List of Major League Baseball single-game runs batted in leaders

Tony Lazzeri (left), Rudy York (center) and Nomar Garciaparra (right) are the only players to amass 10 runs batted in and hit two grand slams in the same game.

Tony Lazzeri COTA F1257 s1057 it3350 cropped
Rudy York 1945
Nomar2002

In baseball, a run batted in (RBI) is awarded to a batter for each runner who scores as a result of the batter's action, including a hit, fielder's choice, sacrifice fly, sacrifice bunt, catcher's interference, or a walk or hit by pitch with the bases loaded.[1] A batter is also awarded an RBI for scoring himself upon hitting a home run.[1] Sixteen players have batted in at least 10 runs in a single Major League Baseball (MLB) game to date, the most recent being Mark Reynolds of the Washington Nationals on July 6, 2018.[2] No player has accomplished the feat more than once in his career and no player has ever recorded more than 12 RBIs in a game. Wilbert Robinson was the first player to record at least 10 RBIs in a single game,[3][4] driving in 11 runs for the Baltimore Orioles against the St. Louis Browns on June 10, 1892.[5]

As of 2018, every team that has had a player achieve the milestone has won the game in which it occurred. These games have resulted in other single-game MLB records being set due to the stellar offensive performance. Robinson, for example, also amassed seven hits in that same game, setting a new major league record that has since been tied by only one other player.[6] Mark Whiten hit four home runs to complement his 12 RBIs for the St. Louis Cardinals on September 7, 1993, tying the single-game records in both categories.[7][8] By attaining both milestones, he became one of only two players to hit four home runs and drive in 10 or more runs in the same game,[3] with Scooter Gennett being the other.[2][9] Tony Lazzeri, Rudy York, and Nomar Garciaparra hit two grand slams during their 10 RBI game,[10][11][12] equaling the record for most grand slams in one game.[13] Norm Zauchin has the fewest career RBIs among players who have 10 RBIs in one game with 159, while Alex Rodriguez, with 2,086, drove in more runs than any other player in this group and hit the third most in major league history.[14]

Of the eight players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who have batted in 10 runs in a game, four have been elected and one was elected on the first ballot. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 MLB seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months.[15] These requirements leave three players ineligible who are living and have played in the past five seasons and two—Phil Weintraub and Zauchin—who did not play in 10 seasons.[16][17]

Players

Wilbert Robinson 1916
Wilbert Robinson was the first player to drive in at least 10 runs in one game, and also amassed a record seven hits in the same game.
Baltimore Orioles third baseman Mark Reynolds (12)
Mark Reynolds is the most recent player to hit 10 RBIs in one game, achieving the feat in 2018.
Key
Player Name of the player
Date Date of the game
Team The player's team at the time of the game
Opposing team The team against whom the player hit 10 runs batted in
Score Final score of the game, with the player's team score listed first
Runs batted in Number of runs batted in the player hit
Career RBI The number of runs batted in the player hit in his MLB career
dagger Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
double-dagger Player is active
MLB hitters with 10 RBI in one game
Player Date Team Opposing team Score Runs batted in Career RBI Refs
Wilbert Robinsondagger June 10, 1892 Baltimore Orioles St. Louis Browns 25–4 11 722 [5][18]
Jim Bottomleydagger September 16, 1924 St. Louis Cardinals Brooklyn Robins 17–3 12 1,422 [19][20]
Tony Lazzeridagger May 24, 1936 New York Yankees Philadelphia Athletics 25–2 11 1,194 [21][22]
Phil Weintraub April 30, 1944 New York Giants Brooklyn Dodgers 26–8 11 207 [16][23]
Rudy York July 27, 1946 Boston Red Sox St. Louis Browns 13–6 10 1,152 [24][25]
Walker Cooper July 6, 1949 Cincinnati Reds Chicago Cubs 23–4 10 812 [26][27]
Norm Zauchin May 27, 1955 Boston Red Sox Washington Senators 16–0 10 159 [17][28]
Reggie Jacksondagger June 14, 1969 Oakland Athletics Boston Red Sox 21–7 10 1,702 [29][30]
Fred Lynn June 18, 1975 Boston Red Sox Detroit Tigers 15–1 10 1,111 [31][32]
Mark Whiten September 7, 1993 St. Louis Cardinals Cincinnati Reds 15–2 12 423 [33][34]
Nomar Garciaparra May 10, 1999 Boston Red Sox Seattle Mariners 12–4 10 936 [35][36]
Alex Rodriguez April 26, 2005 New York Yankees Los Angeles Angels 12–4 10 2,086 [37][38]
Garret Anderson August 21, 2007 Los Angeles Angels New York Yankees 18–9 10 1,365 [39][40]
Anthony Rendondouble-dagger April 30, 2017 Washington Nationals New York Mets 23–5 10 420 [41][42]
Scooter Gennettdouble-dagger June 6, 2017 Cincinnati Reds St. Louis Cardinals 13–1 10 349 [43][44]
Mark Reynoldsdouble-dagger July 7, 2018 Washington Nationals Miami Marlins 18–4 10 851 [45][46]

References

General

  • "RBI Records / Runs Batted in Records (scroll down to bottom)". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  • "10 RBIs in a game". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved May 7, 2014.

