List of Major League Baseball single-game strikeout leaders

Roger Clemens (left) and Randy Johnson (right) are the only pitchers to strike out 18 or more batters in a nine-inning game on three separate occasions.

062707 417 Roger Clemens
Randy Johnson 04

In baseball, a strikeout occurs when a pitcher throws three strikes to a batter during his time at bat.[1] Twenty different pitchers have struck out at least 18 batters in a single nine-inning Major League Baseball (MLB) game as of 2016,[a] the most recent being Max Scherzer of the Washington Nationals on May 11, 2016.[4] Four players have accomplished the feat more than once in their career; no player has ever struck out more than 20 batters in a nine-inning game. Charlie Sweeney was the first player to strike out 18 batters in a single game, doing so for the Providence Grays against the Boston Beaneaters on June 7, 1884.[5] In spite of this, Bob Feller is viewed as the first pitcher to accomplish the feat,[6][7] since his then-record 18 strikeouts was the first to occur during the 20th century and the live-ball era.[8]

Out of the twenty pitchers who have accomplished the feat, fifteen were right-handed and five pitched left-handed. Five of these players have played for only one major league team. Five pitchers—Steve Carlton, Roger Clemens, Randy Johnson, Nolan Ryan and Tom Seaver—are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club. Sweeney has the fewest career strikeouts in the group with 505, while Nolan Ryan, with 5,714, struck out more batters than any other pitcher in major league history.[9] Bill Gullickson and Kerry Wood are the only rookies to have achieved the feat.[10][11] Tom Seaver concluded his milestone game by striking out the final ten batters he faced, setting a new major league record for most consecutive strikeouts.[12][13]

Of the eleven players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who have struck out 18 batters in a game, six have been elected; all six were elected on the first ballot.[14] Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 major league seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months.[15] These requirements leave two players ineligible who are active, two players ineligible who are living and have played in the past five seasons, and five who did not play in 10 major league seasons.

Players

Kerry Wood 2008
Kerry Wood tied Roger Clemens' major league record of 20 strikeouts in a nine-inning game on May 6, 1998.
Sandy Koufax
Sandy Koufax is one of six pitchers who have 18 strikeouts in a game to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bob Feller
Bob Feller was the first player to achieve 18 strikeouts in a game during the live-ball era.
2016-10-13 Max Scherzer pitch NLDS Game 5 for the Nationals 05 (cropped)
Max Scherzer tied Kerry Wood and Roger Clemens' major league record of 20 strikeouts in a nine-inning game in 2016.
Nolan Ryan in Atlanta close-up
Nolan Ryan amassed 18 or more strikeouts in a nine-inning game twice, as well as 19 strikeouts in extra-inning games three times.
Key
Pitcher Name of the pitcher
Date Date of the game
Team The player's team at the time of the game
Opposing team The team against whom the pitcher struck out 18 players
Score Final score of the game, with the player's team score listed first
Strikeouts Number of strikeouts the pitcher recorded
Career Ks Career strikeouts
dagger Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
* Player is active
double-dagger Indicates the player's team lost the game

