Baltimore Orioles
Scarborough Green 5 Texas Rangers September 28, 2000 Seattle Mariners
Ryan Freel 5 Cincinnati Reds July 27, 2005 Los Angeles Dodgers
Willy Taveras 5 Colorado Rockies June 14, 2008 Chicago White Sox
Dexter Fowler 5 Colorado Rockies April 27, 2009 San Diego Padres
Jacoby Ellsbury 5 Boston Red Sox May 30, 2013 Philadelphia Phillies
Billy Hamilton 5 Cincinnati Reds June 14, 2015 Chicago Cubs

35 consecutive stolen bases

Vince Coleman (31079627642) (cropped)
The record for consecutive steals is held by Vince Coleman, with 50.

Records for consecutive successful stolen base attempts are limited by the available data, as times caught stealing has been recorded officially only since 1920. Max Carey established a mark in 1922-23 of 36 consecutive stolen bases without being caught,[28] which stood until it was broken by Davey Lopes with 38 consecutive steals in 1975. Lopes's record was broken by Vince Coleman with 50 consecutive stolen bases in 1988-89.

Player SB[29] Team Start Ended
Vince Coleman 50 St. Louis Cardinals September 16, 1988 July 26, 1989
Ichiro Suzuki 45 Seattle Mariners April 29, 2006 16 May 2007
Tim Raines 40 Chicago White Sox July 23, 1993 September 1, 1995
Jimmy Rollins 39 Philadelphia Phillies September 1, 2007 July 26, 2008
Davey Lopes 38[28][30][31] Los Angeles Dodgers June 6, 1975 August 24, 1975
Tim Raines 37 Montreal Expos September 22, 1983 July 6, 1984
Stan Javier 37 Oak AthleticsSF Giants May 31, 1995 June 27, 1996
Max Carey 36 Pittsburgh Pirates July 7, 1922 May 13, 1923
Paul Molitor 36 Toronto Blue Jays August 22, 1993 October 1, 1995
Brady Anderson 36 Baltimore Orioles May 14, 1994 July 3, 1995
Coco Crisp 36 Oakland Athletics July 16, 2011 June 19, 2012
Davey Lopes 35 Oak Athletics-Chi Cubs July 11, 1983 May 18, 1985
Jimmy Rollins 35 Philadelphia Phillies May 9, 2001 August 25, 2001

Three or more seasons with 70 stolen bases

Under pre-modern rules, "Sliding Billy" Hamilton amassed six separate seasons of 70-plus stolen bases over his career. In the modern era, Ty Cobb established a mark of three such seasons that stood (though tied by Lou Brock and Omar Moreno) until it was broken by Tim Raines in 1984. In 1986, Raines reached six seasons of 70-plus steals, all consecutive (a record), but Rickey Henderson notched his seventh such season in 1989.

Player Seasons Seasons and teams
Rickey Henderson[5] 7 1980, 82–83 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–86, 88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics)
Billy Hamilton[8] 6 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–91, 94–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896 (Boston Beaneaters)
Tim Raines[18] 6 1981–86 (Montreal Expos)
Vince Coleman[16] 5 1985–88, 90 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Tom Brown[32] 3 1890–91 (Boston Reds (PL-AA)), 1892 (Louisville Colonels)
Harry Stovey[33] 3 1887–88 (Philadelphia Athletics (AA)), 1890 (Boston Reds (PL))
Ty Cobb[7] 3 1909, 11, 15 (Detroit Tigers)
Lou Brock[6] 3 1966, 73–74 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Omar Moreno[34] 3 1978–80 (Pittsburgh Pirates)

Ten or more seasons with 40 stolen bases

In 1924, Eddie Collins tied Billy Hamilton's pre-modern mark of ten seasons with 40-plus stolen bases. A year later, Max Carey also tied the record. The record was broken by Lou Brock in 1974. Brock eventually recorded a thirteenth 40-steal season, but was in turn surpassed by Rickey Henderson in 1993. Henderson eventually stole 40 bases in sixteen separate seasons.