Specific

  1. ^ a b "Official Rules: 10.00 – The Official Scorer". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved May 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Sheldon, Mark (June 7, 2017). "Electric Scooter! Slam 1st of 4 historic HRs". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved June 7, 2017.
  3. ^ a b Simpson, Jake (May 10, 2010). "6 Ways to Achieve Baseball Immortality". The Atlantic. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  4. ^ Hernandez, Dylan (August 22, 2007). "Driving home his points". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Blevins, Dave (December 23, 2011). The Sports Hall of Fame Encyclopedia: Baseball, Basketball, Football, Hockey, Soccer. Scarecrow Press. p. 823. ISBN 9781461673705. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  6. ^ Semchuck, Alex. "Wilbert Robinson". The Baseball Biography Project. Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  7. ^ "Baseball; Whiten's 4 Homers, 12 Runs Batted In Tie Exclusive Records". The New York Times. September 8, 1993. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  8. ^ "RBIs: Jim Bottomley/Mark Whiten, 12 – Best Single-Game Performances in Baseball History". Sports Illustrated. CNN. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  9. ^ "10 RBIs in a game". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  10. ^ Glueckstein, Fred. "Tony Lazzeri". The Baseball Biography Project. Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  11. ^ "Rudy York hits two grand slams as Red Sox wallop the Browns". Tampa Bay Times. St. Petersburg. Associated Press. July 27, 1981. p. 3C. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  12. ^ Edes, Gordon (May 11, 1999). "Nomar Garciaparra's two grand slams lead Red Sox". The Boston Globe. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  13. ^ "Two grand slams in a game – Rare Feats". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved May 16, 2014.
  14. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Runs Batted In". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  15. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 16, 2014.
  16. ^ a b "Phil Weintraub Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  17. ^ a b "Norm Zauchin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  18. ^ "Wilbert Robinson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  19. ^ "September 16, 1924 St. Louis Cardinals at Brooklyn Robins Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. September 16, 1924. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  20. ^ "Jim Bottomley Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  21. ^ "May 24, 1936 New York Yankees at Philadelphia Athletics Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. May 24, 1936. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  22. ^ "Tony Lazzeri Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  23. ^ "April 30, 1944 Brooklyn Dodgers at New York Giants Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. April 30, 1944. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  24. ^ "July 27, 1946 Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Browns Reds Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 27, 1946. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  25. ^ "Rudy York Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  26. ^ "July 6, 1949 Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati Reds Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 6, 1949. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  27. ^ "Walker Cooper Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  28. ^ "May 27, 1955 Washington Senators at Boston Red Sox Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. May 27, 1955. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  29. ^ "June 14, 1969 Oakland Athletics at Boston Red Sox Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. June 14, 1969. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  30. ^ "Reggie Jackson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  31. ^ "June 18, 1975 Boston Red Sox at Detroit Tigers Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. June 18, 1975. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  32. ^ "Fred Lynn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  33. ^ "September 7, 1993 St. Louis Cardinals at Cincinnati Reds Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. September 7, 1993. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  34. ^ "Mark Whiten Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  35. ^ "May 10, 1999 Seattle Mariners at Boston Red Sox Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. May 10, 1999. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  36. ^ "Nomar Garciaparra Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  37. ^ "April 26, 2005 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at New York Yankees Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. April 26, 2005. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  38. ^ "Alex Rodriguez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  39. ^ "August 21, 2007 New York Yankees at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. August 21, 2007. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  40. ^ "Garret Anderson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  41. ^ "April 30, 2017 New York Mets at Washington Nationals Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. April 30, 2017. Retrieved May 1, 2017.
  42. ^ "Anthony Rendon Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 1, 2017.
  43. ^ "June 6, 2017 St. Louis Cardinals at Cincinnati Reds Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. June 6, 2017. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  44. ^ "Scooter Gennett Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 7, 2017.
  45. ^ "July 7, 2018 Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. July 7, 2018. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  46. ^ "Mark Reynolds Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on April 5, 2009. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
2017 Cincinnati Reds season

The 2017 Cincinnati Reds season was the 128th season for the franchise in Major League Baseball, and their 15th at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati. The Reds opened the season with a game against the Philadelphia Phillies on April 3 at the Great American Ball Park and finished the season on October 1 against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field. The Reds were eliminated from postseason playoff consideration on September 14, 2017. They equaled their record from the previous season and finished last in their division for the third straight year and missed the playoffs for the fourth straight year.