MLB pitchers with 18 strikeouts in a nine-inning game

MLB pitchers with 18 strikeouts in a nine-inning game
Pitcher Date Team Opposing team Score Strikeouts Career Ks Refs
Max Scherzer* May 11, 2016 Washington Nationals Detroit Tigers 3–2 20 2,638 [16][17]
Kerry Wood May 6, 1998 Chicago Cubs Houston Astros 2–0 20 1,582 [11][18]
Roger Clemens September 18, 1996 Boston Red Sox Detroit Tigers 4–0 20 4,672 [19][20]
Roger Clemens April 29, 1986 Boston Red Sox Seattle Mariners 3–1 20 4,672 [20][21]
Randy Johnsondagger August 8, 1997 Seattle Mariners Chicago White Sox 5–0 19 4,875 [22][23]
Randy Johnsondagger June 24, 1997 Seattle Mariners Oakland Athletics 1–4double-dagger 19 4,875 [23][24]
David Cone October 6, 1991 New York Mets Philadelphia Phillies 7–0 19 2,668 [25][26]
Nolan Ryandagger August 12, 1974 California Angels Boston Red Sox 4–2 19 5,714 [27][28]
Tom Seaverdagger April 22, 1970 New York Mets San Diego Padres 2–1 19 3,640 [29][30]
Steve Carltondagger September 15, 1969 St. Louis Cardinals New York Mets 3–4double-dagger 19 4,136 [31][32]
Hugh Daily July 7, 1884 Chicago Browns Boston Reds 10–4 19 846 [33][34]
Charlie Sweeney June 7, 1884 Providence Grays Boston Beaneaters 2–1 19 505 [35][36]
Corey Kluber* May 13, 2015 Cleveland Indians St. Louis Cardinals 2–0 18 1,461 [37][38]
Ben Sheets May 16, 2004 Milwaukee Brewers Atlanta Braves 4–1 18 1,325 [39][40]
Roger Clemens August 25, 1998 Toronto Blue Jays Kansas City Royals 3–0 18 4,672 [20][41]
Randy Johnsondagger September 27, 1992 Seattle Mariners Texas Rangers 2–3double-dagger 18 4,875 [23][42]
Ramón Martínez June 4, 1990 Los Angeles Dodgers Atlanta Braves 6–0 18 1,427 [43][44]
Bill Gullickson September 10, 1980 Montreal Expos Chicago Cubs 4–2 18 1,279 [10][45]
Ron Guidry June 17, 1978 New York Yankees California Angels 4–0 18 1,778 [46][47]
Nolan Ryandagger September 10, 1976 California Angels Chicago White Sox 3–2 18 5,714 [28][48]
Don Wilson July 14, 1968 Houston Astros Cincinnati Reds 6–1 18 1,283 [49][50]
Sandy Koufaxdagger April 24, 1962 Los Angeles Dodgers Chicago Cubs 10–2 18 2,396 [51][52]
Sandy Koufaxdagger August 31, 1959 Los Angeles Dodgers San Francisco Giants 5–2 18 2,396 [52][53]
Bob Fellerdagger October 2, 1938 Cleveland Indians Detroit Tigers 1–4double-dagger 18 2,581 [54][55]
Henry Porter October 3, 1884 Milwaukee Brewers Boston Reds 4–5double-dagger 18 659 [56][57]
Dupee Shaw July 19, 1884 Boston Reds St. Louis Maroons 0–1double-dagger 18 950 [58][59]

18 strikeouts in extra-inning games

Seven different pitchers have struck out at least 18 batters in an extra-inning Major League Baseball (MLB) game to date. Only Nolan Ryan accomplished the feat more than once in his career and no player has ever struck out more than 21 batters in a game.

The following list is kept separate from the above list of pitchers who have struck out 18 or more batters in a nine-inning game. This is due to the differing number of innings pitched during an extra-inning game, the lack of a definitive endpoint to the game that would otherwise allow for a fair comparison to be made, and the advantage of having more opportunities to strike out players during an extra-inning game as opposed to one lasting nine innings.

Key
IP Innings pitched by the pitcher in the game
MLB pitchers with 18 strikeouts in an extra-inning game
Pitcher Date Team Opposing team Score Strikeouts IP Career Ks Refs
Tom Cheney September 12, 1962 Washington Senators Baltimore Orioles 2–1 21 16 345 [60][61]
Randy Johnsondagger May 8, 2001 Arizona Diamondbacks Cincinnati Reds 4–3 20 9[b] 4,875 [23][62]
Luis Tiant July 3, 1968 Cleveland Indians Minnesota Twins 1–0 19 10 2,416 [63][64]
Nolan Ryandagger June 14, 1974 California Angels Boston Red Sox 4–3 19 13 5,714 [28][65]
Nolan Ryandagger August 20, 1974 California Angels Detroit Tigers 0–1double-dagger 19 11 5,714 [28][66]
Nolan Ryandagger June 8, 1977 California Angels Toronto Blue Jays 2–1 19 10 5,714 [28][67]
Warren Spahndagger June 14, 1952 Boston Braves Chicago Cubs 1–3double-dagger 18 15 2,583 [68][69]
Chris Short October 2, 1965 Philadelphia Phillies New York Mets 0–0 18 15 1,629 [70][71]
Jim Maloney June 14, 1965 Cincinnati Reds New York Mets 0–1double-dagger 18 11 1,605 [72][73]