Player Seasons Seasons and teams
Rickey Henderson[5] 16 1980–84, 90–92, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1993 (Oak Athletics-Tor Blue Jays), 1997 (SD PadresAna Angels)
Lou Brock[6] 13 1964 (Chi CubsStL Cardinals), 1965–76 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Tim Raines[18] 11 1981–87, 89–90 (Montreal Expos), 1991–92 (Chicago White Sox)
Billy Hamilton[8] 10 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896–98 (Boston Beaneaters)
Eddie Collins[9] 10 1909–10, 12–14 (Philadelphia Athletics), 1915–17, 23–24 (Chicago White Sox)
Max Carey[10] 10 1912–13, 16–18, 20, 22–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates)

Eight or more consecutive seasons with 40 stolen bases

Player Seasons Seasons and teams
Rickey Henderson[5] 14 1980–84, 90–92 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1993 (Oak Athletics-Tor Blue Jays)
Lou Brock[6] 13 1964 (Chi CubsStL Cardinals), 1965–76 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Billy Hamilton[8] 10 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896–98 (Boston Beaneaters)
Joe Morgan[14] 9 1969–71 (Houston Astros), 1972–77 (Cincinnati Reds)
Honus Wagner[12] 8 1901–08 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Otis Nixon[35] 8 1990 (Montreal Expos), 1991–93 (Atlanta Braves), 1994 (Boston Red Sox), 1995 (Texas Rangers), 1996 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1997 (Tor Blue Jays-LA Dodgers)
Juan Pierre[36] 8 2001–02 (Colorado Rockies), 2003–05 (Florida Marlins), 2006 (Chicago Cubs), 2007–08 (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Fifteen or more seasons with 20 stolen bases

Player Titles[37] Years and teams
Rickey Henderson[5] 23 1979–84, 89–93, 94–95, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1993 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1996–97, 2001 (San Diego Padres), 1997 (SD Padres-Anaheim Angels), 1999 (New York Mets), 2000 (NY Mets-Sea Mariners)
Honus Wagner[12] 18 1898–99 (Louisville Colonels), 1900–15 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
George Davis[38] 17 1890–92 (Cleveland Spiders), 1893–1901 (New York Giants), 1902, 1904–06, 08 (Chicago White Sox)
Ty Cobb[7] 17 1906–19, 21, 24 (Detroit Tigers), 1927 (Philadelphia Athletics)
Lou Brock[6] 16 1963 (Chicago Cubs), 1964 (Chi Cubs-Stl Cardinals), 1965–77, 79 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Ozzie Smith[24] 16 1978–81 (San Diego Padres), 1982–93 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Eddie Collins[9] 15 1909–14 (Philadelphia Athletics), 1915–20, 22–24 (Chicago White Sox)
Max Carey[10] 15 1911–18, 20–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 1927 (Brooklyn Robins)
Willie Wilson[11] 15 1978–90 (Kansas City Royals), 1991–92 (Oakland Athletics)

League leader in stolen bases, 5 or more seasons

Player Titles[39] Years and teams
Rickey Henderson 12 1980–84, 90–91, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–86, 88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics)
Max Carey 10 1913, 15–18, 20, 22–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Luis Aparicio 9 1956–62 (Chicago White Sox), 1963–64 (Baltimore Orioles)
Lou Brock 8 1966–69, 71–74 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Ty Cobb 6 1907, 09, 11, 15–17 (Detroit Tigers)
George Case 6 1939–43, 46 (Washington Senators)
Maury Wills 6 1960–65 (Los Angeles Dodgers)
Bert Campaneris 6 1965–68, 70, 72 (Oakland Athletics)
Vince Coleman 6 1985–90 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Billy Hamilton 5 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–91, 94–95 (Philadelphia Phillies)
Honus Wagner 5 1901–02, 04, 07–08 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Kenny Lofton 5 1992–96 (Cleveland Indians)