2017 Washington Nationals season

The 2017 Washington Nationals season was the Nationals' 13th season as the baseball franchise of Major League Baseball in the District of Columbia, the 10th season at Nationals Park, and the 49th since the original team was started in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. They won the National League East division title for the fourth time in six years but were defeated by the Chicago Cubs in the Division Series.

Alex Rodriguez

Alexander Emmanuel Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975), nicknamed "A-Rod", is an American former professional baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily with the New York Yankees. He also played for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers. Rodriguez began his professional career as one of the sport's most highly touted prospects, and is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time. Rodriguez amassed a .295 batting average, over 600 home runs (696), over 2,000 runs batted in (RBI), over 2,000 runs scored, over 3,000 hits, and over 300 stolen bases, the only player in MLB history to achieve all of those feats. He was also a 14-time All-Star, winning three American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Awards, ten Silver Slugger Awards, and two Gold Glove Awards. Rodríguez is also the career record holder for grand slams with 25. He signed two of the most lucrative sports contracts in baseball. In addition to his accomplishments, he also led a controversial career due to some of his behaviors, including the use of performance-enhancing drugs.The Mariners selected Rodriguez first overall in the 1993 MLB draft, and he debuted in the major leagues the following year at the age of 18. In 1996, he became the Mariners' starting shortstop, won the major league batting championship, and finished second in voting for the AL MVP Award. His combination of power, speed, and defense made him a cornerstone of the franchise, but he left the team via free agency after the 2000 season to join the Rangers. The 10-year, $252 million contract he signed was the richest in baseball history at the time. He played at a high level in his three years with Texas, highlighted by his first AL MVP Award win in 2003, but the team failed to make the playoffs during his tenure. Prior to the 2004 season, Rodriguez was traded to the Yankees, for whom he converted to a third baseman, because Derek Jeter was already the Yankees' full-time shortstop. During Rodriguez's career with the Yankees, he was named AL MVP in 2005 and 2007. After opting out of his contract following the 2007 season, Rodriguez signed a new 10-year, $275 million deal with the Yankees, extending his record for the sport's most lucrative contract. He became the youngest player ever to hit 500 home runs, reaching the milestone in 2007. He was part of the Yankees' 2009 World Series championship over the Philadelphia Phillies, which was the first year of the new Yankee Stadium and Rodriguez's only world title. Toward the end of his career, Rodriguez was hampered by hip and knee injuries, which caused him to become exclusively a designated hitter. He played his final game in professional baseball on August 12, 2016.

During a 2007 interview with Katie Couric on 60 Minutes, Rodriguez denied using performance-enhancing drugs. In February 2009, Rodriguez admitted to using steroids, saying he used them from 2001 to 2003 when playing for Rangers due to "an enormous amount of pressure" to perform. While recovering from a hip injury in 2013, Rodriguez made headlines by feuding with team management over his rehabilitation and for having allegedly obtained performance-enhancing drugs as part of the Biogenesis baseball scandal. In August 2013, MLB suspended him for 211 games for his involvement in the scandal, but he was allowed to play while appealing the punishment. Had the original suspension been upheld, it would have been the longest non-lifetime suspension in Major League Baseball history. After an arbitration hearing, the suspension was reduced to 162 games, which kept him off the field for the entire 2014 season.After retiring as a player, Rodriguez became a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network. In January 2018, ESPN announced that Rodriguez would be joining the broadcast team of Sunday Night Baseball In January 2017, CNBC announced Rodriguez would be the host of the show Back In The Game, where he would help former athletes make a comeback in their personal lives; the first episode debuted on the network in March 2018.

Anthony Rendon

Anthony Michael Rendon (, born June 6, 1990) is an American baseball third baseman for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball (MLB). Rendon played college baseball for the Rice University Owls, where he won the 2010 Dick Howser Trophy. Rendon was selected sixth overall in the 2011 Major League Baseball draft by the Nationals.

Scooter Gennett

Ryan Joseph "Scooter" Gennett (born May 1, 1990) is an American professional baseball second baseman for the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Milwaukee Brewers. On June 6, 2017, he became the 17th player in major league history to hit four home runs in a single game.

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