21+ Ks in 9 innings by 2+ pitchers

On 14-May-2019, Boston Red Sox became the first team to strike out more than 20 batters over the first 9 innings. The game went to extra innings and Colorado Rockies won 5-4 over 11 innings.
Chris Sale : 17 strikeouts in 7 innings
Brandon Workman : 2 SOs in 8th inning
Matt Barnes : 2 Ks in 9th inning (17+2+2 = 21 Ks in 9 innings)
Matt Barnes : 3 more Ks in 10th inning
Ryan Brasier : Zero Ks in 11th inning (Total 24 Ks in 11 innings)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ 18 strikeouts is utilized as the benchmark because it signifies approximately ​23 of a nine-inning game's 27 outs were made by a single pitcher via a strikeout ("approximately" due to the fact that a pitcher can record more than three strikeouts in an inning with the uncaught third strike rule).[2][3]
  2. ^ Although the game went into extra innings (11 total), Johnson was relieved by Byung-hyun Kim after nine innings.[62]

References

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External links

Bill Gullickson

William Lee Gullickson (born February 20, 1959 in Marshall, Minnesota) is a former major league baseball pitcher who played for six different major-league teams, in Canada, the U.S. and Japan, during an 18-year professional career, of which 14 seasons were spent in MLB.

Bob Feller

Robert William Andrew Feller (November 3, 1918 – December 15, 2010), nicknamed "The Heater from Van Meter", "Bullet Bob", and "Rapid Robert", was an American baseball pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cleveland Indians. Feller pitched from 1936 to 1941 and from 1945 to 1956, interrupted only by a four-year engagement in the Navy. In a career spanning 570 games, Feller pitched 3,827 innings and posted a win–loss record of 266–162, with 279 complete games, 44 shutouts, and a 3.25 earned run average (ERA).

A prodigy who bypassed the minor leagues, Feller first played for the Indians at the age of 17. His career was interrupted by four years of military service in World War II, during which time he served as Chief Petty Officer aboard the USS Alabama. Feller became the first pitcher to win 24 games in a season before the age of 21. During his career, he threw no-hitters in 1940, 1946, and 1951. Feller also recorded 12 one-hitters (his no-hitters and one-hitters were records at the time of his retirement). He helped the Indians win a World Series title in 1948 and an American League-record 111 wins and the pennant in 1954. Feller led the American League in wins six times and in strikeouts seven times. In 1946, he recorded 348 strikeouts, a total not exceeded for 19 years. An eight-time All-Star, Feller was ranked 36th on Sporting News's list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players and was named the publication's "greatest pitcher of his time". He was a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

Baseball Hall of Fame member Ted Williams called Feller "the fastest and best pitcher I ever saw during my career." Hall of Famer Stan Musial believed he was "probably the greatest pitcher of our era." He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962 on his first ballot appearance; at the time only three players ever had a higher percentage of ballot votes. He was elected the inaugural President of the Major League Baseball Players' Association and participated in exhibition games which featured players from both the Major and Negro Leagues. Feller died at the age of 92 in 2010.

Charlie Sweeney

Charles Joseph Sweeney (April 13, 1863 – April 4, 1902) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher from 1883 through 1887. He played for the Providence Grays, St. Louis Maroons, and Cleveland Blues, and is best known for his performance in 1884, when he won 41 games.

Corey Kluber

Corey Scott Kluber (born April 10, 1986), nicknamed Klubot, is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his MLB debut in 2011, as a member of the Indians. A power pitcher, Kluber achieves high strikeout rates through a two-seam sinker and a breaking ball that variously resembles a slider and a curveball.

A three-time MLB All-Star, Kluber is a two-time winner of the Cy Young Award in the American League (AL) including in 2014, his second full season in the major leagues, and in 2017. In 2016, he was named the Sporting News AL Starting Pitcher of the Year. He led the major leagues in earned run average (ERA) in 2017, and has twice led the AL in wins. On May 13, 2015, Kluber became one of 20 pitchers in major league history to strike out at least 18 batters in a nine-inning game, doing so versus the St. Louis Cardinals. In 2018, Kluber notched his first 20-win season.