League leader in stolen bases, 4 or more consecutive seasons

Player Titles[39] Years and teams
Luis Aparicio 9 1956–62 (Chicago White Sox), 1963–64 (Baltimore Orioles)
Rickey Henderson 7 1980–84 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–86 (New York Yankees)
Maury Wills 6 1960–65 (Los Angeles Dodgers)
Vince Coleman 6 1985–90 (St. Louis Cardinals)
George Case 5 1939–43 (Washington Senators)
Kenny Lofton 5 1992–96 (Cleveland Indians)
Bob Bescher 4 1909–12 (Cincinnati Reds)
Max Carey 4 1915–18 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Max Carey 4 1922–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Willie Mays 4 1956–59 (San Francisco Giants)
Bert Campaneris 4 1965–68 (KC-Oak Athletics)
Lou Brock 4 1966–69 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Lou Brock 4 1971–74 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Tim Raines 4 1981–84 (Montreal Expos)
Rickey Henderson 4 1988 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1990–91 (Oakland Athletics)

League leader in stolen bases, two leagues

Player League, team and year[39]
Harry Stovey AA: Philadelphia Athletics (1886), PL: Boston Reds (1890)
Tom Brown AA: Boston Reds (1891), NL: Louisville Colonels (1893)
Billy Hamilton AA: Kansas City Blues (AA) (1889), NL: Philadelphia Phillies (1890–91, 94–95)
Ron LeFlore AL: Detroit Tigers (1978), NL: Montreal Expos (1980)
Juan Pierre NL: Colorado Rockies (2001), Florida Marlins (2003), AL: Chicago White Sox (2010)

League leader in stolen bases, three different teams

Player Teams and year[39]
Juan Pierre Colorado Rockies (2001), Florida Marlins (2003), Chicago White Sox (2010)

Eighty percent stolen base percentage (100+ attempts), career

Those marked in bold have at least 600 career stolen base attempts. Of those, Joe Morgan (in 1984) was the first to retire with a career stolen base percentage of at least 80%. His mark was successively surpassed by Davey Lopes (retired 1987), Willie Wilson, (retired 1994) and Tim Raines (retired 2002).

Player SB Attempts SB%[40]
Chase Utley 153 174 87.9%
Carlos Beltrán 312 361 86.4%
Tim Raines 808 954 84.7%
Eric Davis 349 415 84.1%
Willie Wilson 668 802 83.3%
Barry Larkin 379 456 83.11%
Tony Womack 363 437 83.07%
Davey Lopes 557 671 83.0%
Jimmy Rollins 470 575 81.7%
Carl Crawford 480 589 81.49%
Julio Cruz 343 421 81.47%
Ichiro Suzuki 509 626 81.3%
Alex Rodriguez 329 405 81.2%
Joe Morgan 689 851 80.96%
Vince Coleman 752 929 80.95%
Rickey Henderson 1406 1741 80.8%
Roberto Alomar 474 588 80.6%
José Reyes 513 639 80.3%

Ninety-five percent stolen base percentage, season, 30+ stolen bases

see notes2 3

Player SB%[41] SB Attempts Team Season
Brady Anderson 96.9% 31 32 Baltimore Orioles 1994
Carlos Beltrán 96.9% 31 32 Kansas City Royals 2001
Max Carey 96.2% 51 53 Pittsburgh Pirates 1922
Ichiro Suzuki 95.74% 45 47 Seattle Mariners 2006

350 stolen bases by a team in one season

SB[42] Team Season
581 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1887
527 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1887
469 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1888
468 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1888
462 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1889
415 New York Giants 1887
409 Brooklyn Grays (AA) 1887
409 Brooklyn Grooms 1892
389 Brooklyn Bridegrooms (AA) 1889
382 Chicago White Stockings 1887
373 Boston Beaneaters 1887
355 Philadelphia Phillies 1887
350 Cincinnati Reds 1896

290 stolen bases by a team in one season, 1901 or later

SB[42] Team Season
347 New York Giants 1911
341 Oakland Athletics 1976
319 New York Giants 1912
314 St. Louis Cardinals 1985
310 Cincinnati Reds 1910
296 New York Giants 1913
291 New York Giants 1905
290 Cincinnati Reds 1911

See also

Notes

  1. Game 2 of a doubleheader.
  2. Minimum 20 stolen base attempts.
  3. The Major League Baseball (MLB) reference for this statistic lists Carlos Beltrán as having a 100% stolen base percentage in 2004. However, examination of the statistics shows that Beltrán was 28/28 in stolen bases with the Houston Astros, but went 14/17 after being traded from the Kansas City Royals mid-season.[43] While 28/28 is the National League leader for that season, the combined 42/45 (93.3%) does not make Beltrán eligible for this list. Similarly, Dave Roberts is listed by MLB as having a 97.1% stolen base percentage in 2004. Roberts was 33/34 in stolen bases with the Los Angeles Dodgers before being traded mid-season to the Boston Red Sox where he was 5/7 in stolen bases.[44] Roberts' combined 38/41 (92.7%) does not make him eligible for this list.

References

  1. ^ a b Thorn, John (ed); Palmer, Pete (ed); et al. (1997), Total Baseball (Fifth ed.), New York (USA): Viking, p. 2415, ISBN 0-670-87511-2CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  2. ^ Nemec, David (1993), Great Baseball Feats, Facts & Firsts, New York: Signet, p. 354, ISBN 0-451-16124-6
  3. ^ a b "STATISTICS: All-Time Totals, MLB, sorted by SB". MLB.com. Retrieved May 14, 2019.
  4. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Stolen Bases". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 14, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e "Rickey Henderson". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Lou Brock". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  7. ^ a b c "Ty Cobb". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  8. ^ a b c d "Billy Hamilton". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  9. ^ a b c "Eddie Collins". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  10. ^ a b c "Max Carey". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  11. ^ a b "Willie Wilson". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  12. ^ a b c "Honus Wagner". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  13. ^ "Bert Campaneris". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  14. ^ a b "Joe Morgan". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  15. ^ "Luis Aparicio". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  16. ^ a b "Vince Coleman". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  17. ^ "Paul Molitor". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  18. ^ a b c "Time Raines". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  19. ^ "Kenny Lofton". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  20. ^ "Dummy Hoy". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  21. ^ "Clyde Milan". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  22. ^ "Maury Wills". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  23. ^ "Ichiro Suzuki". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. August 14, 2016. Retrieved August 14, 2016.
  24. ^ a b "Ozzie Smith". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  25. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/SB_season.shtml
  26. ^ "League Leaders: Hitting Leaders, Career Single Season". statistical list. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  27. ^ "Stolen Base Records". statistical list. Baseball Almanac.com. October 16, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.
  28. ^ a b Steve Brener, Dave Lopes, New Champion of Major League Base Stealers, Baseball Digest, March 1976, p.58, accessed November 23, 2010.
  29. ^ Joseph, Brian (July 12, 2008). "How Rollins' Rare Feat Stacks Up Historically". SemHeads.com. Retrieved October 17, 2010.
  30. ^ The Fans Speak Out, Baseball Digest, December 1989, p.12, accessed November 23, 2010.
  31. ^ John R. Finger, Phillies Hope to Get Running Game Going, CSNPhilly.com, May 13, 2009, accessed November 23, 2010.
  32. ^ "Tom Brown". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  33. ^ "Harry Stovey". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  34. ^ "Omar Moreno". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  35. ^ "Otis Nixon". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  36. ^ "Juan Pierre". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  37. ^ "Yearly League Leaders & Records for Runs Batted In". statistical list. Baseball-Reference.com. October 10, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  38. ^ "George Davis". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 13, 2010. Retrieved October 14, 2010.
  39. ^ a b c d "Yearly League Leaders & Records for Stolen Bases". statistical list. Baseball-Reference.com. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010.
  40. ^ "Yearly League Leaders & Records for Stolen Bases". statistical list. Baseball-Reference.com. October 15, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.
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  43. ^ "Carlos Beltran". statistical list. Major League Baseball. October 15, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.
  44. ^ "Dave Roberts". statistical list. Major League Baseball. October 15, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.
Bert Campaneris