A native of Birmingham, Alabama, Kluber played high school baseball for Coppell High School in Coppell, Texas. He then attended Stetson University in DeLand, Florida, where he was named Atlantic Sun Conference Pitcher of the Year in 2007, and was inducted into the Stetson Athletics Hall of Fame in 2014. The San Diego Padres selected Kluber in fourth round of the 2007 draft, and traded him to the Indians in 2010 as part of a three-team transaction. Kluber established himself in the Indians' starting rotation in 2013. He is signed through 2019, after agreeing to a five-year, $38.5 million contract extension with the Indians in April 2015. The Indians hold club options on Kluber's contract for the 2020 and 2021 seasons.

David Cone

David Brian Cone (born January 2, 1963) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher, and current color commentator for the New York Yankees on the YES Network and WPIX. A third round draft pick of the Kansas City Royals in 1981 MLB Draft, he made his MLB debut in 1986 and continued playing until 2003, pitching for five different teams. Cone batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

Cone pitched the sixteenth perfect game in baseball history in 1999. On the final game of the 1991 regular season, he struck out 19 batters, tied for second-most ever in a game. The 1994 Cy Young Award winner, he was a five-time All-Star and led the major leagues in strikeouts each season from 1990–92. A two-time 20 game-winner, he set the MLB record for most years between 20-win seasons with 10.

He was a member of five World Series championship teams – 1992 with the Toronto Blue Jays and 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000 with the New York Yankees. His 8–3 career postseason record came over 21 games and 111 innings pitched, with an earned run average (ERA) of 3.80; in World Series play, his ERA was 2.12.Cone is the subject of the book, A Pitcher's Story: Innings With David Cone, by Roger Angell. Cone and Jack Curry co-wrote the autobiography Full Count: The Education of a Pitcher, which was released in May 2019 and made the New York Times Best Seller list shortly after its release.

Don Wilson (baseball)

Donald Edward Wilson, (February 12, 1945 – January 5, 1975) was a professional baseball pitcher. He played all or part of nine seasons in Major League Baseball with the Houston Astros.

Hugh Daily

Hugh Ignatius Daily, born Harry Criss (July 17, 1847 – after 1923), nicknamed "One Arm" Daily, was an Irish American professional right-handed pitcher who played six seasons, for seven different teams; the Buffalo Bisons, the Cleveland Blues, and the St. Louis Maroons of the National League, Chicago Browns and Washington Nationals of the Union Association, and the Cleveland Blues of the American Association. He was known for having a surly disposition and was not well liked by baseball executives, which occasioned his frequent change of teams. However, he was a favourite of fans wherever he played.

Daily was successful as a starting pitcher early in his major league career. In 1883 and 1884, he won 20 or more games each season, while finishing in the top ten among league leaders in major pitching categories such as earned run average (as calculated retroactively, since E.R.A. was not an official statistic at the time), innings pitched, complete games, and strikeouts. Daily established the pitching record for strikeouts in a season (later surpassed), tied a record by tossing two consecutive one-hitters, broke the record for one-hitters in a season, and threw a no-hitter. After his initial three years of success, the final three years of his career were marked by quick decline in his seasonal numbers, and he was gone from organised baseball shortly thereafter. Today he remains a mysterious figure, as there is little record of his activities after his career. It is unclear where he lived and where he died.

Kerry Wood

Kerry Lee Wood (born June 16, 1977) is an American former baseball pitcher who played 14 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians, and New York Yankees. Wood first came to prominence as a 20-year-old rookie when he recorded 20 strikeouts in a one-hit shutout against the Houston Astros, which some have argued may be the greatest single-game pitching performance in MLB history. The game also made Wood the co-holder of the MLB record for strikeouts in a single game (20), and earned Wood the nickname Kid K. He was later named the 1998 National League Rookie of the Year. Wood would go on to record over 200 strikeouts in four out of his first five seasons, with a high of 266 in 2003, and holds several MLB strikeout records.

Though he struggled with injuries throughout his career, Wood was twice named an All-Star. Wood transitioned to a relief pitcher in 2007 due to continued struggles with injuries, ultimately reviving his career as a closer. During his career Wood was placed on the disabled list 14 times in 14 major league seasons, which included missing the entire 1999 season due to Tommy John surgery. After a slow start to the 2012 season, Wood retired on May 18, 2012.