Dagoberto Campaneris Blanco (born March 9, 1942), nicknamed "Bert" or "Campy", is a Cuban American former professional baseball shortstop, who played Major League Baseball (MLB) for four American League (AL) teams, primarily the Kansas City and Oakland Athletics. One of the mainstays of the Athletics' championship teams of 1972 to 1974, he holds the A's franchise records for career games played (1795), hits (1882), and at bats (7180). Campaneris led the AL in stolen bases six times between 1965 and 1972 and retired with the seventh-most steals in MLB history (649). Defensively, he led the league in putouts three times; his career totals at shortstop place him among the all-time MLB leaders in games played (5th, 2097) and double plays (7th, 1186), at that position. Campaneris is the cousin of former MLB player Jose Cardenal.

Billy Hamilton (baseball, born 1866)

William Robert "Sliding Billy" Hamilton (February 16, 1866 – December 15, 1940) was an American professional baseball player in Major League Baseball (MLB) during the 19th-century. He was notable for his offensive skills as a hitter and as a base stealer. He played for the Kansas City Cowboys, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Beaneaters between 1888 and 1901. Hamilton was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1961. As of early 2019, he is third on the all-time list of career stolen bases leaders.

Carl Crawford

Carl Demonte Crawford (born August 5, 1981), nicknamed "The Perfect Storm", is an American former professional baseball left fielder. He batted and threw left-handed.

Crawford was drafted by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in the second round (52nd overall) of the 1999 Major League Baseball draft. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Rays, Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers. When he last played, Crawford had more triples (123) than any other active baseball player.

Davey Lopes

David Earle Lopes (; born May 3, 1945) is an American former second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB). He batted and threw right-handed. He played in MLB for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Oakland Athletics, Chicago Cubs, and Houston Astros; he managed the Milwaukee Brewers.

Eddie Collins

Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. (May 2, 1887 – March 25, 1951), nicknamed "Cocky", was an American professional baseball player, manager and executive. He played as a second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1906 to 1930 for the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox. A graduate of Columbia University, Collins holds major league career records in several categories and is among the top few players in several other categories. In 1925, Collins became just the sixth person to join the 3,000 hit club – and the last for the next 17 seasons. His 47 career home runs mark the lowest home run total for a member of the aforementioned 3,000 hit club.

Collins coached and managed in the major leagues after retiring as a player. He also served as general manager of the Boston Red Sox. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

George Gore

George F. Gore (May 3, 1854 – September 16, 1933), nicknamed "Piano Legs", was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for 14 seasons, eight for the Chicago White Stockings, five for the New York Giants, one for the St. Louis Browns (1892) of the National League (NL), and the New York Giants of the Players' League (1890).

Born in Saccarappa, Maine, Gore led the NL in several seasonal offensive categories. He won his only batting title in 1880 while playing for Chicago, along with league leading totals in on-base percentage and slugging percentage. He also led the league twice in runs scored, bases on balls three times, and games played by a center fielder once. Gore was also the all-time leader for most errors by major league outfielder upon his retirement with 368 total, including a record 346 errors in the National League, records he still holds today. (He made 217 errors for Chicago; 122 for New York; and seven for St. Louis, all National League teams; and 22 for the New York Giants of the Players' League.)Gore played for many successful teams throughout his career. During his eight seasons with the White Stockings, they won the league title five times, including appearances in two World Series. Chicago played the St. Louis Browns in both 1885, which ended in a series tie, and 1886, with St. Louis winning the championship. He was also a member of the New York Giants' two National League championship teams in 1888 and 1889. Both Giants teams went on to claim World Series victories, against the St. Louis Browns in 1888, and the Brooklyn Bridegrooms in 1889.

Twice he set single-game records, one for stealing seven bases, and the other for collecting five extra-base hits. Although he had statistics that put him consistently among the seasonal league leaders, he reportedly had a poor work ethic resulting from an active social life outside of baseball. This behavior did not endear him to his team captain, Cap Anson, which caused them to feud during Gore's time in Chicago. After his career, he had major financial difficulties, having to move from job to job just to support his bare necessities. He died at the age of 79 in Utica, New York.