Max Scherzer

Maxwell M. Scherzer (born July 27, 1984) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball (MLB). Nicknamed “Mad Max”, he made his MLB debut as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2008, and later played for the Detroit Tigers. He has been an important figure in the both the Tigers' and Nationals' playoff presence, including Detroit's four consecutive American League Central titles from 2011 to 2014 and two of Washington's National League East titles. A power pitcher with a low three-quarter-arm delivery, Scherzer has achieved numerous strikeout records and distinctions. He is the tenth pitcher in history to garner at least three Cy Young Awards, the sixth to record two no-hitters in one season, the fifth to produce more than one immaculate inning, and the fourth to strike out at least 200 batters in a season seven years in a row.

The Diamondbacks selected Scherzer, a native of Greater St. Louis, in the first round and 11th overall of the 2006 amateur draft from the University of Missouri. A seven-time MLB All-Star, he is the fifth pitcher to start an All-Star Game for both the American and National Leagues. He is a winner of three strikeout titles, a four-time wins leader, and a four-time walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) leader. In addition to three Cy Young Awards, he also finished second in its voting in 2018 and fifth in 2014 and 2015. One the most consistent hurlers of his era, he has made at least 30 starts each season from 2009 to 2018, and struck out at least 230 batters in each season from 2012 to 2018. In 2018, he reached 300 strikeouts for the first time. Prior to the 2015 season, Scherzer agreed to a seven-year, $210 million contract with the Nationals, one of the largest in baseball history.

During his major league debut, Scherzer established the record for most consecutive hitters retired in a relief appearance as a major league debut with 13. He became the third pitcher to start a season with a 19–1 win–loss record, on the way to winning his first Cy Young Award in 2013. In 2015, Scherzer became the sixth pitcher in Major League history to record multiple no-hitters in a single season, including the first with at least 17 strikeouts and no bases on balls, and the first to accrue a game score of 100 or more twice in one season. On May 11, 2016, he tied the major league nine-inning strikeout record with 20, making him the second player to achieve both a no-hitter and 20 strikeouts over nine innings, and in the same game became the youngest-ever pitcher to beat all 30 teams. In 2017, he became the third-fastest hurler to record 2,000 strikeouts, and the fourth to strike out 250 or more in four consecutive seasons. Scherzer has more strikeouts (2,503) than any pitcher in the 2010s. He recorded one immaculate inning each in 2017 and 2018.

Nolan Ryan

Lynn Nolan Ryan Jr. (born January 31, 1947), nicknamed The Ryan Express, is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher and a previous chief executive officer (CEO) of the Texas Rangers. He is currently an executive adviser to the owner of the Houston Astros.

Over a record 27-year career, Ryan pitched for the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros, and Texas Rangers. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999.Ryan was a right-handed pitcher who consistently threw pitches that were clocked above 100 miles per hour (161 km/h). He maintained this velocity throughout his career, even into his 40's. Ryan was also known to throw a devastating 12–6 curveball at exceptional velocity for a breaking ball.Ryan had a lifetime winning percentage of .526, and he was an eight-time MLB All-Star. His 5,714 career strikeouts is an MLB record by a significant margin. He leads the runner-up, Randy Johnson, by 839 strikeouts. Similarly, Ryan's 2,795 bases on balls lead second-place Steve Carlton by 962—walking over 50% more hitters than any other pitcher in MLB history. Ryan, Pedro Martínez, Randy Johnson, and Sandy Koufax are the only four pitchers inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame who had more strikeouts than innings pitched. Ryan is one of only three players in history to have his number retired by at least three teams, along with Jackie Robinson (whose number was retired by Major League Baseball) and Frank Robinson.

Ryan is the all-time leader in no-hitters with seven, three more than any other pitcher. He is tied with Bob Feller for the most one-hitters, with 12. Ryan also pitched 18 two-hitters. Despite this, he never pitched a perfect game, nor did he ever win a Cy Young Award. Ryan is one of only 29 players in baseball history to have appeared in Major League baseball games in four different decades.

Ramón Martínez (pitcher)

Ramón Jaime Martínez (born March 22, 1968) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball. He won 135 games over a 13-year career, mostly with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He is the older brother of Hall of Fame pitcher Pedro Martínez, and is currently a senior advisor in Latin America for the Baltimore Orioles.