Hugh Nicol

Hugh N. Nicol (January 1, 1858 – June 27, 1921) was a Scottish-American professional baseball player. An outfielder, Nicol played in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Stockings, St. Louis Browns, Cincinnati Red Stockings, and Cincinnati Reds. Nicol's debut game took place on May 3, 1881. His final game took place on August 2, 1890.

Nicol had 138 stolen bases in 1887, however prior to 1898 a stolen base was credited to a baserunner who reached an extra base on a hit from another player. He had 103 stolen bases in 1888. Despite the fact that he had two 100 stolen-base seasons, only 383 of his total career stolen bases are known. He also managed the Browns in 1897.

Nicol became the head baseball coach and athletic director at Purdue University for the Purdue Boilermakers. He also scouted for the Reds during the summers, beginning in 1911. Nicol resigned from Purdue in 1914, after accusations that the American football team played like "rowdies." He died in Lafayette, Indiana on June 27, 1921.

Juan Pierre

Juan D'Vaughn Pierre (born August 14, 1977) is an American former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 2000–2013 for the Colorado Rockies, Florida/Miami Marlins, Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago White Sox, and Philadelphia Phillies. Known for his speed, he stole 614 bases in his career, the 18th-most in MLB history at the time of his retirement. He worked as an MLB Network on-air analyst before joining the Marlins as a Minor League Outfield Coordinator for the 2019 season.

List of Major League Baseball annual stolen base leaders

Major League Baseball recognizes stolen base leaders in the American League and National League each season.

Lou Brock

Louis Clark Brock (born June 18, 1939) is an American former professional baseball player. He began his 19-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career playing in 1961 for the Chicago Cubs, and spent the majority of his career playing as a left fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985 and the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in 2014. He is currently a special instructor coach for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Brock was best known for breaking Ty Cobb's all-time major league stolen base record in 1977. He was an All-Star for six seasons and a National League (NL) stolen base leader for eight seasons. He led the NL in doubles and triples in 1968. He also led the NL in singles in 1972, and was the runner-up for the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1974.

Luis Aparicio

Luis Ernesto Aparicio Montiel (born April 29, 1934), nicknamed "Little Louie", is a former professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop from 1956 to 1973, most notably for the Chicago White Sox. He became known for his exceptional fielding and base stealing skills, and is the first Venezuelan player to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.Aparicio won the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year Award in 1956. He helped the "Go-Go" White Sox win the AL championship in 1959 and was the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) runner-up that season (he led the AL in stolen bases, putouts, assists, and fielding as shortstop). He was an AL All-Star for ten seasons, an AL stolen base leader for 9 consecutive seasons, and an AL Gold Glove winner for 9 seasons.MLB legend Ted Williams called Aparicio "the best shortstop he had ever seen". He was nominated for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team (one-hundred greatest players) in 1999.

Maury Wills

Maurice Morning Wills (born October 2, 1932) is an American former professional baseball player and manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) primarily for the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1959 through 1966 and the latter part of 1969 through 1972 as a shortstop and switch-hitter; he played for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1967 and 1968, and the Montreal Expos the first part of 1969. Wills was an essential component of the Dodgers' championship teams in the mid-1960s, and is credited for reviving the stolen base as part of baseball strategy.Wills was an All-Star for five seasons and seven All-Star Games, and was the first MLB All-Star Game Most Valuable Player in 1962. He also was the National League Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1962, and a Gold Glove winner in 1961 and 1962. In a fourteen-year career, Wills batted .281 with 20 home runs, 458 runs batted in, 2,134 hits, 1,067 runs, 177 doubles, 71 triples, and 586 stolen bases in 1,942 games. Since 2009, Wills is a member of the Los Angeles Dodgers organization serving as a representative of the Dodgers Legend Bureau.