Randy Johnson

Randall David Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed "The Big Unit", is an American former professional baseball pitcher who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), from 1988 to 2009, for six teams. He played primarily for the Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks. His 303 career victories rank as the fifth-most by a left-hander in MLB history, while his 4,875 strikeouts place him second all-time behind Nolan Ryan and are the most by a left-hander. He holds five of the seven highest single-season strikeout totals by a left-hander in modern history. Johnson won the Cy Young Award five times, second only to Roger Clemens' seven, and he is one of only two pitchers (the other being Greg Maddux) to win the award in four consecutive seasons (1999–2002). In 1999, he joined Pedro Martínez and Gaylord Perry in the rare feat of winning the award in both the American and National Leagues (a feat since accomplished by Clemens, Roy Halladay, and Max Scherzer). He is also one of five pitchers to pitch no-hitters in both leagues. On May 18, 2004, at the age of forty, Johnson became the oldest pitcher in major league history to throw a perfect game, and is one of seven pitchers who have thrown both a perfect game and a no-hitter in their careers. He is also one of eighteen pitchers in history to record a win against all 30 MLB franchises. On May 8th 2001, Johnson achieved the feat of striking out 20 batters in one game, doing so against the Cincinnati Reds.

One of the tallest players in major league history at 6 feet 10 inches (2.08 m), and a ten-time All-Star, Johnson was celebrated for having one of the most dominant fastballs in the game. He regularly approached – and occasionally exceeded – 100 miles per hour (160 km/h), during his prime. Johnson also threw a hard, biting slider. After struggling early in his career (having won only 64 games by his 30th birthday), he went on to lead his league in strikeouts nine times, and in earned run average, winning percentage, and complete games four times each. Johnson was named one of two (along with Curt Schilling) World Series Most Valuable Players in 2001, with three pitching victories, leading the Diamondbacks to a World Series championship over the New York Yankees in only Arizona’s fourth season. He won the pitching Triple Crown in 2002.

Johnson's .646 career winning percentage ranks sixth among left-handers with at least 200 decisions; among southpaws, he ranks eighth in games started (603) and ninth in innings pitched (​4,135 1⁄3). Johnson’s career elite rankings also include: first in strikeouts per nine innings pitched (10.67), third in hit batsmen (188), and tenth in fewest hits allowed per nine innings pitched (7.24). He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2015, his first year of eligibility, and is the first member of the Hall to be depicted in a Diamondbacks uniform on his plaque.

Roger Clemens

William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is an American former baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, more than any other pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.

Clemens debuted in the major leagues in 1984 with the Boston Red Sox, whose pitching staff he anchored for 12 years. In 1986, he won the American League (AL) Cy Young Award, the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award, and the All-Star Game MVP Award, and he struck out an MLB-record 20 batters in a single game (Clemens repeated the 20-strikeout feat 10 years later). After the 1996 season, Clemens left Boston via free agency and joined the Toronto Blue Jays. In each of his two seasons with Toronto, Clemens won a Cy Young Award, as well as the pitching triple crown by leading the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts. Prior to the 1999 season, Clemens was traded to the New York Yankees where he won his two World Series titles. In 2003, he reached his 300th win and 4,000th strikeout in the same game. Clemens left for the Houston Astros in 2004, where he spent three seasons and won his seventh Cy Young Award. He rejoined the Yankees in 2007 for one last season before retiring. He is the only pitcher in major league history to record over 350 wins and strike out over 4,500 batters.

Clemens was alleged by the Mitchell Report to have used anabolic steroids during his late career, mainly based on testimony given by his former trainer, Brian McNamee. Clemens firmly denied these allegations under oath before the United States Congress, leading congressional leaders to refer his case to the Justice Department on suspicions of perjury. On August 19, 2010, a federal grand jury at the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., indicted Clemens on six felony counts involving perjury, false statements and Contempt of Congress. Clemens pleaded not guilty, but proceedings were complicated by prosecutorial misconduct, leading to a mistrial. The verdict from his second trial came in June 2012, when Clemens was found not guilty on all six counts of lying to Congress.

Ron Guidry

Ronald Ames Guidry (; born August 28, 1950), nicknamed "Louisiana Lightning" and "Gator", is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) left-handed pitcher who played his entire 14-year career for the New York Yankees of the American League (AL). Guidry was also the pitching coach of the Yankees from 2006 to 2007.