In 2014, Wills appeared for the first time as a candidate on the National Baseball Hall of Fame's Golden Era Committee election ballot for possible Hall of Fame consideration in 2015 which required 12 votes. Wills missed getting elected by 3 votes. All the other candidates on the ballot also missed being elected. The Committee meets and votes on ten selected candidates from the 1947 to 1972 era every three years.

Max Carey

Maximillian George Carnarius (January 11, 1890 – May 30, 1976), known as Max George Carey, was an American professional baseball center fielder and manager. Carey played in Major League Baseball for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1910 through 1926 and for the Brooklyn Robins from 1926 through 1929. He managed the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1932 and 1933.

Carey starred for the Pirates, helping them win the 1925 World Series. During his 20-year career, he led the league in stolen bases ten times and finished with 738 steals, a National League record until 1974 and still the 9th-highest total in major league history. Carey was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1961.

Otis Nixon

Otis Junior Nixon (born January 9, 1959) is an American former professional baseball center fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, Montreal Expos, Atlanta Braves, Boston Red Sox, Texas Rangers, Toronto Blue Jays, Los Angeles Dodgers, and Minnesota Twins between 1983 and 1999. He has stolen the most bases for a player who has never appeared in an MLB All-Star game since the All-Star Game was inaugurated in 1933.

Stolen base

In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a runner advances to a base to which he is not entitled and the official scorer rules that the advance should be credited to the action of the runner. The umpires determine whether the runner is safe or out at the next base, but the official scorer rules on the question of credit or blame for the advance under Rule 10.A stolen base most often occurs when a base runner advances to the next base while the pitcher is pitching the ball to home plate.

Successful base stealers are not only fast but have good baserunning instincts and timing.

Stolen base percentage

Stolen base percentage is a statistic used in baseball.

A player's stolen base percentage (a.k.a. SB%) measures his rate of success in stealing bases. Because stolen bases tend to help a team less than times caught stealing hurt, a player needs to have a high stolen base percentage in order to contribute much value to his team. A commonly used figure is that a player needs to succeed about 2/3 of the time to break even.

With 300 minimum career attempts, Carlos Beltrán currently holds the record for highest Stolen base percentage in the Major Leagues, with .881, with Tim Raines in second, with .847.

Total Baseball developed a statistic related to stolen base percentage called "Stolen Base Runs" or SBR.

(.3 x Stolen Bases) - (.6 x Caught Stealing)

This Total Baseball statistic is aimed at quantifying base-stealing. Numerous statistical studies done by Total Baseball have shown that the break even success rate for steals (the rate at which an attempt to steal is neither helping nor hurting the team in terms of total runs scored) is about 67%. Each successful steal adds approximately .3 runs to a team's total runs scored which is much less than often believed. Therefore, the statistic is meant to estimate the impact of base-stealers, which, other than the elite base-stealers, rarely amounts to more than a few runs per year for each team.

Tim Raines

Timothy Raines Sr. (born September 16, 1959), nicknamed "Rock", is an American professional baseball coach and former player. He played as a left fielder in Major League Baseball for six teams from 1979 to 2002 and was best known for his 13 seasons with the Montreal Expos. He is regarded as one of the best leadoff hitters and baserunners in baseball history. In 2013, Raines began working in the Toronto Blue Jays organization as a roving outfield and baserunning instructor.Raines is the 1986 NL batting champion, a seven-time All-Star, and four-time stolen base champion. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2017.

Vince Coleman

Vincent Maurice Coleman (born September 22, 1961) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) player, best known for his years with the St. Louis Cardinals. Primarily a left fielder, Coleman played from 1985 to 1997 and set a number of stolen base records. He was a switch hitter and threw right-handed. He was a baserunning consultant

for the Chicago White Sox during the 2015 season. He was hired by the San Francisco Giants in 2017 as a minor-league baserunning and outfield coach.

Willie Wilson (baseball)

Willie James Wilson (born July 9, 1955) is a former professional baseball player. He played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball for the Kansas City Royals, Oakland Athletics, and Chicago Cubs. He was an outfielder known for his speed and ability as an effective leadoff hitter. Wilson's career total of 668 stolen bases currently ranks him in 12th place all-time among major leaguers.

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