Guidry's major league career began in 1975. He was a member of World Series-winning Yankees teams in 1977 and 1978. He won the AL Cy Young Award in 1978, winning 25 games and losing only 3. He also won five Gold Glove Awards and appeared in four All-Star games. Guidry served as captain of the Yankees beginning in 1986; he retired from baseball in 1989. In 2003, the Yankees retired Guidry's uniform number (49) and dedicated a plaque to him in Monument Park.

Sandy Koufax

Sanford Koufax (; born Sanford Braun; December 30, 1935) is a former American professional baseball left-handed pitcher. He pitched 12 seasons for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1955 to 1966. Koufax, at age 36 in 1972, became the youngest player ever elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. He has been hailed as one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history.

Koufax's career peaked with a run of six outstanding years from 1961 to 1966, before arthritis in his left elbow ended his career prematurely at age 30. He was an All-Star for six seasons and was the National League's Most Valuable Player in 1963. He won three Cy Young Awards in 1963, 1965, and 1966, by unanimous votes, making him the first three-time Cy Young winner in baseball history and the only one to win three times when one overall award was given for all of major league baseball instead of one award for each league. Koufax also won the NL Triple Crown for pitchers those same three years by leading the NL in wins, strikeouts, and earned run average.Koufax was the first major league pitcher to pitch four no-hitters and the eighth pitcher to pitch a perfect game in baseball history. Despite his comparatively short career, Koufax's 2,396 career strikeouts ranked 7th in history as of his retirement, at the time trailing only Warren Spahn (2,583) among left-handers. Koufax, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez, and Nolan Ryan are the only five pitchers elected to the Hall of Fame who had more strikeouts than innings pitched.

Koufax is also remembered as one of the outstanding Jewish athletes in American sports. His decision not to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur garnered national attention as an example of conflict between professional pressures and personal beliefs.

Steve Carlton

Steven Norman Carlton (born December 22, 1944), nicknamed "Lefty", is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. He pitched from 1965 to 1988 for six different teams in his career, but it is his time with the Philadelphia Phillies where he received his greatest acclaim as a professional and won four Cy Young Awards. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Carlton has the second-most lifetime strikeouts of any left-handed pitcher (4th overall), and the second-most lifetime wins of any left-handed pitcher (11th overall). He was the first pitcher to win four Cy Young Awards in a career. He held the lifetime strikeout record several times between 1982 and 1984, before his contemporary Nolan Ryan passed him. One of his most remarkable records was accounting for nearly half (46%) of his team's wins, when he won 27 games for the last-place (59-97) 1972 Phillies. He is the last National League pitcher to win 25 or more games in one season, as well as the last pitcher from any team to throw more than 300 innings in a season. He also holds the record with the most career balks of any pitcher, with 90 (double the second on the all-time list, Bob Welch).

Strikeout

In baseball or softball, a strikeout (or strike-out) occurs when a batter racks up three strikes during a time at bat. It usually means the batter is out. A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K. A "strikeout looking" — in which the batter does not swing and the third strike is called by the umpire — is usually denoted by a ꓘ.Although a strikeout suggests that the pitcher dominated the batter, the free-swinging style that generates home runs also leaves batters susceptible to striking out. Some of the greatest home run hitters of all time – such as Alex Rodriguez, Reggie Jackson, and Sammy Sosa – were notorious for striking out.

Tom Seaver

George Thomas Seaver (born November 17, 1944), nicknamed Tom Terrific and The Franchise, is a retired American professional baseball pitcher. He pitched in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1967 to 1986 for the New York Mets, Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox, and Boston Red Sox. He played a role in the Mets' victory in the 1969 World Series.

With the Mets, Seaver won the National League (NL)'s Rookie of the Year Award in 1967, and won three NL Cy Young Awards as the league's best pitcher. He is a 12-time All-Star. Seaver is the Mets' all-time leader in wins, and he threw a no-hitter in 1978. During a 20-year MLB career, Seaver compiled 311 wins, 3,640 strikeouts, 61 shutouts and a 2.86 earned run average.

In 1992, Seaver was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the highest percentage of votes ever recorded at the time. He is one of two players wearing a New York Mets hat on his plaque in the Hall of Fame. He is also a member of the New York Mets Hall of Fame and the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. In 2019, the Mets renamed 126th Street in front of Citi Field to Seaver Way. The stadium's address is now 41 Seaver Way, a tribute to the No. 41 that Seaver wore during his career.

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